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Publications directory

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The web Directory of Information Materials for People Affected by Cancer is regularly updated and currently has details of over 1,900 booklets, leaflets, books and audiovisual materials for people affected by cancer. Most have been published in the last five years but we have included some older ones that are still useful.

Results: 77

Cover image of 'The life and death of an unknown celebrity'

The life and death of an unknown celebrity (2012)

Janus Publishing Company Ltd

There was less of her now, but I loved her more. In this raw personal account of tragedy told from a male perspective, the author shares with us what must be one of the most devastating things in anyone’s life when he loses his wife and the mother of his two young children to breast cancer. Darren then has to face telling his children that their mother is never coming back as he learns to adjust to his new life and shake hands with his sorrow. To watch a loved one deteriorate so quickly is very disturbing. To stand by feeling helpless as the cancer spreads through the body, causing it to die, is heartbreaking. Shoe obsessions, screaming, sympathy sex and Starbucks were all part of his journey of self-pity as he loses himself in idle distractions. Through this honest account, Darren shows us that there is hope, once the searing pain of grief has subsided and memories of a past become subdued as he is set on the path to acceptance and happiness. A world without love is a lonely place, so it is comforting to know that love can blossom again - even after the worst and longest winter (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The yellow world. Trust your dreams and they'll come true'

The yellow world. Trust your dreams and they'll come true (2012)

Particular Books (Penguin Imprint)

Albert Espinosa never wanted to write a book about surviving cancer, so he didn't. He wrote a book instead about the Yellow World. What is the yellow world? The yellow world is a world that's within everyone's reach, a world the colour of the sun. It is the name of a way of living, of seeing life, of nourishing yourself with the lessons that you learn from good moments as well as bad ones. It is the world that makes you happy, the world you like living in. The yellow world has no rules; it is made of discoveries. In these 23 Discoveries Albert shows us how to connect daily reality with our most distant dreams. He tells us that 'losses are positive', 'the word 'pain' doesn't exist', and 'what you hide the most reveals the most about you'. Albert Espinosa has won several battles with death, which is why his stories are so full of life. He is powerful because he never gives up. And as a last resort he bargains: he swapped a leg and a lung for his life. He has learnt how to lose in order to win. He's hyperactive and prefers losing sleep to losing experiences. If you want to tell him something it has to be very good or told very fast. He loves to provoke people but he does it to make provocations seem normal. His greatest hope is that after you have read this book you will go off in search of your yellow world. Albert Espinosa is a bestselling author. At the age of thirteen, Albert was diagnosed with cancer, an event that changed his life forever. When he was fourteen, his left leg had to be amputated. At sixteen his left lung was removed, and when he was eighteen part of his liver was taken out. After ten years in and out of hospitals, when he was finally told that he had been cured of the disease, he realised that his illness had taught him that what is sad is not dying, but rather not knowing how to live. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Enjoy every sandwich. Living each day as if it were your last'

Enjoy every sandwich. Living each day as if it were your last (2011)

Bantam Press (imprint of Transworld Publications)

As medical director of the famed Preventive Medicine Research Institute, Lee Lipsenthal helped thousands of patients struggling with disease to overcome their fears of pain and death and to embrace a more joyful way of living. In his own life, happily married and the proud father of two remarkable children, Lee was similarly committed to living his life fully and gratefully each day. The power of those beliefs were tested in July 2009, when he was diagnosed with esophageal cancer, leaving him with a 90 percent chance of dying within five years. As Lee and his wife, Kathy, navigated his diagnosis, illness, and treatment, he discovered that he did not fear death, and that even as he was facing his own mortality, he felt more fully alive than ever before. In the tradition of Don't Sweat the Small Stuff, Tuesdays with Morrie and The Last Lecture, Enjoy Every Sandwich distils everything Lee learned about how we find meaning, purpose, and peace in our lives. Told with humour and heart, this deeply inspiring book will help readers embrace their humanity, accept uncertainty, and live a life of gratitude - whether they are facing the end now or not. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'A woman's disease. The history of cervical cancer'

A woman's disease. The history of cervical cancer (2011)

Oxford University Press

Cervical cancer is an emotive disease with multiple connotations. It has stood for the horror of cancer, the curse of femininity, the hope of cutting-edge medical technologies and the promise of screening for malignant tumours. For a long time, this disease was identified with the most dreaded aspects of malignancies: prolonged invalidity and chronic pain, but also physical degradation, shame and social isolation. Cervical cancer displayed in parallel the dangers of being a woman. In the 20th century, innovations initially developed to control cervical cancer - radiotherapy and radium therapy, exfoliate cytology (Pap smear), homogenisation of the 'staging' of tumours, mass campaigns for an early detection of precancerous lesions of the cervix - set standards for diagnosis, treatment and prevention of other malignancies. In the late 20th century, cervical cancer underwent another important change. With the display of the role of selected strands of HPV (Human Papilloma Virus) in the genesis of this malignancy, it was transformed into a sexually transmitted disease. This new understanding of cervical cancer linked it more firmly with lifestyle choices, and thus increased the danger of stigmatisation of patients; on the other hand it opened the possibility for efficient prevention of this malignancy through vaccination. Ilana Lowy follows the disease from antiquity to the 21st century, focussing on the period since the mid-19th century, during which cervical cancer was dissociated from other gynaecological disorders and became a distinct entity. Following the ways in which new developments in science, medicine, and society have affected beliefs about medical progress and an individual's responsibility, gender roles, reproduction, and sex, Lowy demonstrates our understanding of what cervical cancer is, and how it can be prevented and cured. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The c-word'

The c-word (2010)

Arrow Books

Carrie Bradshaw fell in Dior, I fell in Debenhams. It was May 2008, and it was spectacular. Uncomfortable heels + slippy floor + head turned by a cocktail dress = thwack. Arms stretched overhead, teeth cracking on floor tiles, chest and knees breaking the fall. It was theatrical, exaggerated, a perfect 6.0. And it was Significant Moment #1 in discovering that I had grade-three breast cancer. The last thing Lisa Lynch had expected to put on her 'things to do before you're 30' list was beating breast cancer, but them's the breaks. So with her life on hold, and her mind close to capacity with unspoken fears, questions and emotions, she turned to her Mac and started blogging about the frustrating, life-altering, sheer pain-in-the-arse inconvenience of getting breast cancer at the age of 28. The C-Word is an unflinchingly honest and darkly humorous account of Lisa’s battle with The Bullshit, as she came to call it. From the good days when she could almost pretend it wasn't happening, to the bad days, when she couldn't bear to wake up, Lisa's story is emotional, heartbreaking and often hilarious. The C-Word will make you laugh and cry, and ultimately reaffirm your faith in life. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'How to be sick. A Buddhist-inspired guide for the chronically ill and their caregivers'

How to be sick. A Buddhist-inspired guide for the chronically ill and their caregivers (2010)

Wisdom Publications

'How to be sick: A Buddhist-inspired guide for the chronically ill' and their caregiver is about living skilfully with the challenges of any chronic illness or condition. I wrote it for sufferers and for their caregivers (the latter includes people involved in hospice, chaplaincy, and elder care; for those interested in chronic illnesses and conditions (health professionals, family and friends); and for people interested in Buddhism (illness can function as a metaphor for suffering which, along with the cessation of suffering, is at the heart of the Buddha’s teaching). Chronic illnesses or conditions - such as arthritis, heart disease, and diabetes (three among dozens) - while not immediately life-threatening, are life-disrupting and stressful. The book is unique in that each chapter contains easy-to-learn tools and practices to help the chronically ill and their caregivers live skilfully, maintain equanimity, and even find joy despite the profound changes in their lives. A recurring theme in the book is that, although one’s body may be sick, one’s mind can be at peace. Some of the practices presented are traditionally Buddhist. Others I devised after becoming ill. Two are from the work of Byron Katie. Each practice is illustrated with examples from my own experience, so the book is also highly personal. The practices are intended to help with the following types of challenges: Suffering due to the relentlessness of physical symptoms; Blaming oneself for being sick; Cursory or dismissive treatment by doctors and medical professionals; The inability to visit with friends, participate in family gatherings, and take part in other social events; Feeling ignored by family or friends; Suffering due to uncertainty about the future; Coping with the disappointment of failed treatments; Caretaker burnout. At the end of the book is a handy reference guide, summarizing the specific tools and practices that can help with each of the above challenges. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The day the sea went out and never came back'

The day the sea went out and never came back (2003)

Speechmark Publishing Ltd

"The day the sea went out and never came back" is a story for children who have lost someone they love. Eric is a sand dragon who loves the sea very much. Each day, he watches it going out and coming back. His sea is beautiful indeed to him. But one day, the sea goes out and does not come back. Eric waits and waits, but it does not come back. So he falls on the sand in terrible pain. It feels to him as if he has lost everything. After many bleak days, Eric sees a little wild flower. It is dying. Eric knows he must save it. He finds water. More and more flowers appear and so Eric starts to make a beautiful rock pool garden. And as he does, he finds the courage to feel the full pain of his loss, instead of closing his heart. He realises that his memories of his precious sea are like a special kind of treasure in his mind, a treasure he will never lose. (Publisher)

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