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The web Directory of Information Materials for People Affected by Cancer is regularly updated and currently has details of over 1,900 booklets, leaflets, books and audiovisual materials for people affected by cancer. Most have been published in the last five years but we have included some older ones that are still useful.

Results: 71

Cover image of 'Prostate conditions and erectile dysfunction'

Prostate conditions and erectile dysfunction (August 2013)

Prostate Scotland

This leaflet explains why erectile dysfunction may occur following treatment for prostate cancer, how it can be treated and how men can help themselves by making lifestyle changes.

Cover image of 'How to stop smoking. It's never too late to  quit'

How to stop smoking. It's never too late to quit (July 2013)

British Lung Foundation

This booklet explains the benefits of stopping smoking and the steps you can take to quit. It will help you improve your health and quality of life for the future. 

Cover image of 'Surviving triple-negative breast cancer. Hope, treatment and recovery'

Surviving triple-negative breast cancer. Hope, treatment and recovery (2013)

Oxford University Press

After her diagnosis of triple negative breast cancer (TNBC), health journalist Patricia Prijatel did what any reporter would do: start investigating the disease, how it occurs, and how it's treated. While she learned that important research was emerging, she found a noticeable lack of resources on the disease, which affects 70,000 women a year and differs from hormone-positive breast cancer in important ways, including prognosis and treatment options. Hormone negative breast cancer disproportionately affects younger women and African-American women - and it can be more dangerous than other types of breast cancer. But there are many reasons to be hopeful, as Prijatel learned. Through her blog, Positives About Negative, she has met hundreds of women who have told her their stories and shared their fears, confusion, and frustration. After her recovery, she began writing this book to provide the first dedicated resource for women diagnosed with TNBC. Surviving Triple Negative Breast Cancer delivers research-based information on the biology of TNBC; the role of genetics, family history, and race; how to navigate treatment options; and a plethora of strategies to reduce the risk of recurrence, including diet and lifestyle changes. In clear, approachable language, Prijatel provides an accessible guide to understanding a pathology report and a vast array of scientific studies. Woven throughout the book are stories of women who have faced TNBC. These are mothers, wives, daughters, and sisters who went through a variety of medical treatments and then got on with life — one competes in triathlons, two had babies after being treated with chemo, one got remarried in her 50s, and one just celebrated the 30th birthday of the son she was nursing when she was diagnosed. With honesty and humor, Prijatel's inspiring story shows the heart of a survivor. Her message is that TNBC is a disease to take seriously, with proper and occasionally aggressive treatment, but it is not automatically a killer. Most women diagnosed with the disease do survive. Surviving Triple Negative Breast Cancer is a roadmap for women who want to be empowered through their treatment and recovery. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Navigating life with a brain tumour'

Navigating life with a brain tumour (2013)

Oxford University Press

Navigating Life with a Brain Tumor is a guide for anyone affected by brain tumors and their associated conditions - patients, family members, friends, and caregivers. Providing readily accessible information and real-world encouragement to people living with primary and metastatic brain tumors and their caregivers, this book discusses the basics of brain tumors, types of tumors, management of different tumors, related symptoms, treatments and side effects, the role of medical team members, and coping strategies from initial diagnosis throughout the course of the illness. At the same time, it also offers practical suggestions on symptom management and lifestyle modification, as well as real-life anecdotes and advice from both patients and family members and friends who are experiencing this diagnosis. Balancing the uncertainties of prognosis with hope, Navigating Life with a Brain Tumor is an authoritative, realistic, yet compassionate guide to living with brain cancer. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Confronting hereditary breast and ovarian cancer. Identify your risk, understand your options, change your destiny'

Confronting hereditary breast and ovarian cancer. Identify your risk, understand your options, change your destiny (2012)

Johns Hopkins University Press

If you are concerned that the cancer in your family is hereditary, you face difficult choices. Should you have a blood test that may reveal whether you have a high likelihood of disease? Do you pre-emptively treat a disease that may never develop? How do you make decisions now that will affect the rest of your life? This helpful, informative guide answers your questions as you confront hereditary breast and ovarian cancer. Developed by Facing Our Risk of Cancer Empowered (FORCE), the nation's only nonprofit organization dedicated to supporting families affected by hereditary breast and ovarian cancer, this book stands alone among breast and ovarian cancer resources. Equal parts health guide and memoir, it defines complex issues facing previvors and survivors and provides solutions with a fresh, authoritative voice. Written by three passionate advocates for the hereditary cancer community who are themselves breast cancer survivors, Confronting Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer dispels myths and misinformation and presents practical risk-reducing alternatives and decision-making tools. Including information about genetic counseling and testing, preventive surgery, and fertility and family planning, as well as explanations of health insurance coverage and laws protecting genetic privacy, this resource tackles head-on the challenges of living in a high-risk body. Confronting hereditary cancer is a complex, confusing, and highly individual journey. With its unique combination of the latest research, expert advice, and compelling personal stories, this book gives previvors, survivors, and their family members the guidance they need to face the unique challenges of hereditary cancer. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The whole-food guide for breast cancer survivors'

The whole-food guide for breast cancer survivors (2012)

New Harbinger

Millions of breast cancer survivors have two things in common: a renewed gratitude for their good health and a recharged commitment to taking care of their bodies. The Whole-Food Guide for Breast Cancer Survivors is an integrative, whole foods guide to rebuilding health after surviving breast cancer and reducing the chance of breast cancer reoccurrence. Although cancer does have a significant genetic component, lifestyle factors such as nutrition also play a role in determining the likelihood that cancer will reappear. This program helps readers get the nutrition they need in order to keep breast cancer at bay, with specific guidance for managing hormone levels with food. The guide also explains how nutritional deficiencies, environmental factors, and antioxidants affect cancer's ability to attack the body. Using holistic health and nutrition leader Edward Bauman's Eating for Health model, readers learn to eat for pleasure, eat for energy, eat for recovery, and eat for health in order to starve cancer and enjoy stronger, healthier bodies. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Why millions survive cancer. The successes of science'

Why millions survive cancer. The successes of science (2011)

Oxford University Press

The enormous recent progress in fighting cancer, and the science behind it, is revealed fully for the first time in this book. The disease affects one in three over a lifetime but today more and more people are surviving as a result of the extraordinary and little known advances of science and medicine. Using scientific evidence from world cancer experts, Lauren Pecorino helps us understand the biology of cancer, the recent trends in cancer progress, and the rationale behind new cancer treatments. With recommendations about lifestyle choices that can help reduce some of the risks of getting cancer, Pecorino looks to the future in our battle with this disease. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'A woman's disease. The history of cervical cancer'

A woman's disease. The history of cervical cancer (2011)

Oxford University Press

Cervical cancer is an emotive disease with multiple connotations. It has stood for the horror of cancer, the curse of femininity, the hope of cutting-edge medical technologies and the promise of screening for malignant tumours. For a long time, this disease was identified with the most dreaded aspects of malignancies: prolonged invalidity and chronic pain, but also physical degradation, shame and social isolation. Cervical cancer displayed in parallel the dangers of being a woman. In the 20th century, innovations initially developed to control cervical cancer - radiotherapy and radium therapy, exfoliate cytology (Pap smear), homogenisation of the 'staging' of tumours, mass campaigns for an early detection of precancerous lesions of the cervix - set standards for diagnosis, treatment and prevention of other malignancies. In the late 20th century, cervical cancer underwent another important change. With the display of the role of selected strands of HPV (Human Papilloma Virus) in the genesis of this malignancy, it was transformed into a sexually transmitted disease. This new understanding of cervical cancer linked it more firmly with lifestyle choices, and thus increased the danger of stigmatisation of patients; on the other hand it opened the possibility for efficient prevention of this malignancy through vaccination. Ilana Lowy follows the disease from antiquity to the 21st century, focussing on the period since the mid-19th century, during which cervical cancer was dissociated from other gynaecological disorders and became a distinct entity. Following the ways in which new developments in science, medicine, and society have affected beliefs about medical progress and an individual's responsibility, gender roles, reproduction, and sex, Lowy demonstrates our understanding of what cervical cancer is, and how it can be prevented and cured. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Pink ribbon blues. How breast cancer culture undermines women's health'

Pink ribbon blues. How breast cancer culture undermines women's health (2011)

Oxford University Press

Pink ribbon paraphernalia saturate shopping malls, billboards, magazines, television, and other venues, all in the name of breast cancer awareness. In this compelling and provocative work, Gayle Sulik shows that though this 'pink ribbon culture' has brought breast cancer advocacy much attention, it has not had the desired effect of improving women's health. It may, in fact, have done the opposite. Based on eight years of research, analysis of advertisements and breast cancer awareness campaigns, and hundreds of interviews with those affected by the disease, Pink Ribbon Blues highlights the hidden costs of the pink ribbon as an industry, one in which breast cancer has become merely a brand name with a pink logo. Indeed, while survivors and supporters walk, run, and purchase ribbons for a cure, cancer rates rise, the cancer industry thrives, corporations claim responsible citizenship while profiting from the disease, and breast cancer is stigmatized anew for those who reject the pink ribbon model. But Sulik also outlines alternative organizations that make a real difference, highlights what they do differently, and presents a new agenda for the future. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Knowledge empowers. Don't get caught outAn awareness presentation'

Knowledge empowers. Don't get caught outAn awareness presentation (2010)

PCaSO Prostate Cancer Support Network

A DVD with information about prostate cancer as follows: Prostate basics; The prostate; Age; Seeing your GP; Active surveillance; Can prostate cancer be avoided?; Risk factors and symptoms; Common problems; Ethnicity; Explaining all symptoms and concerns; Watchful waiting; Comparison between Eastern and Western diets; Testing and referral; Significance of prostate cancer; Diet and lifestyle; Asking for a PSA test; Surgery, radiotherapy, HIFU, cryotherapy, PDT; World-wide evidence; Treatment options; Family connections; Note the result; Hormone therapy; What's involved?; Diet, nutrition and lifestyle guidance; Chemotherapy; Lifestyle guidance.

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