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The web Directory of Information Materials for People Affected by Cancer is regularly updated and currently has details of over 1,900 booklets, leaflets, books and audiovisual materials for people affected by cancer. Most have been published in the last five years but we have included some older ones that are still useful.

Results: 1825

Cover image of 'Lung cancer [Romanian]'

Lung cancer [Romanian] (December 2017)

Macmillan Cancer Support

This information is about lung cancer and treatments for lung cancer. It is about cancer that starts in the lung (primary lung cancer). It is not about cancer that starts somewhere else in the body and spreads to the lungs (secondary lung cancer). Includes English-language version.

Cover image of 'Lung cancer [Bulgarian]'

Lung cancer [Bulgarian] (December 2017)

Macmillan Cancer Support

This information is about lung cancer and treatments for lung cancer. It is about cancer that starts in the lung (primary lung cancer). It is not about cancer that starts somewhere else in the body and spreads to the lungs (secondary lung cancer). 

Cover image of 'Lung and bowel cancer'

Lung and bowel cancer (May 2017)

Action Cancer

Z-card with facts about bowel cancer (what it is, risk factors, symptoms, reducing the risk and screening) and lung cancer (what it is, risk factors, what to look out for, how to reduce the risk and stopping smoking).

Cover image of 'Lung cancer [Slovak]'

Lung cancer [Slovak] (December 2017)

Macmillan Cancer Support

This information is about lung cancer and treatments for lung cancer. It is about cancer that starts in the lung (primary lung cancer). It is not about cancer that starts somewhere else in the body and spreads to the lungs (secondary lung cancer).

Cover image of 'Lung cancer [Lithuanian]'

Lung cancer [Lithuanian] (December 2017)

Macmillan Cancer Support

This information is about lung cancer and treatments for lung cancer. It is about cancer that starts in the lung (primary lung cancer). It is not about cancer that starts somewhere else in the body and spreads to the lungs (secondary lung cancer).

Cover image of 'Lung cancer [Hungarian]'

Lung cancer [Hungarian] (December 2017)

Macmillan Cancer Support

This factsheet is about how lung cancer is diagnosed and treated.

Cover image of 'Lung cancer [Italian]'

Lung cancer [Italian] (December 2017)

Macmillan Cancer Support

A translation of selected pages from the Macmillan Cancer Support booklet “Understanding lung cancer” [MAC11632_E16_N], including types of lung cancer, staging and treatments.

Cover image of 'Lung cancer'

Lung cancer (February 2017)

British Lung Foundation

This leaflet explains what lung cancer is, and describes briefly how it is diagnosed and treated.

Cover image of 'Understanding lung cancer'

Understanding lung cancer (December 2017)

Macmillan Cancer Support

This booklet has detailed information on the causes of lung cancer, symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment options. Includes information on clinical trials and issues such as feelings, talking to children, and financial support. 

Cover image of 'Understanding lung cancer [Audio CD]'

Understanding lung cancer [Audio CD] (December 2017)

Macmillan Cancer Support

This audiobook explains lung cancer, covering the causes and symptoms, diagnosis, staging and grading, treatments and clinical trials. It also talks about emotional, practical and financial issues.

Cover image of 'Vinorelbine and cisplatin chemotherapy [Traditional Chinese]'

Vinorelbine and cisplatin chemotherapy [Traditional Chinese] (November 2017)

Macmillan Cancer Support

Vinorelbine and cisplatin may be used to treat non-small-cell lung cancer. This factsheet describes what it is, how the drugs are given and the possible side-effects.

Cover image of 'Paclitaxel [Portuguese]'

Paclitaxel [Portuguese] (October 2017)

Macmillan Cancer Support

Paclitaxel is most commonly used to treat breast, ovarian and non-small-cell lung cancer. This factsheet describes how it is given and the possible side-effects.

Cover image of 'Paclitaxel [French]'

Paclitaxel [French] (October 2017)

Macmillan Cancer Support

Paclitaxel is most commonly used to treat breast, ovarian and non-small-cell lung cancer. This factsheet describes how it is given and the possible side-effects.

Cover image of 'Paclitaxel [Arabic]'

Paclitaxel [Arabic] (October 2017)

Macmillan Cancer Support

Paclitaxel is most commonly used to treat breast, ovarian and non-small-cell lung cancer. This factsheet describes how it is given and the possible side-effects.

Cover image of 'It's so much easier since I quit. Your guide to quitting for good with Smokefree'

It's so much easier since I quit. Your guide to quitting for good with Smokefree (2017)

Department of Health

Main NHS Smokefree guide to helping smokers quit for good. Features an interactive planner that takes smokers through the four key steps to quitting smoking: Think; Prepare; Quit; Stop for good.

Cover image of 'Cisplatin [Russian]'

Cisplatin [Russian] (October 2017)

Macmillan Cancer Support

Cisplatin is a chemotherapy drug used to treat testicular, ovarian, bladder, head and neck, and non-small cell lung cancer. This factsheet describes what it is, how it is given, and possible side effects. 

Cover image of 'Sex and breathlessness'

Sex and breathlessness (March 2017)

British Lung Foundation

This illustrated leaflet has guidance for people with lung disease on how to enjoy a fulfilling sex life.

Cover image of 'Breathlessness. What to do if you get out of breath'

Breathlessness. What to do if you get out of breath (November 2017)

British Lung Foundation

This booklet explains what breathlessness is, the causes of acute and chronic breathlessness, the tests that might be necessary and management of breathlessness. It is not cancer specific.

Cover image of 'The cancer whisperer. How to let cancer heal your life'

The cancer whisperer. How to let cancer heal your life (2016)

Coronet (Hodder & Stoughton)

This book does not offer a cure for cancer. It offers a cure for your fear of cancer. Both memoir and self-help book, this is the remarkable chronicle of a passage from 'terminal' diagnosis to exuberant wellness in just a few months. The Cancer Whisperer reverses our traditional adversarial relationship with cancer by teaching us how to listen to it; how to be healed by it as well as seek to cure it; and how to be emotionally free of illness even when physically curtailed. Living on the frontier between her fierce will to live and necessary willingness to die, Sophie - now thriving with cancer - shares her journey with searing honesty, unapologetic vulnerability and intelligent pragmatism. Alongside rare insights into a condition now affecting approximately one in three people, she challenges the mental conditioning we need to overcome to redefine our narratives about cancer. As 'the cancer whisperer', she offers a groundbreaking practical guide that will encourage cancer patients to: Direct their own treatment while preserving their personhood in a system that tends to see them as patients more than people. Engage with fear, anger and grief in healthy and healing ways instead of toughing it out, trying to be positive or collapsing into despair. Radically shift from being a cancer victim to a cancer listener-to seeing cancer less as a disease than as a symptom of other underlying causes, and engaging proactively with whatever changes it calls on them to make. Discover what the author calls 'the whispering, the reaching into a well of darkness and finding your hands painted with light'. Inspired, wise and moving, this book is as unflinching as Lisa Lynch's The C Word, as uplifting as Kris Carr's Crazy, Sexy Cancer, and carries us to a new threshold in our relationship with cancer, strengthening our ability to meet it with courage, creativity, gratitude and grace. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Coughing for three weeks? Get out of breath easily? Do you have either of these symptoms? Tell your doctor'

Coughing for three weeks? Get out of breath easily? Do you have either of these symptoms? Tell your doctor (2016)

Department of Health

Leaflet aimed at alerting general public to symptoms of lung cancer and encouraging people to go to the doctor if they have a cough that last more than three weeks or get out of breath easily.

Cover image of 'In gratitude'

In gratitude (2016)

Bloomsbury Publishing

The future flashed before my eyes in all its pre-ordained banality. Embarrassment, at first, to the exclusion of all other feelings. But embarrassment curled at the edges with a weariness. I got a joke in. 'So - we'd better get cooking the meth,' I said to the Poet. In August 2014, Jenny Diski was diagnosed with inoperable lung cancer and given 'two or three years' to live. She didn't know how to react. All responses felt scripted, laden with cliché. Being a writer, she decided to write about it (grappling with the unoriginality even of this), and also to tell a story she has not yet told: that of being taken in, aged fifteen, by the author Doris Lessing, and the subsequent fifty years of their complex relationship. In September 2014 Jenny Diski began writing in the London Review of Books, describing her experience of living with terminal cancer, examining her life and history with Doris Lessing: the fairy-tale rescue from 'the bin' as a teenager, the difficulties of being absorbed into an unfamiliar family and the influence this had on her. Swooping from one memory to the next - alighting on the hysterical battlefield of her parental home, her expulsion from school, stacking shelves in Banbury and the drug-taking twenty-something in and out of psychiatric hospitals, Diski paints a portrait of two extraordinary writers - Lessing and herself. From one of our most original voices comes a book like no other: a cerebral, witty, dazzlingly candid masterpiece about an uneasy relationship; about memory and writing, ingratitude and anger; about living with illness and facing death. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'When breath becomes air'

When breath becomes air (2016)

The Bodley Head

At the age of thirty-six, on the verge of completing a decade’s worth of training as a neurosurgeon, Paul Kalanithi was diagnosed with stage IV lung cancer. One day he was a doctor treating the dying, and the next he was a patient struggling to live. And just like that, the future he and his wife had imagined evaporated. When Breath Becomes Air chronicles Kalanithi’s transformation from a naïve medical student “possessed,” as he wrote, “by the question of what, given that all organisms die, makes a virtuous and meaningful life” into a neurosurgeon at Stanford working in the brain, the most critical place for human identity, and finally into a patient and new father confronting his own mortality. What makes life worth living in the face of death? What do you do when the future, no longer a ladder toward your goals in life, flattens out into a perpetual present? What does it mean to have a child, to nurture a new life as another fades away? These are some of the questions Kalanithi wrestles with in this profoundly moving, exquisitely observed memoir. Paul Kalanithi died in March 2015, while working on this book, yet his words live on as a guide and a gift to us all. “I began to realize that coming face to face with my own mortality, in a sense, had changed nothing and everything,” he wrote. “Seven words from Samuel Beckett began to repeat in my head: ‘I can’t go on. I’ll go on.’” When Breath Becomes Air is an unforgettable, life-affirming reflection on the challenge of facing death and on the relationship between doctor and patient, from a brilliant writer who became both. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Have you had a cough for more than 3 weeks? Do you get out of breath easily?  [Easy read]'

Have you had a cough for more than 3 weeks? Do you get out of breath easily? [Easy read] (2016)

Public Health England

Leaflet aimed at alerting general public to symptoms of lung cancer and encouraging people to go to the doctor if they have a cough that last more than three weeks.

Cover image of 'Coughing for three weeks? Get out of breath easily? Do you have either of these symptoms? Tell your doctor [Large print]'

Coughing for three weeks? Get out of breath easily? Do you have either of these symptoms? Tell your doctor [Large print] (2016)

Department of Health

Leaflet aimed at alerting general public to symptoms of lung cancer and encouraging people to go to the doctor if they have a cough that last more than three weeks or get out of breath easily.

Cover image of 'Lung cancer'

Lung cancer (April 2015)

Cancer Focus Northern Ireland

Lists the risk factors for and the signs and symptoms of lung cancer and describes what to expect when visiting the GP. Also has information about how the Cancer Focus Northern Ireland can help.

Cover image of 'Going on holiday with a lung condition'

Going on holiday with a lung condition (2015)

British Lung Foundation

This booklet is part of the British Lung Foundation's travel pack (a set of four guides to holidaying in the UK or abroad). It aims to help people with a lung disease plan a holiday in the UK and abroad. It includes tips on choosing accommodation, travelling (by coach, train or ferry), driving abroad, flying with a lung condition, and getting oxygen away from home.

Cover image of 'Treating metastases. Advanced bowel cancer'

Treating metastases. Advanced bowel cancer (November 2015)

Beating Bowel Cancer

This booklet provides information for people whose bowel cancer has spread. 

Cover image of 'Mum's way'

Mum's way (2013)

Simon & Schuster UK

Angie and Ian were childhood sweethearts, Angie adored kids and, as one of eight children himself, Ian was only too happy to have as many as they could. After their marriage they had three sons in quick succession. But then, aged just thirty one, Angie was diagnosed with breast cancer and the couple had to accept they might not be able to have any more. Five years on, though, with Angie well again they went on to have five more. But in 2007, Angie had a shadow on her lung and it was the return of the original breast cancer she thought she had beaten. It seemed the disease had returned to tear their world apart again. Though Ian searched tirelessly for cures, Angie practised acceptance. She wouldn't live to see her children grow up. Raising eight children would be a big job for any couple; to raise them alone, without their mother, an almost Herculean feat. But this was exactly what Angie wanted Ian to be able to do. So in the last months of her life, Angie compiled a list of 'rules' to guide Ian in the future, and put him on an intensive training course, so he could learn all the skills he would need. She taught him how to make her special chicken curry, how to soothe away their hurts, pack their lunchboxes with all their favourites and do all the little things she'd done for them so unthinkingly. And Ian knew he wasn't just doing this for the children. He was doing it so his beloved wife could be comforted by knowing that he had the tools to bring their children up her way. Finally, inevitably, came the hardest task of all. Angie, the job done, had to find the courage to let them go, and Ian and the children the courage to carry on without her. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The yellow world. Trust your dreams and they'll come true'

The yellow world. Trust your dreams and they'll come true (2012)

Particular Books (Penguin Imprint)

Albert Espinosa never wanted to write a book about surviving cancer, so he didn't. He wrote a book instead about the Yellow World. What is the yellow world? The yellow world is a world that's within everyone's reach, a world the colour of the sun. It is the name of a way of living, of seeing life, of nourishing yourself with the lessons that you learn from good moments as well as bad ones. It is the world that makes you happy, the world you like living in. The yellow world has no rules; it is made of discoveries. In these 23 Discoveries Albert shows us how to connect daily reality with our most distant dreams. He tells us that 'losses are positive', 'the word 'pain' doesn't exist', and 'what you hide the most reveals the most about you'. Albert Espinosa has won several battles with death, which is why his stories are so full of life. He is powerful because he never gives up. And as a last resort he bargains: he swapped a leg and a lung for his life. He has learnt how to lose in order to win. He's hyperactive and prefers losing sleep to losing experiences. If you want to tell him something it has to be very good or told very fast. He loves to provoke people but he does it to make provocations seem normal. His greatest hope is that after you have read this book you will go off in search of your yellow world. Albert Espinosa is a bestselling author. At the age of thirteen, Albert was diagnosed with cancer, an event that changed his life forever. When he was fourteen, his left leg had to be amputated. At sixteen his left lung was removed, and when he was eighteen part of his liver was taken out. After ten years in and out of hospitals, when he was finally told that he had been cured of the disease, he realised that his illness had taught him that what is sad is not dying, but rather not knowing how to live. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Even the eyebrows. A practical guide to managing cancer with your boxing gloves on'

Even the eyebrows. A practical guide to managing cancer with your boxing gloves on (2009)

Self-published using AuthorHouse

When I was told I needed chemotherapy I froze with fear. The word itself has almost mystical powers, conjuring up vivid mental images of frail, shadow-like people curled up on beds, quietly writhing in agony and slowly losing the will to live. In truth I'd never really thought about what it actually was, I just knew it was bad. I asked my family and friends what they thought chemotherapy was and, bearing in mind how prevalent cancer is these days, the responses were as varied as they were downright peculiar: 'I've never actually been sure what's involved, but I know it's unpleasant.' 'It's a large machine you slide into, a bit like the old iron lung machine,' (does anyone remember the old iron lung machine?)' 'Every bit of your body's bombarded by deadly rays.' 'It's an injection that lasts for hours and hours.' Well, here are just four good reasons why I needed to dispel some ridiculous myths about cancer treatment. Even the eyebrows? is an honest account of what to expect before, during and after treatment, and a guide to making the journey as comfortable and calm as humanly possible. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'What can I do to help? 75 practical ideas for family and friends from cancer's frontline'

What can I do to help? 75 practical ideas for family and friends from cancer's frontline (2005)

Short Books

'I count myself the luckiest and unluckiest woman in London.' Deborah Hutton's discovery that the niggling cough which had been troubling her for a couple of months was actually an aggressive lung cancer that had already invaded her bones and lymphatic system marked the beginning of a brand-new learning curve - a personal odyssey that taught her to let go of her super-competent I-can-handle-it-myself persona and gratefully accept the huge amount of help beamed at her by her close-knit family and 'world class' network of friends and neighbours. From her own experience and out of her conversations with fellow members of the Cancer Club - 'the only club I can think of which is both rigorously exclusive and which has no waiting list, ever' - comes this anthology of supremely practical examples of ways in which friends and family, often themselves reeling from the shock of the diagnosis and feeling just as helpless and at a loss as to know what to do, can make a real, substantial difference. 'What can I do to help?' she writes. Well, stand by, because the answer is 'Plenty'. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Mesothelioma. What you need to know'

Mesothelioma. What you need to know (November 2017)

British Lung Foundation

This leaflet is for people who have been diagnosed with mesothelioma. It explains what mesothelioma is, what causes it, symptoms, how it is diagnosed, and treatments. It also provides information on where to go for further information and support.

Cover image of 'Radiotherapy after breast surgery. A guide for patients and their families'

Radiotherapy after breast surgery. A guide for patients and their families (February 2020)

Christie Hospital NHS Trust

This booklet explains what radiotherapy is, when it will begin, in-patient and outpatient treatment, how treatment is planned, what happens during treatment, possible side-effects, and what happens when treatment ends. It also has sources of further information and support.

Cover image of 'Where to get help. A guide to services'

Where to get help. A guide to services (November 2019)

Christie Hospital NHS Trust

Although designed primarily for people having treatment at the Christie Hospital, this booklet is relevant to anyone with cancer. It describes the emotional support, palliative care, and financial help available. It has a list of national support groups and also support groups in the northwest.

Cover image of 'Cervical cancer. The facts'

Cervical cancer. The facts (March 2017)

Jo's Cervical Cancer Trust

Credit-card leaflet with facts about cervical cancer, including incidence, the symptoms to look out for, how to reduce the risk, and cervical screening.

Cover image of 'Eating – help yourself. A guide for patients and their carers'

Eating – help yourself. A guide for patients and their carers (February 2019)

Christie Hospital NHS Trust

Eating may be a problem for people with cancer or other illnesses, particularly when undergoing treatment such as radiotherapy or chemotherapy. This booklet has advice on how to eat well when trying to cope with loss of appetite, changes in taste, dry mouth, difficulties swallowing, feeling full, nausea, diarrhoea, and constipation. It has tips on how to make food as nourishing as possible and ideas for snacks and drinks.

Cover image of 'What does it mean?'

What does it mean? (2019)

BUPA

This booklet explains what cancer is and explores some common worries and feelings that children may have - reassuring them that however they react, it’s ok.

Cover image of 'Sun safety and skin cancer. The facts, prevention and early detection'

Sun safety and skin cancer. The facts, prevention and early detection (2019)

SKCIN: The Karen Clifford Skin Cancer Charity

Leaflet with information about skin cancer and how to avoid it, including: sunburn; sunbeds; protecting young children; choosing the right sunscreen; applying sunscreen; at risk groups; types of skin cancer.

Cover image of 'Visiting hospital'

Visiting hospital (2019)

BUPA

This booklet explains types of treatment and some of the health professionals who are helping people with cancer to get better. 

Cover image of 'My brother or sister has cancer. A children's guide to coping with cancer'

My brother or sister has cancer. A children's guide to coping with cancer (August 2016)

Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group

This illustrated booklet tells the story of siblings Tom and Jess, whose little brother Ben has cancer. It describes how they cope with the illness and the changes it brings. It is aimed at children under nine.

Cover image of 'Eating well when following a low fibre diet. A guide for patients and their carers'

Eating well when following a low fibre diet. A guide for patients and their carers (January 2019)

Christie Hospital NHS Trust

Some people may be advised to follow a low-fibre diet during or after treatment for cancer. This booklet gives ideas of suitable foods and advice for improving the nutritional value of meals; this may be helpful for people who have a poor appetite or who have lost weight.

Cover image of 'Cervical cancer'

Cervical cancer (March 2017)

Jo's Cervical Cancer Trust

This booklet describes what cervical cancer is, the symptoms, causes, the different types and (briefly) the treatment options.

Cover image of 'A laryngectomee's travel guide to the British Isles'

A laryngectomee's travel guide to the British Isles (2017)

Cancer Laryngectomee Trust

This booklet has details of hospitals believed to handle emergencies of the type that laryngectomees may suffer. It includes flash cards (English, French, Spanish, and German) to help a voiceless laryngectomee indicate what the problem is.

Cover image of 'Bisphosphonates for advanced prostate cancer'

Bisphosphonates for advanced prostate cancer (May 2018)

Prostate Cancer UK

Bisphosphonates are a group of drugs that can be used to treat prostate cancer that has spread to the bones (advanced prostate cancer). This factsheet describes how bisphosphonates work, the advantages and disadvantages, what treatment involves and the possible side effects.

Cover image of 'Human papillomavirus (HPV)'

Human papillomavirus (HPV) (March 2017)

Jo's Cervical Cancer Trust

This booklet explains what HPV (human papillomavirus) is and the link with cervical cancer. It describes how HPV is transmitted, how to reduce the risk, and testing for HPV.

Cover image of 'Cervical screening (smear test)'

Cervical screening (smear test) (March 2017)

Jo's Cervical Cancer Trust

This booklet explains what cervical screening is, who is eligible, the test itself, and what happens if the result is abnormal.

Cover image of 'Human papillomavirus (HPV). The facts'

Human papillomavirus (HPV). The facts (March 2017)

Jo's Cervical Cancer Trust

Credit-card leaflet with facts about HPV, high risk HPV and cervical cancer, contracting high risk HPV and how to reduce your risk. It also describes the services that Jo's Cervical Cancer Trust offers to anyone concerned about HPV, cervical screening, cervical abnormalities and cervical cancer.

Cover image of 'HPV testing'

HPV testing (March 2017)

Jo's Cervical Cancer Trust

HPV (human papillomavirus) testing has been introduced in the UK as part of the National Cervical Screening Programme. This booklet describes what HPV is, how it is transmitted, how the test is carried out and what happens if the result is positive.

Cover image of 'Eating well following treatment and recovery from cancer. A guide for patients and carers'

Eating well following treatment and recovery from cancer. A guide for patients and carers (February 2016)

Christie Hospital NHS Trust

Advice about what to eat and what not to eat following treatment. 

Cover image of 'Prostate biopsy results: PIN and ASAP'

Prostate biopsy results: PIN and ASAP (August 2017)

Prostate Cancer UK

A factsheet for men who have been diagnosed with high-grade prostatic intrapeithelial neoplasia (PIN) or atypical small acinar proliferation (ASAP) after having a prostate biopsy. It explains what ASAP and 'high-grade' PIN are and how they might be monitored.

Sorry, no publications found.
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