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The web Directory of Information Materials for People Affected by Cancer is regularly updated and currently has details of over 1,900 booklets, leaflets, books and audiovisual materials for people affected by cancer. Most have been published in the last five years but we have included some older ones that are still useful.

Results: 80

Cover image of 'Giving up smoking'

Giving up smoking (June 2017)

Macmillan Cancer Support

A booklet for people who are living with, or after, cancer and who would like to give up smoking. It has information about the benefits of quitting, and practical advice about how to stop smoking and stay stopped.

Cover image of 'Chemo summer. An uplifting breast cancer experience [currently being reviewed by our volunteers]'

Chemo summer. An uplifting breast cancer experience [currently being reviewed by our volunteers] (2017)

Austin Macauley

In Chemo Summer Jane Hoggar takes the reader through a light-hearted and informative account of her discovery of breast cancer and its cure. Cancer of any description has the capacity to chill those it affects and their loved ones. But for Jane Hoggar early discovery and diagnosis provided for a satisfactory resolution. And it's these small details that might well help people in a similar situation. For example, Jane did not discover a lump, which is the usual thing in breast cancer, but a sag' when she raised her arms and it was her insistence that something was wrong that resulted in a vital early medical diagnosis. All the side issues are covered in the book, effects of chemo and radiotherapy, hair loss and wigs, changes in diet and exercise, making Chemo Summer a valuable and engaging look into a serious and often frightening subject. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Eating well. Living with bowel cancer'

Eating well. Living with bowel cancer (June 2017)

Beating Bowel Cancer

Food and diet can cause problems following treatment for bowel cancer. This booklet describes the side-effects of treatment (sore mouth, dry mouth, wind, nausea and vomiting) and suggests ways to help deal with them. It also has practical advice about maintaining a healthy diet, living with a colostomy, work and social life, travel and eating out.

Cover image of 'Living with an illness that you will probably die from. How to keep comfortable, healthy and happy [Easy read]'

Living with an illness that you will probably die from. How to keep comfortable, healthy and happy [Easy read] (June 2017)

Marie Curie

This Easy Read booklet is for people living with an illness that they will probably die from. It tells them about how to keep comfortable, healthy and happy.

Cover image of 'The finch in my brain'

The finch in my brain (2017)

Hodder & Stoughton

When film producer Martino Sclavi began experiencing intense headaches, he attributed them to his frenetic lifestyle. As it turned out, he had grade 4 brain cancer and was given 18 months to live. After undergoing brain surgery - while awake - Martino found he had lost the ability to recognise words. His response was to close his eyes and begin to move his fingers across the keyboard to write this, an account of life before diagnosis and since. Defying all predictions Martino is still very much alive, words read out to him by the monotone of a computerised voice he calls Alex. But he must now live in a new way. This book - that he has written but cannot read - charts the effects of his experience: on his relationship with his young son, his marriage, his work and with himself. In the wake of his illness, everything must be reconfigured and Martino is made to question the habits, dreams and beliefs of his old life and confront the present. What he finds is strange and beautiful. Searching for the words between life and death, Sclavi shows that with determination and a subtle, persistent sense of humour, it is possible to change the story of our lives. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Ten top tips for a healthy weight'

Ten top tips for a healthy weight (July 2017)

Cancer Research UK

Tips, based on scientific evidence, to help people control their weight by taking in fewer calories and using more energy. 

Cover image of 'Want to cut your cancer risk?'

Want to cut your cancer risk? (April 2017)

Cancer Research UK

Information about how lifestyle choices can reduce cancer risk: not smoking; keeping a healthy weight; drinking less alcohol; keeping active; a healthy diet; and safer sex.

Cover image of 'Signs and symptoms of cancer and how to reduce your risk'

Signs and symptoms of cancer and how to reduce your risk (March 2017)

Macmillan Cancer Support

This leaflet explains how to recognise the early signs of cancer and how to reduce the risk. It describes the symptoms to look out for (unexplained bleeding, weight loss, lumps, pain) and how to reduce the risk by making lifestyle changes (smoking, diet, exercise, alcohol drinking and taking care in the sun).

Cover image of 'What to do after cancer treatment ends: 10 top tips'

What to do after cancer treatment ends: 10 top tips (May 2017)

Macmillan Cancer Support

Suggestions to help people get the best care and support after treatment ends and to live as healthy and active a life as possible.

Cover image of 'Healthy eating and cancer'

Healthy eating and cancer (August 2017)

Macmillan Cancer Support

Many people want to make positive changes to their lives when they have been diagnosed with cancer. Taking steps to live a healthier lifestyle is often a major part of these changes. This booklet is for people living with cancer or after cancer treatment who want to know more about a healthy diet. It explains why diet is important and has tips on how to eat well and keep to a healthy weight. It also answers some common questions about diet and cancer.

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