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The web Directory of Information Materials for People Affected by Cancer is regularly updated and currently has details of over 1,900 booklets, leaflets, books and audiovisual materials for people affected by cancer. Most have been published in the last five years but we have included some older ones that are still useful.

Results: 28

Cover image of 'HPV vaccine. Help protect yourself against cervical cancer [Urdu]'

HPV vaccine. Help protect yourself against cervical cancer [Urdu] (2018)

NHS Health Scotland

A guide to the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine. It describes what cervical cancer is, HPV and how it is spread, and how and when the vaccine is given. It also covers consent, and possible side effects.

Cover image of 'HPV vaccine. Help protect yourself against cervical cancer [Hungarian]'

HPV vaccine. Help protect yourself against cervical cancer [Hungarian] (2018)

NHS Health Scotland

A guide to the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine. It describes what cervical cancer is, HPV and how it is spread, and how and when the vaccine is given. It also covers consent, and possible side effects.

Cover image of 'HPV vaccine. Help protect yourself against cervical cancer [Arabic]'

HPV vaccine. Help protect yourself against cervical cancer [Arabic] (2018)

NHS Health Scotland

A guide to the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine. It describes what cervical cancer is, HPV and how it is spread, and how and when the vaccine is given. It also covers consent, and possible side effects.

Cover image of 'HPV vaccine. Help protect yourself against cervical cancer'

HPV vaccine. Help protect yourself against cervical cancer (2018)

NHS Health Scotland

A guide to the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine. It describes what cervical cancer is, HPV and how it is spread, and how and when the vaccine is given. It also covers consent, and possible side effects.

Cover image of 'HPV vaccine. Help protect yourself against cervical cancer [Chinese, Traditional]'

HPV vaccine. Help protect yourself against cervical cancer [Chinese, Traditional] (2018)

NHS Health Scotland

A guide to the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine. It describes what cervical cancer is, HPV and how it is spread, and how and when the vaccine is given. It also covers consent, and possible side effects.

Cover image of 'Know your body. Spot cancer early. Cervical cancer'

Know your body. Spot cancer early. Cervical cancer (May 2018)

Cancer Research UK

This leaflet contains information about how cervical screening can detect early changes in the cervix before they develop into cancer. It also provides information about factors affecting the risk of cervical cancer.

Cover image of 'Human papillomavirus (HPV). The facts'

Human papillomavirus (HPV). The facts (March 2017)

Jo's Cervical Cancer Trust

Credit-card leaflet with facts about HPV, high risk HPV and cervical cancer, contracting high risk HPV and how to reduce your risk. It also describes the services that Jo's Cervical Cancer Trust offers to anyone concerned about HPV, cervical screening, cervical abnormalities and cervical cancer.

Cover image of 'Human papillomavirus (HPV)'

Human papillomavirus (HPV) (March 2017)

Jo's Cervical Cancer Trust

This booklet explains what HPV (human papillomavirus) is and the link with cervical cancer. It describes how HPV is transmitted, how to reduce the risk, and testing for HPV.

Cover image of 'HPV testing'

HPV testing (March 2017)

Jo's Cervical Cancer Trust

HPV (human papillomavirus) testing has been introduced in the UK as part of the National Cervical Screening Programme. This booklet describes what HPV is, how it is transmitted, how the test is carried out and what happens if the result is positive.

Cover image of 'HPV vaccine'

HPV vaccine (March 2017)

Jo's Cervical Cancer Trust

This booklet describes HPV (human papillomavirus) and how the vaccine works. It explains where girls can get the vaccine, how effective it is and the possible side effects.

Cover image of 'HPV vaccine. Help protect yourself against cervical cancer [Easy read]'

HPV vaccine. Help protect yourself against cervical cancer [Easy read] (2017)

NHS Health Scotland

A guide to the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine. It describes what cervical cancer is, HPV and how it is spread, and how and when the vaccine is given. It also covers consent, and possible side effects.

Cover image of 'Your smear test after treatment [Urdu]'

Your smear test after treatment [Urdu] (2017)

NHS Health Scotland

This leaflet describes cervical screening tests after treatment for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). It explains what CIN is, what happens after treatment, and why women are now tested for HPV six months after treatment for CIN.

Cover image of 'Your smear test - after CIN treatment [Easy read]'

Your smear test - after CIN treatment [Easy read] (2017)

NHS Health Scotland

This leaflet describes cervical screening tests after treatment for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). It explains what CIN is, what happens after treatment, and why women are now tested for HPV six months after treatment for CIN.

Cover image of 'The HPV vaccine for men who have sex with men [Easy read]'

The HPV vaccine for men who have sex with men [Easy read] (2017)

NHS Health Scotland

This leaflet is about the HPV vaccine for men who have sex with men to help protect against four types of HPV that can cause cancer and genital warts.

Cover image of 'Your smear test after treatment [Polish]'

Your smear test after treatment [Polish] (2017)

NHS Health Scotland

This leaflet describes cervical screening tests after treatment for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). It explains what CIN is, what happens after treatment, and why women are now tested for HPV six months after treatment for CIN.

Cover image of 'Your smear test after treatment [Chinese, Traditional]'

Your smear test after treatment [Chinese, Traditional] (2017)

NHS Health Scotland

This leaflet describes cervical screening tests after treatment for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). It explains what CIN is, what happens after treatment, and why women are now tested for HPV six months after treatment for CIN.

Cover image of 'The facts about HPV'

The facts about HPV (2017)

Jo's Cervical Cancer Trust

A short film about HPV to dispel some of the myths surrounding the virus. It is hoped that it will help more people understand what the virus is, who can get it, how it can affect them, and what they can do to best protect themselves from cervical cancer. 

Cover image of 'You just hear that word cancer and you just can’t take it'

You just hear that word cancer and you just can’t take it (2017)

Austin Macauley

Written as a diary, Lisa Primrose goes through the lows and highs of her experiences after being diagnosed with cancer. She takes the reader on an emotional rollercoaster: always positive but not afraid to give the reader a ‘warts and all' description of events. Her interactions with the Health Service are invariably good but she only gets the best out of the system by having a positive attitude to her condition no matter how physically disabling the symptoms are. (Publishers)

Cover image of 'Inside the wave'

Inside the wave (2017)

Bloodaxe Books

To be alive is to be inside the wave, always travelling until it breaks and is gone. These poems are concerned with the borderline between the living and the dead - the underworld and the human living world - and the exquisitely intense being of both. They possess a spare, eloquent lyricism as they explore the bliss and anguish of the voyage. Inside the Wave, Helen Dunmore's tenth and final book of poetry. Her final poem, 'Hold out your arms', written shortly before her death and not included in the first printing of Inside the Wave, has now been added to the reprint. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Your guide to cervical screening (smear test)'

Your guide to cervical screening (smear test) (June 2015)

Jo's Cervical Cancer Trust

Every day eight women are diagnosed with cervical cancer and three die from the disease. Yet cervical cancer is largely preventable thanks to the NHS cervical screening programme and HPV vaccination programme. In the UK 22% of UK women do not attend their cervical screening (smear test) invitation. This short film aims to give you more information about smear tests: what the test is for and what will happen during the test. It also has information on Human Papillomavirus (HPV), a virus which is the main cause of cervical cancer and cervical abnormalities. The DVD (£5.00) includes versions in Arabic, Bengali Standard, Bengali Sylheti, Chinese, Hindi, Polish, Tamil, and Urdu. You can also watch all versions online.

Cover image of 'Bald is better with earrings. A survivor’s guide to getting through breast cancer'

Bald is better with earrings. A survivor’s guide to getting through breast cancer (2015)

HarperCollins

When Andrea Hutton was diagnosed with breast cancer, she wanted to know everything. She voraciously read books, articles, and websites and talked to everyone she knew. But nothing prepared her for what the surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation would feel like. Were there tricks that could ease her pain and discomfort? What was “fatigue” and how would it affect her? At what exact moment would her hair fall out and how? Hutton wanted what she could not find: a clear how-to guide for the cancer girl she had become. Bald Is Better with Earrings is Hutton’s answer for women diagnosed with breast cancer: a straightforward handbook, leavened with humor and inspiration, to shepherd them though the experience. Warm and down-to-earth, Hutton explains what to expect and walks you through this intense and emotional process: tests, surgery, chemo, losing your hair and shaving your head, being bald, radiation treatments. Hutton offers a wealth of invaluable advice—from tricks for surviving chemo, to treating your skin during radiation, to keeping track of meds—and includes a practical list of tips for each stage of the process at the end of every chapter. Compassionate, friendly, and shaped by Hutton’s first-hand knowledge, Bald Is Better with Earrings is the comprehensive, essential companion for anyone dealing with breast cancer. (Publisher) 

Cover image of 'The human brain'

The human brain (May 2014)

The Brain Tumour Charity

This factsheet gives an overview of the brain and some of the key structures within it.

Cover image of 'Dancing with cancer (and how I learnt a few new steps)'

Dancing with cancer (and how I learnt a few new steps) (2014)

O-Books

The late Diana Brueton had never been ill and on being diagnosed with metastatic bowel cancer in August 2007 she stepped into a parallel world of waiting rooms, treatments, friends and family who supported - or fled - as life became both exquisitely precious and terrible. Dancing with Cancer is a human drama, a ride on the rollercoaster of hope and despair and, as the gradients became gentler, a journey through meditation and creativity to wisdom and acceptance. Diana was a gifted writer and artist who worked for the BBC, The Bristol Cancer Help Centre and as a teacher and art therapist. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Your guide to the HPV vaccination from September 2012'

Your guide to the HPV vaccination from September 2012 (February 2012)

Department of Health

Guidance for teenage girls about the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination. The leaflet briefly describes cervical cancer, HPV and how it spreads, how the vaccination is given and some of the possible side-effects. It also answers some frequently asked questions.

Cover image of 'Pink ribbon blues. How breast cancer culture undermines women's health'

Pink ribbon blues. How breast cancer culture undermines women's health (2011)

Oxford University Press

Pink ribbon paraphernalia saturate shopping malls, billboards, magazines, television, and other venues, all in the name of breast cancer awareness. In this compelling and provocative work, Gayle Sulik shows that though this 'pink ribbon culture' has brought breast cancer advocacy much attention, it has not had the desired effect of improving women's health. It may, in fact, have done the opposite. Based on eight years of research, analysis of advertisements and breast cancer awareness campaigns, and hundreds of interviews with those affected by the disease, Pink Ribbon Blues highlights the hidden costs of the pink ribbon as an industry, one in which breast cancer has become merely a brand name with a pink logo. Indeed, while survivors and supporters walk, run, and purchase ribbons for a cure, cancer rates rise, the cancer industry thrives, corporations claim responsible citizenship while profiting from the disease, and breast cancer is stigmatized anew for those who reject the pink ribbon model. But Sulik also outlines alternative organizations that make a real difference, highlights what they do differently, and presents a new agenda for the future. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'A woman's disease. The history of cervical cancer'

A woman's disease. The history of cervical cancer (2011)

Oxford University Press

Cervical cancer is an emotive disease with multiple connotations. It has stood for the horror of cancer, the curse of femininity, the hope of cutting-edge medical technologies and the promise of screening for malignant tumours. For a long time, this disease was identified with the most dreaded aspects of malignancies: prolonged invalidity and chronic pain, but also physical degradation, shame and social isolation. Cervical cancer displayed in parallel the dangers of being a woman. In the 20th century, innovations initially developed to control cervical cancer - radiotherapy and radium therapy, exfoliate cytology (Pap smear), homogenisation of the 'staging' of tumours, mass campaigns for an early detection of precancerous lesions of the cervix - set standards for diagnosis, treatment and prevention of other malignancies. In the late 20th century, cervical cancer underwent another important change. With the display of the role of selected strands of HPV (Human Papilloma Virus) in the genesis of this malignancy, it was transformed into a sexually transmitted disease. This new understanding of cervical cancer linked it more firmly with lifestyle choices, and thus increased the danger of stigmatisation of patients; on the other hand it opened the possibility for efficient prevention of this malignancy through vaccination. Ilana Lowy follows the disease from antiquity to the 21st century, focussing on the period since the mid-19th century, during which cervical cancer was dissociated from other gynaecological disorders and became a distinct entity. Following the ways in which new developments in science, medicine, and society have affected beliefs about medical progress and an individual's responsibility, gender roles, reproduction, and sex, Lowy demonstrates our understanding of what cervical cancer is, and how it can be prevented and cured. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Enjoy every sandwich. Living each day as if it were your last'

Enjoy every sandwich. Living each day as if it were your last (2011)

Bantam Press (imprint of Transworld Publications)

As medical director of the famed Preventive Medicine Research Institute, Lee Lipsenthal helped thousands of patients struggling with disease to overcome their fears of pain and death and to embrace a more joyful way of living. In his own life, happily married and the proud father of two remarkable children, Lee was similarly committed to living his life fully and gratefully each day. The power of those beliefs were tested in July 2009, when he was diagnosed with esophageal cancer, leaving him with a 90 percent chance of dying within five years. As Lee and his wife, Kathy, navigated his diagnosis, illness, and treatment, he discovered that he did not fear death, and that even as he was facing his own mortality, he felt more fully alive than ever before. In the tradition of Don't Sweat the Small Stuff, Tuesdays with Morrie and The Last Lecture, Enjoy Every Sandwich distils everything Lee learned about how we find meaning, purpose, and peace in our lives. Told with humour and heart, this deeply inspiring book will help readers embrace their humanity, accept uncertainty, and live a life of gratitude - whether they are facing the end now or not. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'My cancer journey. A rendezvous with myself'

My cancer journey. A rendezvous with myself (2015)

Balboa Press

My book is a candid narration of my encounter with breast cancer. It is the story of an ordinary woman who was put in extraordinary circumstances, and who undertook her cancer journey with the utmost courage. This memoir is not just about describing a difficult medical condition. It is about going through the experience, and emerging from it wiser and stronger. It is about using cancer as a life changing experience, despite all the trauma and the loss – and the change needn’t be for the worse. It is about understanding the choice that a human being has – the choice to accept what cannot be changed, and to use one of the toughest fights of life to evolve into a better person, irrespective of the prognosis. Pick up a copy to embark on a rendezvous with your inner self! (Author)

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