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The web Directory of Information Materials for People Affected by Cancer is regularly updated and currently has details of over 1,900 booklets, leaflets, books and audiovisual materials for people affected by cancer. Most have been published in the last five years but we have included some older ones that are still useful.

Results: 82

Cover image of 'Life after cancer treatment'

Life after cancer treatment (June 2017)

Macmillan Cancer Support

This booklet is for people who are preparing for life after treatment. It has information on follow-up care, managing treatment effects and making healthy lifestyle changes.

Cover image of 'The next stage. Recovery and adjustment'

The next stage. Recovery and adjustment (June 2017)

Leukaemia CARE

This booklet is for people adjusting to life after diagnosis and treatment of a blood cancer.

Cover image of 'You can be smoke free'

You can be smoke free (April 2017)

Cancer Research UK

Information on smoking, including what it does to the body, what cigarettes contain, and giving up for good.

Cover image of 'Living with an illness that you will probably die from. How to keep comfortable, healthy and happy [Easy read]'

Living with an illness that you will probably die from. How to keep comfortable, healthy and happy [Easy read] (June 2017)

Marie Curie

This Easy Read booklet is for people living with an illness that they will probably die from. It tells them about how to keep comfortable, healthy and happy.

Cover image of 'What to do after cancer treatment ends: 10 top tips [Welsh]'

What to do after cancer treatment ends: 10 top tips [Welsh] (May 2017)

Macmillan Cancer Support

Suggestions to help people get the best care and support after treatment ends and to live as healthy and active a life as possible.

Cover image of 'Fast facts: Prostate cancer'

Fast facts: Prostate cancer (2017)

Health Press

Prostate cancer is a fast-changing field, and recent advances have significantly improved both the survival and quality of life of many men diagnosed with the disease. As well as providing comprehensive information on the diagnosis, staging and management of the disease, the eighth edition of this ever-popular handbook is an invaluable update on new developments, including: evidence for the debate surrounding PSA screening; a better understanding of molecular and genetic advances; the latest methods of delivering radiotherapy; new drug treatments for castrate-resistant prostate cancer; and survivorship issues. This superbly illustrated handbook is a practical resource for all those who provide support and care for men with prostate cancer - including GPs, nurses and allied health professionals - as well as a refreshingly readable source of information for patients wanting to know more about their condition and its treatment. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The finch in my brain'

The finch in my brain (2017)

Hodder & Stoughton

When film producer Martino Sclavi began experiencing intense headaches, he attributed them to his frenetic lifestyle. As it turned out, he had grade 4 brain cancer and was given 18 months to live. After undergoing brain surgery - while awake - Martino found he had lost the ability to recognise words. His response was to close his eyes and begin to move his fingers across the keyboard to write this, an account of life before diagnosis and since. Defying all predictions Martino is still very much alive, words read out to him by the monotone of a computerised voice he calls Alex. But he must now live in a new way. This book - that he has written but cannot read - charts the effects of his experience: on his relationship with his young son, his marriage, his work and with himself. In the wake of his illness, everything must be reconfigured and Martino is made to question the habits, dreams and beliefs of his old life and confront the present. What he finds is strange and beautiful. Searching for the words between life and death, Sclavi shows that with determination and a subtle, persistent sense of humour, it is possible to change the story of our lives. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Giving up smoking'

Giving up smoking (June 2017)

Macmillan Cancer Support

A booklet for people who are living with, or after, cancer and who would like to give up smoking. It has information about the benefits of quitting, and practical advice about how to stop smoking and stay stopped.

Cover image of 'Signs and symptoms of cancer and how to reduce your risk'

Signs and symptoms of cancer and how to reduce your risk (March 2017)

Macmillan Cancer Support

This leaflet explains how to recognise the early signs of cancer and how to reduce the risk. It describes the symptoms to look out for (unexplained bleeding, weight loss, lumps, pain) and how to reduce the risk by making lifestyle changes (smoking, diet, exercise, alcohol drinking and taking care in the sun).

Cover image of 'Want to cut your cancer risk?'

Want to cut your cancer risk? (April 2017)

Cancer Research UK

Information about how lifestyle choices can reduce cancer risk: not smoking; keeping a healthy weight; drinking less alcohol; keeping active; a healthy diet; and safer sex.

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