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The web Directory of Information Materials for People Affected by Cancer is regularly updated and currently has details of over 1,900 booklets, leaflets, books and audiovisual materials for people affected by cancer. Most have been published in the last five years but we have included some older ones that are still useful.

Results: 6

Cover image of 'The circle. A young adult's journey with cancer'

The circle. A young adult's journey with cancer (2020)

Independently published

Cancer. It's a word associated with an unrivalled sense of dread, but also one that unites us in a variety of painful and unexpected ways. I, like many others, did my best to remain ignorant of the unpleasant truths surrounding this illness until at just the age of 19 I was diagnosed with Ewing's Sarcoma, a rare bone cancer. This compiled journal is a record of my experiences as part of a group that can often be underrepresented in the public's approach to cancer. Follow me from the beginning to the end of this at times dire journey, where I do my best to learn what I can to share with the world about how we can better fight this illness on the psychological plain. If you or a loved one are in a similar situation, or perhaps you're looking to simply satisfy morbid curiosity, then partake in a unique account on one young man's experience with one of humanity's greatest killers. (Author) 

Cover image of 'Tommy v cancer. One man’s battle against the Big C. (Again).'

Tommy v cancer. One man’s battle against the Big C. (Again). (2019)

Independently published

In March 2016, cancer attacked me for the first time. I was diagnosed with inoperable, stage four throat cancer and underwent intensive courses of both chemotherapy and radiotherapy which left me extremely weak and vulnerable to infection. As a result, I contracted double pneumonia and sepsis and was rushed into intensive care where my family was told that, unless I began responding to treatment, I had approximately two hours left to live. Thankfully, I pulled through and set off upon the long road to recovery. It was the hardest thing I've ever faced but - eventually, in the summer of 2017 - I was declared cancer free.For a few months, at least. In January 2018, a routine scan found the cancer had returned - and had now spread to my lungs. Bugger. "Tommy v cancer: Round Two" continues the story of my fight to survive the 'Big C', salvage what remained of my career, and support my terrified family through yet another battle of life and death. (Publisher)

Cover image of '365 days past the traffic lights'

365 days past the traffic lights (2019)

Independently published

How do you cope with the death of a parent at 24 years old? The time when you’re somewhere between independence and reliance on parents, figuring out who you are and what you want to do, and trying to maintain friendships and a social life when your world is crumbling around you and no one understands. Rose Taylor straddled two worlds; living in both a picturesque English village and an adventure filled Hollywood lifestyle in Los Angeles. But in late 2017 life hurtled her into a new realm, one that was immersed in medical settings and put her life on hold. In this compelling and emotive memoir, Rose Taylor explores the first 365 days following the death of her father. She writes frankly about the moment of diagnosis, the experience of becoming a carer for a parent and sheds light on the psychological and physical symptoms of bereavement. The book takes the reader between London, Atlanta and Los Angeles weaving together the experience of grieving and a narrative of reconciling memory and loss. The book ultimately offers a voice for grieving young adults, with the aim of showing them they are not alone. (Publisher) 

Cover image of 'How long have I got? The story of a ‘terminal’ cancer patient'

How long have I got? The story of a ‘terminal’ cancer patient (2019)

Independently published

Suitcases filled with medication. Life and death situations. Multiple organ removal. Risking everything to stay alive just one more day. And people still moan to you when they have a cold. Welcome to the life of a ‘terminal’ cancer patient. In January 2016 thirty-year-old Fi Munro was diagnosed with stage four ovarian cancer. Told from day one that her cancer was incurable and ‘terminal’, Fi faced unimaginable pain, heartache and suffering as the life she’d dreamed of was suddenly pulled away from her. Yet in the wake of this news she did not wallow. Instead she discovered a remarkable inner strength, resilience and, above all, a very dark sense of humour. Years later and she is still here, having outlived, in her opinion, two ‘very unreasonable’ prognoses. How Long Have I Got? is her inspiring story. Honest, open and often tear-jerking this is everything you wanted to know - and some stuff you’ll want to forget - about living with cancer and an important reminder that we are all terminal. Reading this will change your life forever. Fi Munro is a multi-award-winning researcher, author, blogger, speaker and mentor recognised internationally for her presentations and articles on her journey and the importance of holistic health. She has been featured in two BBC documentaries, in TV and radio shows, and in newspaper and magazine articles across the globe. Today she is healthier and happier than ever before and believes cancer saved her life. She is currently training to be a shaman and is excited for what the future holds. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Welcome to the Pink Ladies Club. Fighting breast cancer and finding friends'

Welcome to the Pink Ladies Club. Fighting breast cancer and finding friends (2017)

Independently published

Karen Bates was diagnosed with breast cancer after a routine screening. In this frank and heartfelt memoir, she shares her story and tips for surviving breast cancer, chemotherapy and reconstruction surgery. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Tommy v cancer.  One man's battle against the big C'

Tommy v cancer. One man's battle against the big C (2017)

Independently published

On Thursday, 10th of March 2016, I returned home from a hospital appointment and broke the news to my wife and children. I had throat cancer. Stage four. Inoperable. Desperately needing some way to make sense of my situation, I set up a blog to chart my battle against the disease. I hoped it would allow me to understand more about this thing inside me, and what I would have to go through in terms of treatment to try to eradicate it. I also thought it might help other people who found themselves in similar circumstances. I made a promise to my readers to be open and honest all the way. I wouldn't hold anything back, no matter how unpleasant. Now, over a year later, I have adapted that blog into this book. It details my journey from when I first realised that something was wrong, through the intense courses of chemotherapy and radiotherapy, to where I am today. To say that journey was difficult is a vast understatement. The side effects of my treatment utterly kicked my arse, causing me to lose over half my bodyweight and fall seriously ill with double pneumonia and sepsis. Totally unresponsive, I was rushed into intensive care where the doctors told my family that, if they couldn't stabilise me, I had approximately two hours left to live. One option was to put me into a medically induced coma, although the chances were high that I would never emerge from it. Imagine someone telling you that about your loved one as they lie there, unconscious and struggling to breathe. Cancer is an invader that affects more than just the patient. Everyone suffers - spouses, siblings, children, extended family, friends. Even, as I was to discover, strangers from all over the world. I was overwhelmed with the love and kindness of almost everyone who contacted me, but I also suffered terrible abuse at the hands of online trolls. I should warn you that parts of this book do not make for easy reading. I kept my promise to be honest, and wrote many of the blog entries when I was depressed and scared, certain I wouldn't live to see another dawn. I convinced myself that I would quickly perish, leaving my wife and two sons - then aged 9 and 17 - alone, and with no-one to protect them or provide for them. I wouldn't get to see them grow up, develop into young men, and eventually have children of their own. The prospect terrified me. For those of you who followed my blog and read the posts as I uploaded them, you haven't seen everything. This book c

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