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The web Directory of Information Materials for People Affected by Cancer is regularly updated and currently has details of over 1,900 booklets, leaflets, books and audiovisual materials for people affected by cancer. Most have been published in the last five years but we have included some older ones that are still useful.

Results: 6

Cover image of 'Living with the long-term effects of cancer. Acknowledging trauma and other emotional challenges'

Living with the long-term effects of cancer. Acknowledging trauma and other emotional challenges (2020)

Jessica Kingsley Publishers

Challenging a number of myths about living long term with or after cancer, this book offers new insights by delving into areas that are not usually spoken about. Written from a dual perspective- that of a psychologist who had breast cancer and who copes with the long-term effects of treatment - the book contests the assumption that the afflicted person will simply 'get better' or 'move through' to a better situation. Emotional and physical side-effects can worsen over time and people living beyond or with cancer often endure a mismatch between expectations and reality, because they have been told that life would be easier than it actually is. This can leave both those suffering longer term and those close to them confused and unprepared. Including testimonies with people who have had a cancer diagnosis and people in the medical profession, the book signposts ways that professionals may help and offers prompts for friends and relatives to have useful and open conversations with the person affected. It gives voice to many people who feel that their suffering is disputed and diminished by the prevailing narrative around recovery. Galgut includes discussion on relationships, work, trauma, fear of recurrence and the role of therapy. Giving an unflinchingly honest perspective, Living with the Long-Term Effects of Cancer sheds light on these struggles, in the belief that bringing this conversation to the forefront is key to improving life for those who are affected by cancer and who suffer longer term from its effects. (Pub;lisher)

Cover image of 'Follow the child. Planning and having the best end-of-life care for your child'

Follow the child. Planning and having the best end-of-life care for your child (2018)

Jessica Kingsley Publishers

Drawing on her family's own experiences and those of other parents facing the death of a child from illness or a life-limiting condition, Sacha Langton-Gilks explains the challenges, planning, and conversations that can be expected during this traumatic period. Practical advice such as how to work with the healthcare professionals, drawing up an Advance Care Plan, and how to move care into the home sit alongside tender observations of how such things worked in her own family's story. The book also includes a template person-centred planning document, developed by experts in the field. Empowering and reassuring, this book will help families plan and ensure the best possible end-of-life care for a child or young person. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Gone in the morning. A writer’s journey of bereavement'

Gone in the morning. A writer’s journey of bereavement (2018)

Jessica Kingsley Publishers

An exploration of death, bereavement and grief. This first hand account gives Geoff Mead's experience of responding to the loss of his wife from a brain tumour. Giving insight into the grieving process and how Geoff learned to manage his grief, this book will offer hope to anyone experiencing something similar. After coming to the realisation that mourning is a conscious process, to which we can apply creativity, passion and intelligence, Geoff explored the unknown territory of bereavement through his writing. The book shows how artful practice, such as writing, can help to make sense of our experience and navigate the wreckage of grief. (Publishers)

Cover image of 'Big tree is sick'

Big tree is sick (2017)

Jessica Kingsley Publishers

Snibbles and Big Tree are best friends! They have always hung out together, and Snibbles loves Big Tree very much. When Big Tree unexpectedly falls ill with woodworm, Snibbles is very upset and angry. The illness is a very bad one and Big Tree does not feel well and doesn't want to play for a long time. Poor Snibbles! He wants Big Tree to get better, but he feels as if there is nothing he can do. What can Snibbles and his friends do to help Big Tree through his treatment and recovery? This beautifully illustrated storybook describes the anger and emotion that many children encounter when a close relative or friend is diagnosed with a long-term illness, such as cancer. The story of Big Tree depicts how things are often out of your control and sets out effective strategies for dealing with these emotions. This story features loveable characters and vivid illustrations, as well as activities for children aged 5+ to complete with their parents or professionals in times of illness and loss. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'A sky of diamonds: a story for children about loss, grief and hope'

A sky of diamonds: a story for children about loss, grief and hope (2015)

Jessica Kingsley Publishers

When Mia learns that her mother has died, all the colour in her world changes to a dreary grey. She feels guilty, angry, sad and lost (sometimes all at once!), and she doesn't know what to do to feel better. Little by little, with the help of her Dad, Mia learns how to cope with her difficult feelings. Together, they remember her mother by creating memory boxes, and they even get rid of anger by crazily sloshing paints and punching holes in newspapers! In the end, Mia finds her own, very special way of coping. When she feels sad or lonely, she looks up to the stars. Full of practical strategies, this storybook for children aged 5-9 addresses loss, grief and hope. Written from the perspective of Mia who has experienced the sudden death of her mother, it covers the different stages of grief, from initial disbelief, anger and sadness to resolution and hope. The book highlights the importance of giving children the time and space to work through their feelings and provides a host of thoughtful activities to help them cope. It also addresses some of the questions children commonly ask about death. Uniquely illustrated, this book will be an invaluable resource for anyone supporting a grieving child, especially bereavement counsellors, social workers, teachers and other school staff, as well as parents. (Publishers)

Cover image of 'What does dead mean? A book for young children to help explain death and dying'

What does dead mean? A book for young children to help explain death and dying (2012)

Jessica Kingsley Publishers

What Does Dead Mean? is a beautifully illustrated book that guides children gently through 17 of the 'big' questions they often ask about death and dying. Questions such as 'Is being dead like sleeping?', 'Why do people have to die?' and 'Where do dead people go?' are answered simply, truthfully and clearly to help adults explain to children what happens when someone dies. Prompts encourage children to explore the concepts by talking about, drawing or painting what they think or feel about the questions and answers. Suitable for children aged 4+, this is an ideal book for parents and carers to read with their children, as well as teachers, therapists and counsellors working with young children. (Publisher)

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