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The web Directory of Information Materials for People Affected by Cancer is regularly updated and currently has details of over 1,900 booklets, leaflets, books and audiovisual materials for people affected by cancer. Most have been published in the last five years but we have included some older ones that are still useful.

Results: 111

Cover image of 'Hair loss'

Hair loss (September 2019)

Lymphoma Action

Some lymphoma treatments can cause your hair to thin or fall out. Knowing what to expect and what you can do about it may help you cope with losing your hair. This factsheet has advice on how to care for your hair and scalp during and after treatment. It also tells you about some of the options you may wish to consider until your hair grows back. 

Cover image of 'Feel more like you. Expert advice on caring for your skin, nails and hair during cancer treatment'

Feel more like you. Expert advice on caring for your skin, nails and hair during cancer treatment (September 2019)

Macmillan Cancer Support

This booklet explains how certain cancer treatments can cause changes to your appearance. It is for people who have had changes to their skin, nails and hair because of cancer treatment. It gives advice on how to manage these changes to help you feel more like you again. We hope it helps you deal with some of the questions or feelings you may have. 

Cover image of 'Anna loses her hair. A children’s guide to hair loss as a result of cancer treatment'

Anna loses her hair. A children’s guide to hair loss as a result of cancer treatment (October 2018)

Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group

Hair loss is a common side effect of having chemotherapy and of radiotherapy to the head. This book tells the story of Anna, Jack and Laura who all lose their hair while having treatment for cancer and helps young children to understand what might happen.

Cover image of 'Breast cancer and hair loss'

Breast cancer and hair loss (January 2018)

Breast Cancer Care

Many people will lose either some or all of their hair as a result of treatment for breast cancer. For some, this is the most distressing side effect of treatment. Some people find that being prepared for hair loss before it occurs helps them cope better when it happens. This booklet explains how you may lose your hair and the effect it can have. It looks at how to care for your hair and scalp during and after treatment and the different headwear you may want to try, including wigs and headscarves. It includes step-by-step guides to tying headscarves and tips on recreating the illusion of eyebrows and eyelashes. The final part of the booklet discusses what usually happens when your hair grows back and how to look after it.

Cover image of 'Menopausal symptoms and breast cancer'

Menopausal symptoms and breast cancer (March 2018)

Breast Cancer Care

A booklet for women who are experiencing menopausal symptoms after breast cancer treatment. It has advice on treatments (prescription drugs and complementary therapies) and practical measures for coping with hot flushes, vaginal dryness, loss of libido, mood swings, joint pain and risk of osteoporosis. Includes details of further support.

Cover image of 'Recovery after treatment'

Recovery after treatment (May 2018)

Lymphoma Action

It can be difficult to know what to expect when you finish treatment for lymphoma. This factsheet is about your recovery from the side effects that may have affected your body during treatment. Contents: The recovery package; How soon will I feel better?; Symptoms to look out for; Late effects of treatment.

Cover image of 'Coping with hair loss'

Coping with hair loss (August 2017)

Macmillan Cancer Support

This booklet is about hair loss. It is for anyone coping with changes to their hair during and after cancer treatment. It explains how cancer treatment may affect your hair, how to prepare for and cope with hair loss, and what to expect after treatment finishes.

Cover image of 'Side effects of cancer treatment'

Side effects of cancer treatment (January 2017)

Macmillan Cancer Support

This factsheet is about some of the side effects of cancer treatment.

Cover image of 'Chemotherapy. Your questions answered'

Chemotherapy. Your questions answered (November 2017)

The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust

This booklet describes what chemotherapy is, how it works, how treatment is planned and carried out, and possible side-effects; for example, anaemia, infection, appetite changes, nausea, skin changes, hair loss, and fertility problems. It also briefly discusses issues such as emotional well-being and fatigue. Includes further sources of information and support.

Cover image of 'Side effects of cancer treatment'

Side effects of cancer treatment (March 2017)

Macmillan Cancer Support

An overview of some of the more common side-effects that might happen with cancer treatments: bone marrow and blood, fatigue, mouth problems, nausea and vomiting, diarrhoea and constipation, eating problems, skin, fertility, sex life, hormonal changes. The booklet suggests ways of dealing with them.

Cover image of 'Having a bad hair day'

Having a bad hair day (2017)

Clare C Davison

“Tomorrow, you will feel a little bit better.” From a loving childhood, belonging to a large family with no history of breast cancer, Clare was alarmed at age 42 to accidentally discover she had the disease. As a self-employed single mum, Clare documents her memoirs of personal experience and knowledge of the cruel decisions made for the aggressive treatments and hair loss ahead. With an inner strength of humour, Clare’s first book includes her lunch arrangements with Peter Andre, a cake nationally released in her honour, an experience of public speaking, media attention and continued fundraising with a moving excerpt from her son. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Pampering therapy'

Pampering therapy (March 2017)

Look Good...Feel Better

Cover image of 'Chemo summer. An uplifting breast cancer experience'

Chemo summer. An uplifting breast cancer experience (2017)

Austin Macauley

In Chemo Summer Jane Hoggar takes the reader through a light-hearted and informative account of her discovery of breast cancer and its cure. Cancer of any description has the capacity to chill those it affects and their loved ones. But for Jane Hoggar early discovery and diagnosis provided for a satisfactory resolution. And it's these small details that might well help people in a similar situation. For example, Jane did not discover a lump, which is the usual thing in breast cancer, but a sag' when she raised her arms and it was her insistence that something was wrong that resulted in a vital early medical diagnosis. All the side issues are covered in the book, effects of chemo and radiotherapy, hair loss and wigs, changes in diet and exercise, making Chemo Summer a valuable and engaging look into a serious and often frightening subject. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'All to live for. Fighting cancer. Finding hope.'

All to live for. Fighting cancer. Finding hope. (2017)

Headline

In 2005 Emma Hannigan was 32, happily married to her long-time love, with two young children. Her world was shattered when she discovered that she had the rare gene BRCA1, meaning a 50% chance of developing ovarian cancer and an 85% chance of breast cancer. To reduce the risk, Emma had a double mastectomy and both ovaries removed, but in 2007 received the news that cancer had struck anyway. Twelve years later, Emma is battling cancer for the tenth time. With warmth and wisdom, she shares her journey and her advice on everything from skincare and hair loss to how to keep a sense of humour through it all. All to Live For is a story of one woman's determination not to let cancer win; a story of strength and inspiration, hope and love. And of never giving up. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Pretty sick. The beauty guide for woman with cancer. How to look your best when you feel your worst'

Pretty sick. The beauty guide for woman with cancer. How to look your best when you feel your worst (2017)

Piatkus Books

The ultimate resource to looking your best during and after cancer treatment, from a veteran beauty industry insider. Like many women who receive the shattering diagnosis of cancer, Caitlin Kiernan was concerned about her health and her future, but also about how the treatment would affect how she felt and looked - would she lose her hair? Would she lose her nails? How would she look after a double mastectomy? But unlike other women who battle cancer, Kiernan has spent her entire career as a beauty editor, beauty director (most recently for Life & Style Weekly), and now beauty producer. As someone who works in the public eye and in the fashion industry, Kiernan had to quickly learn how to look her best even when she was feeling her worst. So she called on her list of extensive contacts and beauty insiders - from hair professionals to top medical doctors (at institutions like Memorial Sloan Kettering and Mt Sinai Hospital) to style mavens and even celebrities (including Wendy Williams and Hoda Kotb) - to gather the best and most useful beauty tips for cancer treatment. The result is Pretty Sick: the ultimate guide to beauty during (and after) cancer treatment, covering skin care, hair care (and wig shopping), nail care, makeup, an explanation of breast cancer surgical options, style advice for life post mastectomy, and much, much more. Illustrated with charming line drawings and peppered with advice from celebrities and cancer survivors, Pretty Sick will be a welcome and trusted resource during treatment, helping women to look their best even when they don't feel their best. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Autologous stem cell transplant'

Autologous stem cell transplant (November 2016)

Lymphoma Action

This booklet describes autologous stem cell transplant in detail. 

Cover image of 'Living for a reason - a true cancer journey'

Living for a reason - a true cancer journey (2016)

Austin Macauley

There can be up to 50,000 cases of breast cancer a year in the UK. Ann, in J.A. Prescott's Living for a Reason, is just one. On receiving the news of her condition Ann greets it with the response - You haven't told me that I'm dying yet?' and that is the spirit she carries throughout the book. It is a moving and powerful portrait of a woman who, faced with the vicissitudes of cancer, determines to live life to the full. The book shows Ann as she goes through the stages of cancer and the phases of treatment; the well known mastectomy, the loss of hair, the cosmetic surgery, the chemotherapy and the less well-known side-effects of the drugs. With her condition compounded with the onset of arthritis Ann's determination is inspirational and her story is one of great courage. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Recognise yourself. Beauty despite cancer. A practical guide to maintaining your appearance and well-being as you go through surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, or experience hair loss'

Recognise yourself. Beauty despite cancer. A practical guide to maintaining your appearance and well-being as you go through surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, or experience hair loss (2015)

Lotus Publishing

Jennifer Young shares her knowledge and experience by showing those living with cancer and beyond how to prevent, reduce, disguise, camouflage and soothe their appearance-related side effects. Covering subjects such as wig fitting, styling, how to dress your new body, hair regrowth after treatment, and eyebrows and eyelashes, this guide to beauty, hair, style and well-being for cancer patients is the most comprehensive ever published. Jennifer is the founder of www.BeautyDespiteCancer.co.uk and creator of specialist skincare and cosmetics Defiant Beauty. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Nowhere hair'

Nowhere hair (2015)

Thousand Words Press

The little girl in Nowhere Hair knows two things: Her mom's hair is not on her head anymore, so therefore it must be somewhere around the house. After searching the obvious places, the story reveals that her mother, although going through cancer treatment, is still silly, attentive, happy and yes, sometimes very tired and cranky. She learns that she didn't cause the cancer, can't catch it, and that Mommy still is very much up for the job of mothering. The book, written in rhyme, explains hats, scarves, wigs, going bald in public, and the idea of being nice to people who may look a little different than you. It ends with the idea that what is inside of us is far more important than how we look on the outside. For any parent or grandparent, Nowhere Hair offers a comfortable platform to explain something that is inherently very difficult. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Look good...feel better confidence kit. A guide to managing the appearance-related effects of cancer treatment'

Look good...feel better confidence kit. A guide to managing the appearance-related effects of cancer treatment (2015)

Look Good...Feel Better

This booklet and accompanying DVD has information and advice about make-up, skincare, hand and nail care, wig selection and cutting, scarf tying and head coverings to help manage changes in personal appearance caused by treatment for cancer.

Cover image of 'Tea & chemo. Fighting cancer, living life'

Tea & chemo. Fighting cancer, living life (2015)

Urbane Publications Limited

At the age of 45, wife and mother Jackie Buxton was diagnosed with breast cancer. Lurching between the crippling fear that the cancer had spread, and the great comfort of knowing she was one of the lucky ones who could be treated, she did what she always does when life presents her with a challenge: she wrote it down. Jackie quickly realised that even with cancer, life was far from bad. Never known for her scientific prowess, she nonetheless became a 'bit of an expert' - at least in the field of hair loss, water retention and biscuits - and decided to use her writing to share experiences and help others recognise you don't have to be defined by your cancer. Tea & Chemo is full of laughter, tears, honesty and hope, and offers inspirational words to everyone facing the life challenges that cancer inevitably brings. All proceeds from the sales of Tea & Chemo will go to three incredibly important charities, whose compassionate care and professionalism make the difference to so many lives: The Haven, Breast Cancer Now and The Robert Ogden Macmillan Centre, Harrogate. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Chemotherapy for lung cancer. Understanding chemotherapy'

Chemotherapy for lung cancer. Understanding chemotherapy (July 2014)

Roy Castle Lung Cancer Foundation

This factsheet describes chemotherapy for small-cell and non-small-cell lung cancer and covers the following topics: anxiety (fear of needles); what happens during treatment; practical advice for dealing with side-effects (tiredness, sickness and nausea, mouth ulcers, hair loss, infection, diarrhoea, constipation, bruising or bleeding); diet during chemotherapy; and how doctors know if chemotherapy is working.

Cover image of 'A guide to looking your best'

A guide to looking your best (September 2012)

Cancer Focus Northern Ireland

This guide offers simple and practical tips to help you look after your body, skin, nails and hair during and after treatment for cancer. Feeling good about yourself helps to give you more energy to face your illness and to cope better when you’re feeling down. Contains advice for men and women.

Cover image of 'Milkshakes and morphine. A memoir of love and loss'

Milkshakes and morphine. A memoir of love and loss ()

Square Peg (imprint of Vintage)

This is a singular memoir: an excavation of mother love, a candid account of the agonies, and absurdities, of the cancer experience, and a doggedly optimistic paean to life. When Genevieve Fox finds a lump in her throat, she turns up for the hospital diagnosis in a party frock and fancy hair. I can’t have cancer, she thinks. I’ve done my hair. But there is another reason she can’t countenance cancer. Genevieve was orphaned to it at the age of nine. Genevieve’s story weaves together past and present as she recalls her rackety, unconventional childhood, while also facing the spectre of being lost to her young boys. Yet, she confronts her treatment with the same sassy survival instinct that characterised her childhood misadventures. Through an extraordinary alchemy, Genevieve takes life’s precariousness and turns it on its head. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Eating – help yourself. A guide for patients and their carers'

Eating – help yourself. A guide for patients and their carers (February 2019)

Christie Hospital NHS Trust

Eating may be a problem for people with cancer or other illnesses, particularly when undergoing treatment such as radiotherapy or chemotherapy. This booklet has advice on how to eat well when trying to cope with loss of appetite, changes in taste, dry mouth, difficulties swallowing, feeling full, nausea, diarrhoea, and constipation. It has tips on how to make food as nourishing as possible and ideas for snacks and drinks.

Cover image of 'Nourishing your body during pancreatic cancer treatment'

Nourishing your body during pancreatic cancer treatment (2016)

Pancreatic Cancer Action

Created by dietitians and chefs at University College Cork, this recipe book provides advice on how best to combat cancer-induced weight loss and other eating related problems whilst undergoing pancreatic cancer treatment.  It features over 80 quick, easy and energy dense recipes for nourishing meals and snacks that have been created specifically for people who find it hard to maintain a healthy weight. 

Cover image of 'There's something I've been dying to tell you'

There's something I've been dying to tell you (2014)

Coronet (Hodder & Stoughton)

In 2013 Lynda Bellingham was diagnosed with cancer. Having kept the details of her illness private, now for the very first time Lynda talks with beautiful poignancy about her life since her diagnosis, her family and how together they came to terms with a future they hadn't planned. Having been told that she only has a matter of months left to live and writing this in what will be her final days, There's something I’ve been dying to tell you is a brave and brutally honest memoir and yet Lynda also manages to spread her infectious warmth and humour, bringing light to a very dark time. Woven into this very moving and brave story are extraordinary, colourful tales of her acting and family life that will enlighten and entertain as well as the journey that Lynda has taken to find the family of her birth father having already suffered heartache in her search for her birth mother. In the search for her father's family, Lynda finds a family with a history in entertainment showing that acting was always in the blood. Lynda Bellingham was a tremendously gifted storyteller with a rich collection of tales of love, loss and laughter and this book brings her kind heart, courage and emotion to the page in vivid detail. Lynda's story is an affecting and at times heart-breaking one but it is so often laugh-out-loud too and ultimately the way Lynda tells her life story will serve as a great inspiration. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Laryngectomy is not a tragedy. An introduction to pharyngeal speech'

Laryngectomy is not a tragedy. An introduction to pharyngeal speech (2013)

Cancer Laryngectomee Trust

This updated edition contains the original chapters written by Sydney Norgate in 1989 plus additional material by Dr Nicola Oswald on current speech methods and future developments. It will provide help and encouragement to all laryngectomy patients and their families. It is full of practical advice and information, as well as reassurance. The author, who had himself had his larynx removed, wrote from personal experience of the problems caused by the loss of normal speech, and describes the method of learning to use substitute pharyngeal speech. Written in a straightforward, humorous style and illustrated with cartoons 'Laryngectomy is not a Tragedy' has proved to be a valuable source of advice and inspiration to all those who face this operation. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Diet and nutrition for pancreatic cancer'

Diet and nutrition for pancreatic cancer (June 2015)

Pancreatic Cancer Action

This booklet for patients and carers contains information about how pancreatic cancer can affect diet and nutrition. It covers managing dietary symptoms such as poor appetite, weight loss and diarrhoea, dietary supplements and diabetes and diet. Contains dietary advice for patients undergoing surgery and for patients undergoing treatments such as chemotherapy.

Cover image of 'Symptoms of lymphoma'

Symptoms of lymphoma (November 2018)

Lymphoma Action

This information gives details about the symptoms of lymphoma and the possible reasons for them: B symptoms; swollen lymph nodes; fatigue; unexplained weight loss; night sweats; itching; fever; difficulty getting over infections; chest symptoms; abdominal (tummy) symptoms; pain; skin symptoms; brain and nerve symptoms; swelling in the arms or legs; anaemia (low red blood cells). 

Cover image of 'Managing lung cancer symptoms'

Managing lung cancer symptoms (March 2015)

Roy Castle Lung Cancer Foundation

This booklet describes the possible symptoms that may experienced when living with lung cancer and how to cope with them.

Cover image of 'Coping with common symptoms of lymphoma'

Coping with common symptoms of lymphoma (November 2018)

Lymphoma Action

This factsheet has general guidance for coping with some of the symptoms of lymphoma, including: swollen lymph nodes; fatigue;  weight loss; night sweats; itching; pain; skin symptoms; swollen arms or legs; and coping with your emotions.

Cover image of 'Grief and loss when someone dies'

Grief and loss when someone dies (2016)

CHANGE

An easy read booklet explaining what dying is, how you might feel if someone you love dies and where you can get support.  

Cover image of 'Young person's guide to lymphoma'

Young person's guide to lymphoma (January 2017)

Lymphoma Association

Comprehensive booklet for young people with lymphoma. 

Cover image of 'Your body, intimacy and sex'

Your body, intimacy and sex (May 2016)

Breast Cancer Care

This booklet is for any woman who has breast cancer and would like more information on how it may affect her sexuality and sexual well-being. It covers sex and sexuality, breast cancer and sexuality, and intimate relationships. Includes photographs, quotes, and sources of information and support.

Cover image of 'Recipes for people affected by cancer'

Recipes for people affected by cancer (December 2017)

Macmillan Cancer Support

Guidance on eating a healthy diet and coping with poor appetite and weight loss, with plenty of recipes for people living with cancer or those caring for them.

Cover image of 'Eating well when you have cancer'

Eating well when you have cancer (February 2019)

The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust

Cancer and its treatment can affect appetite and enjoyment of food. This booklet has been written to help people eat well when they have a poor appetite or are losing weight. It suggests foods to eat to maintain a healthy diet, foods to avoid, nourishing and supplementary drinks, and high-energy foods. It also has advice for times when eating is difficult, as a result, for example, of fatigue, nausea, sore mouth, diarrhoea, or constipation. Includes recipes and sources of further information and support.

Cover image of 'Eating problems and cancer'

Eating problems and cancer (August 2017)

Macmillan Cancer Support

During and after cancer treatment, many people can experience eating problems. This may be as a result of treatment or the cancer itself. This booklet highlights some common eating problems and why they may happen and suggest some practical ways to manage them.

Cover image of 'Bereavement and grief'

Bereavement and grief (September 2019)

Lymphoma Action

The death of someone you love can be extremely difficult to deal with and the mix of feelings that accompany such loss can feel overwhelming. Even if the person was unwell for a while, it can still be a shock. We all have our own ways of grieving. While nobody can take away the pain, there is support available to help you cope. Contents: What is grief?; Feelings you might experience when someone you love dies; Interactions with other people; Frequently asked questions about bereavement, loss and grief; How can I help myself?.

Cover image of 'Managing weight gain after cancer treatment'

Managing weight gain after cancer treatment (February 2019)

Macmillan Cancer Support

This booklet is for people living with or after cancer who want to maintain a healthy weight. It explains how making changes to diet and levels of physical activity can help people lose weight and feel better. It does not include information about eating problems caused by cancer and its treatments, or advice if you have lost weight.

Cover image of 'Diet and breast cancer'

Diet and breast cancer (September 2017)

Breast Cancer Care

A booklet for people having treatment for, or recovering from, breast cancer. It explains what is meant by a healthy diet and what to do if the effects of treatment cause problems such as changes in appetite or taste, nausea, sore mouth, constipation or diarrhoea. It also covers weight gain, weight loss, bone health, dietary supplements, phyto-oestrogens, alcohol, and complementary and alternative diets such as the Bristol diet, dairy-free diets and macrobiotics. Also available as an e-book (Kindle, Kobe or Sony Reader)

Cover image of 'Healthy eating guidelines. A guide to supporting health with good nutrition for people affected by cancer.'

Healthy eating guidelines. A guide to supporting health with good nutrition for people affected by cancer. (January 2017)

Penny Brohn UK

This booklet has been written for people affected by cancer or those wishing to reduce their risk of cancer. It contains general guidance and is not meant to be prescriptive. Everyone has unique nutritional requirements that depend, amongst other things, on genetic make up, medical history, stage of treatment, current state of health, and lifestyle, as well as tastes and preferences. The guidelines can be adapted to suit your own tastes and needs. If you have special dietary needs or problems with eating, swallowing, digestion, or weight loss you should seek further advice from a nutritionally-qualified health professional who has experience of working with people affected by cancer. 

Cover image of 'The building-up diet'

The building-up diet (August 2017)

Macmillan Cancer Support

Many people find it difficult to eat enough to maintain their weight during and after treatment for cancer. This booklet has suggestions on how to help boost energy and protein levels when appetite is poor. It explains healthy eating and includes sample menus and a suggested shopping list of items to stock up on.

Cover image of 'The living well with cancer cookbook. An essential guide to nutrition, lifestyle and health'

The living well with cancer cookbook. An essential guide to nutrition, lifestyle and health (2016)

Bantam Press (imprint of Transworld Publications)

When authors Fran Warde and Catherine Zabilowicz met at the Maggie’s centre at Charing Cross Hospital in London, they quickly discovered they shared a passion for good food and healthy eating. They also realized that with their combined knowledge and experience – Fran as an acclaimed food writer, and Catherine as an experienced nutritional therapist working at Maggie’s – they could provide invaluable guidance for anyone living with cancer, their families and friends. The Living Well With Cancer Cookbook, published in support of the Maggie’s charity, is the result of Fran and Catherine’s collaboration. Aimed at helping readers through each stage of their journey – diagnosis, during and after treatment – this essential guide is packed with advice on nutrition and health and offers a range of delicious recipes. There are healthy twists on classic favourites and tempting new treats to try, with every ingredient considered for its health benefits. Positive and empowering, the book contains a wealth of information on the best food choices to make, and reveals why many scientists today believe that certain foods and a balanced diet are crucial in sustaining strength throughout treatment. Taking a holistic approach, this book also seeks to alleviate anxieties, such as those concerning weight-loss, loss of appetite and the changes in how food tastes. Above all, the simple, comforting recipes will help both experienced cooks and novices to create nutritious, easily adapted meals – from breakfast right through to dinner – each one designed to nourish and sustain. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Signs and symptoms of cancer and how to reduce your risk'

Signs and symptoms of cancer and how to reduce your risk (March 2017)

Macmillan Cancer Support

This leaflet explains how to recognise the early signs of cancer and how to reduce the risk. It describes the symptoms to look out for (unexplained bleeding, weight loss, lumps, pain) and how to reduce the risk by making lifestyle changes (smoking, diet, exercise, alcohol drinking and taking care in the sun).

Cover image of 'Preparing a child for loss'

Preparing a child for loss (April 2018)

Macmillan Cancer Support|Winston's Wish

This booklet is written with the childhood bereavement charity, Winston’s Wish. It’s for parents or guardians who are near the end of life and aims to help you prepare and talk to a child or children about your death. Partners, grandparents and close family members may find it useful, too. It may also help you talk to children who are already dealing with the death of a family member. 

Cover image of 'The hare who lost her hair'

The hare who lost her hair (2013)

Self-published using CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

This one-of-a-kind story is a message of hope for young children and families who are undergoing chemotherapy or any difficult struggle. Without words like cancer and chemo, the kid-friendly tale follows a brave hare on her courageous journey to overcome illness. A mysterious, healing stream offers the potential to get well, but there are surprising side effects that will challenge the hare's strength and determination. This book is about believing wishes can come true even in the most extreme circumstances. Ideal for early stage cancers due to the message of survival. Perfect for pairing with honest discussions about your personal situation. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'A young person's guide to dealing with the loss of a brother or sister'

A young person's guide to dealing with the loss of a brother or sister (November 2019)

CLIC Sargent

The death of a brother or sister is likely to be one of the most difficult things that’s ever happened to you. It may even feel like nobody understands what you’re going through, but the fact is help is always at hand. CLIC Sargent has worked closely with young people who have lost a sibling to put together this booklet. As well as showing how this is something others have experienced, we’ve provided contacts to help you find further support and information. Even if you just want someone to talk to, you’ll find all the information you need right here.

Cover image of 'Travels with Cookie. Narrowboat cruising with a cat'

Travels with Cookie. Narrowboat cruising with a cat (2014)

Self-published using CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

Between 2004 and 2006, David Thomas experienced a series of disasters in his life, culminating in being told that he only had a short time left to live. Rather than sinking into despair as many people would, he decided to fulfil his lifelong dream of living on a canal boat, while he still could. So he bought a narrowboat, LadyRiverMouse (an anagram of 'Live Your Dreams') with a view to spending the rest of his limited life cruising the canals and rivers of England. Naturally, he had to take the love of his life with him – a rather bad-tempered fluffy white prima donna of a cat called Cookie. Cookie was an indoor cat who had rarely been outside, never mind living on a boat, where according to David dogs are usually the pets of choice. Would it work out? David didn't know, but as he put it, “I wasn't going anywhere without my beloved Cookie”. The remainder of the book is an account of the few years David spent travelling through the waterways of his native land. Many people live on boats; few cruise as extensively as David did – to London, along the Thames, up to Wales, then tackling the wild and often desolate rivers of North West England. A beginner to boating when he started, David learned much as time went on, mainly by having numerous – and often hair-raising - adventures. So did Cookie, who contrived to get lost, fall in the water on a number of occasions, and generally use up most of her cat's nine lives. Finally David met Helen, a helicopter instructor, writer, and – most importantly – cat lover. They fell in love, and David's life began to change yet again, leading to the eventual sale of LadyRiverMouse and a new life in the Peak District for David and Cookie. David knows about boating, has an eye for detail, and is also an astute observer of his fellow men and women, both on and off the waterways. Therefore this book will clearly be of interest to those who have ever travelled on the canals or done any other boating, anyone who loves travel of any type, or simply the armchair traveller who enjoys reading about others' adventures. But “Travels With Cookie” is more than just another boating or travel book. It is a tale of bereavement and divorce, of terminal illness and despair, and finally of romance, a seemingly miraculous cure, and a new life. Hence it should appeal to anyone who likes human interest stories of any type. And of course – as Cookie herself would tell you if she could speak - it i

Cover image of 'Hair everywhere'

Hair everywhere (2017)

Istros Books

Hair Everywhere is the story of one family and how they manage to cope when the mother is diagnosed with cancer. It is a delicate tale that balances itself between the generations, revealing their strengths and weaknesses in times of trouble. It is also a story about how roles within a family can change when things become challenging, due to sickness or death, allowing some to grow and others to fade. Ultimately, this is a book about life; full of humour and absurdity as well as sadness, and set against an everyday background where the ordinary takes on new significance and colour. Tea Tulic’s debut novel is a brave glance at the human condition. (Publisher)

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