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The web Directory of Information Materials for People Affected by Cancer is regularly updated and currently has details of over 1,900 booklets, leaflets, books and audiovisual materials for people affected by cancer. Most have been published in the last five years but we have included some older ones that are still useful.

Results: 24

Cover image of 'Get protected against cancers caused by HPV'

Get protected against cancers caused by HPV (2019)

NHS Health Scotland

From academic year 2019/20, every S1 pupil, regardless of gender, can get the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine for free. This leaflet is about the HPV immunisation, which is offered to boys and girls to protect them against head and neck, cervical and anogenital cancers. 

Cover image of 'Get protected against cancers caused by HPV [Polish]'

Get protected against cancers caused by HPV [Polish] (2019)

NHS Health Scotland

From academic year 2019/20, every S1 pupil, regardless of gender, can get the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine for free. This leaflet is about the HPV immunisation, which is offered to boys and girls to protect them against head and neck, cervical and anogenital cancers. 

Cover image of 'Get protected against cancers caused by HPV [Arabic]'

Get protected against cancers caused by HPV [Arabic] (2019)

NHS Health Scotland

From academic year 2019/20, every S1 pupil, regardless of gender, can get the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine for free. This leaflet is about the HPV immunisation, which is offered to boys and girls to protect them against head and neck, cervical and anogenital cancers. 

Cover image of 'Get protected against cancers caused by HPV [Chinese, Simplified]'

Get protected against cancers caused by HPV [Chinese, Simplified] (2019)

NHS Health Scotland

From academic year 2019/20, every S1 pupil, regardless of gender, can get the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine for free. This leaflet is about the HPV immunisation, which is offered to boys and girls to protect them against head and neck, cervical and anogenital cancers. 

Cover image of 'The HPV vaccine for men who have sex with men'

The HPV vaccine for men who have sex with men (2019)

NHS Health Scotland

This leaflet is about the HPV vaccine for men who have sex with men to help protect against four types of HPV that can cause cancer and genital warts.

Cover image of 'The HPV vaccine for men who have sex with men [Chinese, Simplified]'

The HPV vaccine for men who have sex with men [Chinese, Simplified] (2019)

NHS Health Scotland

This leaflet is about the HPV vaccine for men who have sex with men to help protect against four types of HPV that can cause cancer and genital warts.

Cover image of 'The HPV vaccine for men who have sex with men [Urdu]'

The HPV vaccine for men who have sex with men [Urdu] (2019)

NHS Health Scotland

This leaflet is about the HPV vaccine for men who have sex with men to help protect against four types of HPV that can cause cancer and genital warts.

Cover image of 'The HPV vaccine for men who have sex with men [Polish]'

The HPV vaccine for men who have sex with men [Polish] (2019)

NHS Health Scotland

This leaflet is about the HPV vaccine for men who have sex with men to help protect against four types of HPV that can cause cancer and genital warts.

Cover image of 'Get protected against cancers caused by HPV [Easy read]'

Get protected against cancers caused by HPV [Easy read] (2019)

NHS Health Scotland

From academic year 2019/20, every S1 pupil, regardless of gender, can get the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine for free. This leaflet is about the HPV immunisation, which is offered to boys and girls to protect them against head and neck, cervical and anogenital cancers. 

Cover image of 'Know your body. Spot cancer early. Cervical cancer'

Know your body. Spot cancer early. Cervical cancer (May 2018)

Cancer Research UK

This leaflet contains information about how cervical screening can detect early changes in the cervix before they develop into cancer. It also provides information about factors affecting the risk of cervical cancer.

Cover image of 'The HPV vaccine for men who have sex with men [Easy read]'

The HPV vaccine for men who have sex with men [Easy read] (2018)

NHS Health Scotland

This leaflet is about the HPV vaccine for men who have sex with men to help protect against four types of HPV that can cause cancer and genital warts.

Cover image of 'Human papillomavirus (HPV). The facts'

Human papillomavirus (HPV). The facts (March 2017)

Jo's Cervical Cancer Trust

Credit-card leaflet with facts about HPV, high risk HPV and cervical cancer, contracting high risk HPV and how to reduce your risk. It also describes the services that Jo's Cervical Cancer Trust offers to anyone concerned about HPV, cervical screening, cervical abnormalities and cervical cancer.

Cover image of 'Human papillomavirus (HPV)'

Human papillomavirus (HPV) (March 2017)

Jo's Cervical Cancer Trust

This booklet explains what HPV (human papillomavirus) is and the link with cervical cancer. It describes how HPV is transmitted, how to reduce the risk, and testing for HPV.

Cover image of 'HPV vaccine'

HPV vaccine (March 2017)

Jo's Cervical Cancer Trust

This booklet describes HPV (human papillomavirus) and how the vaccine works. It explains where girls can get the vaccine, how effective it is and the possible side effects.

Cover image of 'HPV testing'

HPV testing (March 2017)

Jo's Cervical Cancer Trust

HPV (human papillomavirus) testing has been introduced in the UK as part of the National Cervical Screening Programme. This booklet describes what HPV is, how it is transmitted, how the test is carried out and what happens if the result is positive.

Cover image of 'Your smear test after treatment [Chinese, Traditional]'

Your smear test after treatment [Chinese, Traditional] (2017)

NHS Health Scotland

This leaflet describes cervical screening tests after treatment for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). It explains what CIN is, what happens after treatment, and why women are now tested for HPV six months after treatment for CIN.

Cover image of 'Your smear test after treatment [Urdu]'

Your smear test after treatment [Urdu] (2017)

NHS Health Scotland

This leaflet describes cervical screening tests after treatment for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). It explains what CIN is, what happens after treatment, and why women are now tested for HPV six months after treatment for CIN.

Cover image of 'Your smear test - after CIN treatment [Easy read]'

Your smear test - after CIN treatment [Easy read] (2017)

NHS Health Scotland

This leaflet describes cervical screening tests after treatment for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). It explains what CIN is, what happens after treatment, and why women are now tested for HPV six months after treatment for CIN.

Cover image of 'Your smear test after treatment [Polish]'

Your smear test after treatment [Polish] (2017)

NHS Health Scotland

This leaflet describes cervical screening tests after treatment for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). It explains what CIN is, what happens after treatment, and why women are now tested for HPV six months after treatment for CIN.

Cover image of 'The facts about HPV'

The facts about HPV (2017)

Jo's Cervical Cancer Trust

A short film about HPV to dispel some of the myths surrounding the virus. It is hoped that it will help more people understand what the virus is, who can get it, how it can affect them, and what they can do to best protect themselves from cervical cancer. 

Cover image of 'Cervical screening and human papillomavirus (HPV) testing'

Cervical screening and human papillomavirus (HPV) testing (2016)

Public Health England

This leaflet tells you about HPV testing. This is a test carried out on the sample of cells taken during cervical screening. It makes no difference to what happens at your screening appointment. 

Cover image of 'Your guide to cervical screening (smear test)'

Your guide to cervical screening (smear test) (June 2015)

Jo's Cervical Cancer Trust

Every day eight women are diagnosed with cervical cancer and three die from the disease. Yet cervical cancer is largely preventable thanks to the NHS cervical screening programme and HPV vaccination programme. In the UK 22% of UK women do not attend their cervical screening (smear test) invitation. This short film aims to give you more information about smear tests: what the test is for and what will happen during the test. It also has information on Human Papillomavirus (HPV), a virus which is the main cause of cervical cancer and cervical abnormalities. The DVD (£5.00) includes versions in Arabic, Bengali Standard, Bengali Sylheti, Chinese, Hindi, Polish, Tamil, and Urdu. You can also watch all versions online.

Cover image of 'Your guide to the HPV vaccination from September 2012'

Your guide to the HPV vaccination from September 2012 (February 2012)

Department of Health

Guidance for teenage girls about the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination. The leaflet briefly describes cervical cancer, HPV and how it spreads, how the vaccination is given and some of the possible side-effects. It also answers some frequently asked questions.

Cover image of 'A woman's disease. The history of cervical cancer'

A woman's disease. The history of cervical cancer (2011)

Oxford University Press

Cervical cancer is an emotive disease with multiple connotations. It has stood for the horror of cancer, the curse of femininity, the hope of cutting-edge medical technologies and the promise of screening for malignant tumours. For a long time, this disease was identified with the most dreaded aspects of malignancies: prolonged invalidity and chronic pain, but also physical degradation, shame and social isolation. Cervical cancer displayed in parallel the dangers of being a woman. In the 20th century, innovations initially developed to control cervical cancer - radiotherapy and radium therapy, exfoliate cytology (Pap smear), homogenisation of the 'staging' of tumours, mass campaigns for an early detection of precancerous lesions of the cervix - set standards for diagnosis, treatment and prevention of other malignancies. In the late 20th century, cervical cancer underwent another important change. With the display of the role of selected strands of HPV (Human Papilloma Virus) in the genesis of this malignancy, it was transformed into a sexually transmitted disease. This new understanding of cervical cancer linked it more firmly with lifestyle choices, and thus increased the danger of stigmatisation of patients; on the other hand it opened the possibility for efficient prevention of this malignancy through vaccination. Ilana Lowy follows the disease from antiquity to the 21st century, focussing on the period since the mid-19th century, during which cervical cancer was dissociated from other gynaecological disorders and became a distinct entity. Following the ways in which new developments in science, medicine, and society have affected beliefs about medical progress and an individual's responsibility, gender roles, reproduction, and sex, Lowy demonstrates our understanding of what cervical cancer is, and how it can be prevented and cured. (Publisher)

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