We understand that people with cancer are worried about coronavirus. Here is the latest guidance. We will update it regularly.

My Macmillan

Publications directory

Need to talk? Call us free*
0800 808 00 00 Monday to Friday, 9am-8pm

The web Directory of Information Materials for People Affected by Cancer is regularly updated and currently has details of over 1,900 booklets, leaflets, books and audiovisual materials for people affected by cancer. Most have been published in the last five years but we have included some older ones that are still useful.

Results: 160

Cover image of 'Pear shaped'

Pear shaped (2015)

Self-published using CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

Adam is a 44-year-old London lawyer and father of three. Completely out of the blue, and for no reason other than sheer dumb chance, he was diagnosed with a rare and aggressive brain tumour. Adam has endured radiotherapy and chemotherapy which were preceded by major brain surgery to remove the tumour - helpfully described by his surgeon as being the size and shape of a pear. Using the blackest of humour, this book charts Adam's journey from normality to having a disease regularly described as a “death sentence”. How will he cope with the treatment? How will his relationship with family and friends be affected? Most important of all, how will his hair come through this? Quite simply, it is the funniest book so far this year about brain cancer. Warning - this book is intended for mature audiences due to the subject matter and use of strong language. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Brain tumours for dummys'

Brain tumours for dummys (2015)

Self-published using CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

Thinking nothing of an epileptic seizure, my carefree and single-thinking lifestyle continued as usual. That was until the results of the scan. A brain tumour stopped me in my tracks. Suddenly I had to rely on others. Moving out of my crime-ridden area was supposed to be a positive move towards recovery following the most mind bending experience of "awake" brain surgery. But Sarah and I couldn't have been more wrong. Our new home was in the flat beneath the neighbours from hell. Radiotherapy may have been easy if it hadn’t been for the scum determined to make our lives a misery, sending me to the brink of despair. With a lifestyle that featured an unhealthy amount of alcohol and facing up to my addictions and self-loathing, the early grave was looking more likely than the millionaire life I dreamed of. Getting back to work and experiencing new cultures helped to put me back on track. Rather than dwell on my own self-pity I drew inspiration from the world and people around me until finally I'd gotten hold of a normal life. A normal life that didn't last long. The townships in Africa, the petrol bombings, murders and car crashes that I'd witnessed in such a small space of time; none of them came close to the next chapter in my life. Finding out I would be a dad was one thing, but triplets? The path forward from there on in would prove to be chaotic but truly magical. The joys of a becoming a triplet father from that astonishing moment of the baby scan through to the events of the birth and beyond, coupled with the devastating deaths of good friends taught me the true meaning of life. But all that was the easy bit… (Publisher) 

Cover image of 'Cancer is my teacher'

Cancer is my teacher (2014)

Quartet Books

Every two minutes someone in the UK is diagnosed with cancer. Lucy O'Donnell was herself three years ago. Cancer is My Teacher is her story, describing unflinchingly how she has turned the disease into a positive experience - and how you can do the same. Lucy's approach is determined but disciplined, clinical but also holistic. By addressing the physical, emotional, and spiritual aspects of cancer, Lucy covers the whole spectrum of the disease - including how to tell the family, the dos and donts of communicating with a patient, the side-effects of radiotherapy and chemotherapy - and gives practical advice on how to keep looking your best and even what to pack for surgery. Cancer is My Teacher offers guidance for anyone in the early stages of diagnosis, in treatment or trying to readjust afterwards. It also helps family and loved ones to understand what they're going through - and, above all, carries a message of hope for everyone touched by cancer. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'My left boob. A cancer diary'

My left boob. A cancer diary (2013)

Book Guild Publishing

Diagnosed with breast cancer in her fifties, award-winning actress and glamour girl-about-town Sally Farmiloe-Neville decided to keep a diary. This is the frank and honest account of her fight to beat the tumour within, retain as much of her left breast as possible - and carry on working meanwhile. Filled with helpful advice to fellow sufferers based on her own experiences, needle-phobic Sally documents her treatment as she goes through the horrors of chemotherapy, surgery and radiotherapy, helped by a healer, a hypnotherapist and a special diet. When her trademark 'big' hair falls out she reveals how she coped by getting ‘Crystal’, a long blonde NHS wig that wowed every man she met. Her family and friends - including many famous household names - are by her side throughout, but many of them have fought their own battles with the big C and Sally documents their stories, too. Always upbeat, never sorry for herself, this is the courageous tale of one woman's struggle to regain her health. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'How I said Bah! to cancer. A guide to thinking, laughing, living and dancing your way through cancer'

How I said Bah! to cancer. A guide to thinking, laughing, living and dancing your way through cancer (2011)

Hay House

This book tells how one woman said 'Bah!' to cancer through thinking strategies, a proactive approach to treatment, and a determination to keep the rest of her life going and retain a sense of humour (most of the time!). It shares everything she learnt along the way, from the nature of cancer cells and chemotherapy drugs, to how she was able to help her friends and family to help her. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Jack's radio mission'

Jack's radio mission (2011)

Lulu.com

Jack is a little boy who is having radiotherapy. With the help of Lucy, the radiographer, Jack pretends his treatment is a space mission.

Cover image of 'A woman's disease. The history of cervical cancer'

A woman's disease. The history of cervical cancer (2011)

Oxford University Press

Cervical cancer is an emotive disease with multiple connotations. It has stood for the horror of cancer, the curse of femininity, the hope of cutting-edge medical technologies and the promise of screening for malignant tumours. For a long time, this disease was identified with the most dreaded aspects of malignancies: prolonged invalidity and chronic pain, but also physical degradation, shame and social isolation. Cervical cancer displayed in parallel the dangers of being a woman. In the 20th century, innovations initially developed to control cervical cancer - radiotherapy and radium therapy, exfoliate cytology (Pap smear), homogenisation of the 'staging' of tumours, mass campaigns for an early detection of precancerous lesions of the cervix - set standards for diagnosis, treatment and prevention of other malignancies. In the late 20th century, cervical cancer underwent another important change. With the display of the role of selected strands of HPV (Human Papilloma Virus) in the genesis of this malignancy, it was transformed into a sexually transmitted disease. This new understanding of cervical cancer linked it more firmly with lifestyle choices, and thus increased the danger of stigmatisation of patients; on the other hand it opened the possibility for efficient prevention of this malignancy through vaccination. Ilana Lowy follows the disease from antiquity to the 21st century, focussing on the period since the mid-19th century, during which cervical cancer was dissociated from other gynaecological disorders and became a distinct entity. Following the ways in which new developments in science, medicine, and society have affected beliefs about medical progress and an individual's responsibility, gender roles, reproduction, and sex, Lowy demonstrates our understanding of what cervical cancer is, and how it can be prevented and cured. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The psychological impact of breast cancer: a psychologist's insights as a patient'

The psychological impact of breast cancer: a psychologist's insights as a patient (2010)

Radcliffe Publishing

What is it like to experience breast cancer? This book presents rare and valuable insights into the impact of diagnosis, treatment and prognosis from a woman who has experienced breast cancer as both patient and as health professional. It informs and educates readers about the psychological realities of living with breast cancer, of treatments such as surgery and radiotherapy, and the impact of social and historical attitudes to the breast and breast cancer on a woman's experience of the disease. The conflicts Cordelia Galgut experienced between conventional wisdom and her own first-hand experience are explored vividly and reflectively. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Saving my arse. A story of cancers, colons and Singapore noodles'

Saving my arse. A story of cancers, colons and Singapore noodles (2008)

Mark Davies

If you or a family member or friend is diagnosed with Bowel/colon cancer then this book will hopefully be of some use and comfort. But I really wrote this book for all of those people, who thought like me that cancer and its treatments begins and ends with losing your hair and sitting around in hospitals like a displaced Hare Krishna convention, whilst having an uncontrollable urge to run the marathon. I want to allay, if at all possible, some the fears that we all have of cancer without boring anyone to tears or being over emotional. More people than ever are surviving, and go on to live a normal life. I am not a doctor, nor have I ever had any medical training, so I found that I didn't really understand a lot of what was being talked about by the doctors. Questions like: What is Chemotherapy and what does it do? What happens during Radiotherapy? (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Getting on with cancer'

Getting on with cancer (2002)

Books Beyond Words

"Books beyond words" is a series of picture books that has been developed for people who have difficulty reading and who can understand pictures better than words, and to enable discussion about difficult topics. Supporting text and guidelines are also provided for carers, supporters and professionals. When Veronica's doctor told her she had cancer, she was confused and terrified. Then he told her some cancers can be cured. `Getting on with cancer' tells the story of Veronica, a woman with Down's Syndrome, who has cancer. She has surgery and also radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The book deals honestly with the unpleasant side of treatment. It is designed to be used as a counselling tool by anyone working with people who have both learning disabilities and cancer. It will also be valuable for other client groups, for example, people with chronic mental health problems. The book ends on a positive note. Included in the book is Veronica Donaghey's story 'It's not all bad news', written in her own words. There are also guidelines for carers/supporters and for healthcare professionals, and information on relevant resources and helpful organisations. (Publisher)

Sorry, no publications found.
Need to talk? Call us free*
0800 808 00 00 Monday to Friday, 9am-8pm