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The web Directory of Information Materials for People Affected by Cancer is regularly updated and currently has details of over 1,900 booklets, leaflets, books and audiovisual materials for people affected by cancer. Most have been published in the last five years but we have included some older ones that are still useful.

Results: 370

Cover image of 'How to live well with chronic pain and illness'

How to live well with chronic pain and illness (2015)

Wisdom Publications

Comfort, understanding, and advice for those who are suffering--and those who care for them. Chronic illness creates many challenges, from career crises and relationship issues to struggles with self-blame, personal identity, and isolation. Toni Bernhard addresses these challenges and many more, using practical examples to illustrate how mindfulness, equanimity, and compassion can help readers make peace with a life turned upside down. In her characteristic conversational style, Bernhard shows how to cope and make the most of life despite the challenges of chronic illness. Benefit from: Mindfulness exercises to mitigate physical and emotional pain Concrete advice for negotiating the everyday hurdles of medical appointments, household chores, and social obligations Tools for navigating the strains illness can place on relationships Several chapters are directed toward family and friends of the chronically ill, helping them to understand what their loved one is going through and how they can help. Humorous and empathetic, Bernhard shares her own struggles and setbacks with unflinching honesty, offering invaluable support in the search to find peace and well-being. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Cancer survivorship coping tools - we'll get you through this'

Cancer survivorship coping tools - we'll get you through this (2015)

Ayni Books

Hearing the words “You have cancer” can be devastating - some cancer patients even say that the emotional pain and loss of certainty from hearing this are worse than the pains from the cancer, surgeries, radiation, chemotherapy, and other treatments. This is the intimate journey of a melanoma and breast cancer survivor who honestly, and sometimes even humorously, shares her own story and offers supportive emotional tools to help people diagnosed with cancer, and their loved ones and caregivers, work through the emotional pain and upheaval of a cancer diagnosis. You will be supported in knowing what it feels like to hear you have cancer and be given a variety of helpful ideas to start feeling better whether you are newly diagnosed, in treatment, or months or years after treatment. If you are a caregiver, friend, or family member who wants to help, you will get a better understanding of the cancer experience as well as tools to help the person you care about. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The breast reconstruction guidebook'

The breast reconstruction guidebook (2017)

Johns Hopkins University Press

For a decade The Breast Reconstruction Guidebook has been the best resource on this topic for women who have had a mastectomy. Equal parts science and support, it is filled with stories that illustrate the emotional and physical components of breast reconstruction. Readers will find advice about choosing a doctor and a procedure, insurance and payment issues, how to prepare for surgery, and what to expect during recovery. Expert commentary by physicians and insights from patients inform this book, as does the exhaustive research by the author, a two-time breast cancer survivor who has twice had reconstructive surgery. New in this edition are discussions of: the pros and cons of saline and silicone implants; solutions for post-lumpectomy cosmetic problems; new immediate-delayed reconstruction when post-mastectomy radiation may be required; the benefits and limitations of nipple-sparing mastectomy; considerations for direct-to-implant reconstruction; newly developed tissue flap procedures; who can best apply nipple and areola tattoos and why tattoos may not last; enriching fat with stem cells so it stays in the breast; patient-controlled tissue expansion; how insurance and health care reform affect reconstruction. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'What does super Jonny do when mum gets sick?'

What does super Jonny do when mum gets sick? (2014)

Books For Caring Kids

Jonny is a little superhero with a BIG problem. His Mum is sick. How can he help? Join Super Jonny and Bear, as they go to the hospital to investigate. LEARN who the staff working in the hospital are and what they do. DISCOVER Jonny's secret weapon. Super Jonny is recommended by teachers for teachers. The question page links to the English and New Zealand national curriculums. These questions teach the children how to help the sick. Some people need regular hospital care to manage their disease. These people have their own page entitled: Preparing for a hospital admission: 5 tips for chronically ill moms. This ensures that any mother who is going into hospital, has some supplies when her children visit. This list of simple suggestions could also be filled by any adult wanting to help a Mom who is suddenly sick. With its big bold professionally drawn illustrations, Super Jonny is a valuable resource for your family, school or medical centre. (Publisher).

Cover image of 'The selfish pig's guide to caring'

The selfish pig's guide to caring (2009)

Piatkus (Little, Brown Book Group)

Six million people in the UK provide unpaid care for disabled or elderly relatives or neighbours, often unnoticed. Their job is long, lonely and hard, yet there is limited support and no formal training. As a result, carers suffer frequent damage to physical and mental health and are liable to feelings of guilt brought on by fatigue and isolation. Hugh Marriott, a carer himself, has written this book for them - and also for the rest of us who hadn't realised what went on behind those closed doors. The Selfish Pig's Guide to Caring airs topics such as sex, thoughts of murder, coping with incontinence and dealing with friends and officials who fail to understand. It's a must-read for anyone involved with caring. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Tea & chemo. Fighting cancer, living life'

Tea & chemo. Fighting cancer, living life (2015)

Urbane Publications Limited

At the age of 45, wife and mother Jackie Buxton was diagnosed with breast cancer. Lurching between the crippling fear that the cancer had spread, and the great comfort of knowing she was one of the lucky ones who could be treated, she did what she always does when life presents her with a challenge: she wrote it down. Jackie quickly realised that even with cancer, life was far from bad. Never known for her scientific prowess, she nonetheless became a 'bit of an expert' - at least in the field of hair loss, water retention and biscuits - and decided to use her writing to share experiences and help others recognise you don't have to be defined by your cancer. Tea & Chemo is full of laughter, tears, honesty and hope, and offers inspirational words to everyone facing the life challenges that cancer inevitably brings. All proceeds from the sales of Tea & Chemo will go to three incredibly important charities, whose compassionate care and professionalism make the difference to so many lives: The Haven, Breast Cancer Now and The Robert Ogden Macmillan Centre, Harrogate. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'I felt a right one... and now I feel a right one again'

I felt a right one... and now I feel a right one again (2013)

Matador

“Whilst in the bath I lay back and take a look at my 'bigger than I would really like' body and focus on my chest. My G cup breasts are not difficult to miss, even with my poor eyesight, but what I see makes me sit up straight. It looks like my right nipple is 'not on straight'. I put my glasses on and have a really good look, then start to gently feel my whole right breast. I feel the left one for good measure and can definitely detect a lump on the right side...” This is the true story of Karen Tighe, an ordinary woman, and her journey through discovery, diagnosis, treatment and reconstruction. Amusing and thoughtfully written, it is particularly helpful in describing the physical, emotional and psychological processes that a patient can go through - and how that impacts upon their life, and that of their family. Karen's aim in writing the book was to make cancer less frightening and anyone who is either suffering from cancer, or knows someone who is, will find the book to be of great help. Karen Tighe is donating the profits from her book to St Luke's Hospice and Breast Cancer Care. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Your guide through her breast cancer journey'

Your guide through her breast cancer journey (2012)

Urban Traffic Publishing

If someone you love and care about has just been diagnosed with breast cancer and you're feeling a little helpless, scared and not sure what to do next, then this is the book for you. 'Your Guide Through Her Breast Cancer Journey' will provide you with what you need to know right now. Everything from diagnosis and treatment to coming out the other end and most importantly, this book explains clearly how you can make a difference. Written by a recent breast cancer survivor, this book will give you first hand information on how you can support her with easy-to-understand explanations, tips and advice so you can be there every step of the way for the person that you love. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Gift of time'

Gift of time (2013)

Constable

An heartbreakingly honest and deeply moving memoir in the words of the son, his wife and his mother of her battle with cancer, from one of the UK's best loved travel writers. When his mother Joan was diagnosed with terminal cancer, Rory MacLean and his wife Katrin took her into their home. For five months, as their life fragmented and turned inward, they fought both to resist and to accept the inevitable. Each gave vent to their emotions in different ways, but all three kept a diary. Heartbreakingly honest and deeply moving, Gift of Time is the story of those days, in the words of a son, his wife and his mother. Woven together into a poignant meditation on life and death, they illuminate the courage and dignity of one woman who confronted what we all must face. Threaded through with wisdom and guilt, anger and acceptance, the story is punctuated by a family wedding and the hope of new life, by bin-bags of old letters and books rediscovered, by the end of winter and the first signs of spring. Powerful, raw and urgent, this slender volume is above all a celebration of life. Capturing every moment of beauty and pain it acknowledges that what survives all of us is love. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Words for wellbeing: using creative writing to benefit health and wellbeing'

Words for wellbeing: using creative writing to benefit health and wellbeing (2012)

Cumbria Partnership NHS Foundation Trust

Words for Wellbeing' is an edited collection of prose and poems from patients, health care staff, carers and the general public. The authors included in the book all have their own story to tell about how writing has helped improve their health and wellbeing. The contributors include people from across Cumbria and from ages 7 to 94 years old, and include emotional pieces about a variety of subjects, and includes a foreword is written by award-winning writer Jim Eldridge. There are 14 chapters, including one written by leading author Dr Gillie Bolton. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The whole-food guide for breast cancer survivors'

The whole-food guide for breast cancer survivors (2012)

New Harbinger Publications

Millions of breast cancer survivors have two things in common: a renewed gratitude for their good health and a recharged commitment to taking care of their bodies. The Whole-Food Guide for Breast Cancer Survivors is an integrative, whole foods guide to rebuilding health after surviving breast cancer and reducing the chance of breast cancer reoccurrence. Although cancer does have a significant genetic component, lifestyle factors such as nutrition also play a role in determining the likelihood that cancer will reappear. This program helps readers get the nutrition they need in order to keep breast cancer at bay, with specific guidance for managing hormone levels with food. The guide also explains how nutritional deficiencies, environmental factors, and antioxidants affect cancer's ability to attack the body. Using holistic health and nutrition leader Edward Bauman's Eating for Health model, readers learn to eat for pleasure, eat for energy, eat for recovery, and eat for health in order to starve cancer and enjoy stronger, healthier bodies. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Emotional support through breast cancer. The alternative handbook'

Emotional support through breast cancer. The alternative handbook (2013)

Radcliffe Publishing

This compassionate guide presents an array of new perspectives on the emotional effects of breast cancer and includes many personal testimonies from women who have been diagnosed with this disease. Written by a breast cancer survivor and practising psychologist, it shares practical ideas to help support sufferers at all stages, be it at diagnosis, during treatment or during life after the initial treatments are over. The concise, easy-to-read format includes exercises to develop an acceptance of thoughts and feelings, whilst the individual accounts validate the multitude of emotions felt by sufferers. It is a must for all breast cancer patients and sufferers, their families and friends. Its real-life approach, using first hand accounts, is also highly recommended for all health and social care professionals wanting a fresh approach to managing the emotional impacts of breast cancer. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Worms on parachutes. Mystical allies in my cancer survival'

Worms on parachutes. Mystical allies in my cancer survival (2013)

Self-published using CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

I was diagnosed with Triple Negative Breast Cancer on the 15th June 2007. I remember that day so vividly. It will be ingrained in my memory forever as it is the day I felt my perfect little world crumble. I remember hearing those terrifying words, “I’m sorry it’s cancer” and falling to pieces. I hollered as my mind froze and my body went numb. I was frightened, felt incredibly vulnerable and my greatest fear stared me in the face. I could potentially die, and leave behind my two beautiful daughters and a husband who is also my best friend, and the person I love to have at my side. I’m pleased to report those initial feelings softened as time passed. Now it is important to share my story to give hope, encouragement and inspiration to others faced with a life-threatening illness. I believe that sharing stories helps to inspire those who are touched by cancer. You seek hope reassurance that treatments can be very successful today. Breast Cancer isn’t the only illness I have overcome. I had a near death experience in Africa as a child, I was an accident-prone youngster and the sickly one in my family. I was diagnosed with Hodgkin Disease, a cancer of the lymphatic system at 16, yes, I’m very greedy one cancer wasn’t enough. Fingers crossed cancer will leave me alone now. I will not give in! However, it is quite possible that radiation treatment for that cancer caused my breast cancer 20 years later. Yet from all the mishaps I experienced, I walk away truly blessed that people who entered my life as strangers ended up making the greatest impact on my life. What makes Worms On Parachutes special is that I was inspired to write after receiving outstanding medical care. Therefore, it deals with relationships from medical professionals to family and friends so openly and honestly. It is an insightful read that I believe will be helpful and supportive to anyone experiencing cancer today in whatever role you play. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The dog, the chick and the reindeer. The story of a family living with cancer'

The dog, the chick and the reindeer. The story of a family living with cancer (2013)

Apollo Publishing

In 2004 my mother asked us to donate to the Macmillan team in lieu of a present. It is ironic that she then developed and survived endometrial cancer in 2006 and was diagnosed with and died from ovarian cancer in 2012, especially as the Macmillan team supported us to keep her in the home she loved right to the end. The story tells of the effects of both cancers on Mum and the rest of the family. Naturally there were sad times and some excruciatingly painful and stressful times but there were also some funny and touching moments. Audrey, Mum's sister was coincidentally diagnosed with oesophageal cancer and at one point they were in different wards at opposite ends of the same hospital. The day we were told of Mum’s diagnosis, we wheeled her down to sit with Audrey and they held hands and hugged, one in a wheelchair and the other hooked up to all kinds of machinery. Audrey died thirteen days after mum. There is no doubt that my mother loved her family - she had nearly ninety children, grandchildren, great grandchildren and great, great grandchildren, both biological and adopted; whilst the story is written from my perspective, I wasn't the only one to suffer and it could easily have been written by thirty or forty other people. When I found out mum had a terminal illness I made up my mind to take her back to her home, which is the only place she wanted to be; some people thought I was mad but we had a dedicated team of family and were lucky to be further supported by her GP, the DN’s and Macmillan team. I organised weekly rotas to ensure 24 hour care: The book tells how we coped with this and of my panic the day I found out the Macmillan support team didn’t have any sitters for the following week. It also portrays the “normal” things we did along as we rode our six year emotional roller coaster, such as going on holidays and dealing with other family crises. The last twelve months before her death were intolerable. The last six months a nightmare, and the ten weeks between diagnosis and her passing were hell on earth but we had some laughs, we cried and we sang songs. A few weeks before she died, as my daughter entered the room Mum was playing a game with my younger grandchildren, throwing the tiny purple chick to each of them in turn and giggling along with them, its tail flashing as though it too was enjoying the fun. I initially wrote the book to help me deal with my own grief, stress and feelings of guilt that I was glad she had finally let g

Cover image of 'It's not over till the bag lady rings'

It's not over till the bag lady rings (2007)

Spring Hill

On the basis of comments left on the author's blog, this book should appeal to cancer patients, survivors and those who care for people with cancer - healthcare professionals as well as friends and family - and anyone else wanting an insight into this wretched disease. Cancer sufferers not only have to deal with big issues - like confronting their own mortality - they have to cope with the everyday as well - the effect on relationships, changes in diet, whether or not to replace the dishwasher - and in the case of bowel cancer, perhaps a colostomy or ileostomy - while all the time trying to remain positive. Based on the author's online diaries, this book will enable the reader to get inside the mind of a cancer patient and discover what it feels like to have to cope with this disease. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The cancer journey. Positive steps to help yourself heal'

The cancer journey. Positive steps to help yourself heal (2011)

Noble House

'The Cancer Journey. Positive steps to help yourself heal' is an inspirational and compelling book which provides the blueprint for dealing with cancer and is the book of choice for anyone affected by this disease. The authors, Polly, Pam and Nick have all had their own different cancer diagnoses, and feel passionate about sharing the information they have gathered which has helped them understand and cope throughout their journeys. The book is written in a warm, compassionate style with gentle humour, offering comfort and practical advice for anyone affected by cancer including family and friends. What should you eat, what shouldn't you eat? How do you deal with the side-effects? How do you politely tell others 'I have cancer' without triggering an uncomfortable silence! How to prepare for medical appointments and get the best out of your doctors. What can family and friends do to help? This book tells you things you need to know that your health care professionals may not tell you. Whether you have a diagnosis yourself, or you know someone with cancer, this book gives you the tools to empower yourself to take control and it offers advice and guidance to support you throughout your journey. When you arm yourself with knowledge of how to help yourself, you become an empowered participant in your own health. We will walk you through your diagnosis and give you permission and the tools to take control of your situation no matter where you are on the journey. This book gives you all of the information you need to make a difference in your health. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Past caring. The beginning not the end'

Past caring. The beginning not the end (2004)

Polperro Heritage Press

Actress Audrey Jenkinson was starring in a BBC television series when she put her career on hold and returned home to Edinburgh to care for her mother suffering from a stroke and her father with cancer. In Past Caring, she describes how she tried to cope with her parents' deaths and recalls the void she felt at the time. `I wondered how others coped in similar situations. When I discovered there were no books on the subject I decided to write one.' Audrey travelled throughout the UK, interviewing former carers and asking them how they rebuilt their lives. 'The stories I heard were both fascinating and uplifting, and I knew other people would find them interesting and helpful. Past Caring also includes a twelve-step recovery guide for 'past carers'. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Am I going to die?'

Am I going to die? (2009)

Books Beyond Words

John has a terminal illness. This book tells his story, dealing with both physical deterioration and the emotional aspects of dying in an honest and moving way. John is shown getting weaker and needing more help. He looks back at his life and makes choices about how to spend his time. The pictures highlight the importance of going on special outings, of remembering good times, and of saying proper goodbyes to family and friends. The final images show John dying at home. Guidelines are provided (as text at the back) for carers and supporters, health and other professionals who provide support to people with learning disabilities who are terminally ill. Lists of other helpful written resources and relevant organisations are also given. Although this story is fictional, it is based on the real life experiences of ten people with learning disabilities who had a terminal illness. They participated in the Veronica Project, a research project conducted by St George’s Hospital, London and funded by Cancer Research UK. The book draws on what was important for the participants when they were ill and dying and demonstrates best practice as identified by them. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Intimacy after breast cancer. Dealing with your body, relationships and sex'

Intimacy after breast cancer. Dealing with your body, relationships and sex (2010)

Square One Press

Congratulations! You survived breast cancer. This should be a time to celebrate - so why do you feel so empty and alone? Medical professionals prepare you for surgery and other treatments, but do not always address your emotional and sexual health. In 'Intimacy After Breast Cancer', breast cancer survivor Gina Maisano honestly discusses the sensitive issues of self-esteem, body image, and sexuality to help you become the total woman you still are. Part One begins by examining the emotions experienced by breast cancer survivors, including anxiety and fear of recurrence. It then offers guidance on regaining the confidence to start living again. The mental and physical effects of post-surgical medications are discussed, along with solutions for maintaining optimum health. Part Two focuses on rediscovering your sexuality. In a compassionate manner, it addresses the issues that most often challenge both single and married women and presents suggestions for overcoming them. Love and intimacy do not have to end with a breast cancer diagnosis. In 'Intimacy After Breast Cancer', Gina Maisano will help you rediscover the joys of being a woman. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'How to be sick. A Buddhist-inspired guide for the chronically ill and their caregivers'

How to be sick. A Buddhist-inspired guide for the chronically ill and their caregivers (2010)

Wisdom Publications

'How to be sick: A Buddhist-inspired guide for the chronically ill' and their caregiver is about living skilfully with the challenges of any chronic illness or condition. I wrote it for sufferers and for their caregivers (the latter includes people involved in hospice, chaplaincy, and elder care; for those interested in chronic illnesses and conditions (health professionals, family and friends); and for people interested in Buddhism (illness can function as a metaphor for suffering which, along with the cessation of suffering, is at the heart of the Buddha’s teaching). Chronic illnesses or conditions - such as arthritis, heart disease, and diabetes (three among dozens) - while not immediately life-threatening, are life-disrupting and stressful. The book is unique in that each chapter contains easy-to-learn tools and practices to help the chronically ill and their caregivers live skilfully, maintain equanimity, and even find joy despite the profound changes in their lives. A recurring theme in the book is that, although one’s body may be sick, one’s mind can be at peace. Some of the practices presented are traditionally Buddhist. Others I devised after becoming ill. Two are from the work of Byron Katie. Each practice is illustrated with examples from my own experience, so the book is also highly personal. The practices are intended to help with the following types of challenges: Suffering due to the relentlessness of physical symptoms; Blaming oneself for being sick; Cursory or dismissive treatment by doctors and medical professionals; The inability to visit with friends, participate in family gatherings, and take part in other social events; Feeling ignored by family or friends; Suffering due to uncertainty about the future; Coping with the disappointment of failed treatments; Caretaker burnout. At the end of the book is a handy reference guide, summarizing the specific tools and practices that can help with each of the above challenges. (Publisher)

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