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The web Directory of Information Materials for People Affected by Cancer is regularly updated and currently has details of over 1,900 booklets, leaflets, books and audiovisual materials for people affected by cancer. Most have been published in the last five years but we have included some older ones that are still useful.

Results: 150

Cover image of 'Coping with hair loss [Audio CD]'

Coping with hair loss [Audio CD] (2012)

Macmillan Cancer Support

Audio CD of the booklet, which describes how cancer treatments may cause hair loss, and how to look after the hair and scalp before, during and after treatment. It has plenty of information and practical tips on using wigs, hats, scarves, and turbans. Includes details of wig specialists, turban and head-wrap suppliers, specialist hair services, useful organisations and other resources such as books and websites.

Cover image of 'A guide to looking your best'

A guide to looking your best (September 2012)

Cancer Focus Northern Ireland

This guide offers simple and practical tips to help you look after your body, skin, nails and hair during and after treatment for cancer. Feeling good about yourself helps to give you more energy to face your illness and to cope better when you’re feeling down. Contains advice for men and women.

Cover image of 'Go with the flow'

Go with the flow (2012)

Quartet Books

Diagnosed with breast cancer, internationally renowned photographer Gemma Levine determined to use her skill and connections to write a book about her experience that would be a companion, a resource, an aide and, finally, a practical guide to the incredible journey all cancer patients must travel if they are to regain control of their life. Medical practitioners, researchers, support staff, therapists, even make-up experts and a cordon bleu cook have gladly contributed accounts that, added together, provide a book of bountiful insights and comfort. A unique series of pool exercises which Gemma created for herself are included as an appendix. It is, in the end, overcoming the fear of and guilt about the suddenness of the diagnosis and the myriad unknown factors in coping with the treatment of cancer where this remarkable book will prove its worth. The skill and artistry of Gemma's black and white photographs contribute an additional, dynamic quality that captures the humanity and, ultimately, the love so many people involved in the treatment and help of cancer patients bring to bear. This book is, above all, a message of practical hope. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The game of my life.'

The game of my life. (2012)

Trinity Mirror Sport Media

Gary Ablett was an ordinary boy whose football dream came true. He was talent spotted, given an apprenticeship and graduated to the first team of Liverpool Football Club. It was a golden era. The Anfield dressing room was packed with legends in the 1980s. Dalglish, Hansen, Nicol, Rush, Barnes. But no sooner had he established himself than Ablett realised that the real fight had only just begun. He struggled to make his voice heard in a club full of strong personalities. Despite winning two league titles and an FA Cup, his performances eventually started to slip. When he was effectively told he could leave Anfield, he did the unthinkable in many Merseyside fans' eyes. He crossed Stanley Park and joined Everton. There he fought another battle to win over the supporters and ended up making history. When the Blues overturned the odds to lift the FA Cup in 1995, Ablett became the only man to win the famous trophy with both Merseyside clubs. Other career challenges followed but the biggest battle lay ahead of him. When he was told he was suffering from an aggressive form of cancer he vowed that he would not give in to the illness. It was then that Ablett saw the other side of the game. The remarkable courage he showed won him new respect. The football family pulled together to look after one of their own. This is a touching and inspiring book that will shock and surprise you. A story that Gary Ablett wanted to tell with a powerful message about the choices we make in football - and life itself. Gary Ablett wrote this book in 2011 with Paul Joyce. Paul is Merseyside football correspondent for The Daily Express. Forewords by Kenny Dalglish and David Moyes. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Talk to the headscarf'

Talk to the headscarf (2011)

Piatkus (Little, Brown Book Group)

Emma Hannigan was thirty-two and married with two small children when she found out that she had an 85 per cent chance of developing cancer. Over the following year she had a double mastectomy and both ovaries removed, reducing her cancer risk to five per cent. But then her worst fears were realised. Cancer struck anyway. Talk to the Headscarf is the story of how she lived, laughed and overcame some of the toughest times in her life. Emma has now battled cancer eight times. In this inspirational account, she shares with us the highs and lows of her astounding story and shows us that, against the odds, life can and does carry on. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Understanding melanoma. Treatment with local surgery [Audio CD]'

Understanding melanoma. Treatment with local surgery [Audio CD] (2011)

Macmillan Cancer Support

Audio CD of the booklet. Information for people having local surgery for melanoma. The booklet describes the treatment and follow up, and skincare in the sun afterwards. It also covers feelings and making lifestyle changes and list sources of support.

Cover image of 'Who will do my hair?'

Who will do my hair? (2010)

Ulster Cancer Foundation

This illustrated book for young children aims to help them understand and prepare for the death of a parent or significant adult.

Cover image of 'Connecting through compassion. Guidance for family and friends of a brain cancer patient'

Connecting through compassion. Guidance for family and friends of a brain cancer patient (2010)

Cancer Lifeline Publications

This book candidly discusses the challenges of living with the personality and behavior changes brain cancer brings, and offers practical tools to make the journey easier. Joni Aldrich and Neysa Peterson have each cared for a spouse with a brain illness. They have combined their insights in this practical, straight-talking guide. Readers will learn: symptoms a brain cancer patient may experience; how to create and maintain a warm, comfortable and safe environment; methods to use if communication becomes an issue; how to deal with changes in personality, behavior, and emotions, including loss of social inhibition skills; how to handle issues related to changes in memory and the resulting confusion; how to work through indifference, sadness, and depression towards some peace; how to cope with self-destructive behavior-safety is your number one concern; how to have end-of-life discussions and fulfil final wishes. When a family member or friend is diagnosed with cancer, life as you know it has ended. Not only must you face the chaos of doctors' visits, exhausting treatments, and sleepless nights, you must try to savor every precious moment with your loved one. When the diagnosis is brain cancer, you must endure all this plus one more challenge: the person you love may look the same, and sound the same-but he or she is not the same. His or her personality may change in extreme ways. A kind and loving person may become angry and say hurtful things. A warm, upbeat person may withdraw or behave in self-destructive ways. The essence of your loved one can disappear, even as he or she continues to live. With the tools in this book, you can continue to love and be loved during this difficult crisis. 'The last weeks of Gordon's life were spent with someone that I barely knew and didn't know how to approach. It took me two years of counseling to get through the scars. It didn't have to be that way for me. And it certainly doesn't have to be that way for you.' Joni Aldrich (Publisher)

Cover image of 'I miss you. A first look at death'

I miss you. A first look at death (2009)

Wayland

This reassuring picture book explores the difficult issue of death for young children. Children's feelings and questions about this sensitive subject are looked at in a simple but realistic way. This book helps them to understand their loss and come to terms with it. Written by a trained psychotherapist, journalist and parent, and illustrated by an experienced children's book artist, this is part of an acclaimed and successful series of picture-book non-fiction for Early Years. Books in the series give advice and promote interaction between children, parents, and teachers on a wide variety of personal, social and emotional issues. They are excellent tools for teachers to use during classroom discussions. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Pretty sick. The beauty guide for woman with cancer. How to look your best when you feel your worst'

Pretty sick. The beauty guide for woman with cancer. How to look your best when you feel your worst (2007)

Piatkus Books

The ultimate resource to looking your best during and after cancer treatment, from a veteran beauty industry insider. Like many women who receive the shattering diagnosis of cancer, Caitlin Kiernan was concerned about her health and her future, but also about how the treatment would affect how she felt and looked - would she lose her hair? Would she lose her nails? How would she look after a double mastectomy? But unlike other women who battle cancer, Kiernan has spent her entire career as a beauty editor, beauty director (most recently for Life & Style Weekly), and now beauty producer. As someone who works in the public eye and in the fashion industry, Kiernan had to quickly learn how to look her best even when she was feeling her worst. So she called on her list of extensive contacts and beauty insiders - from hair professionals to top medical doctors (at institutions like Memorial Sloan Kettering and Mt Sinai Hospital) to style mavens and even celebrities (including Wendy Williams and Hoda Kotb) - to gather the best and most useful beauty tips for cancer treatment. The result is Pretty Sick: the ultimate guide to beauty during (and after) cancer treatment, covering skin care, hair care (and wig shopping), nail care, makeup, an explanation of breast cancer surgical options, style advice for life post mastectomy, and much, much more. Illustrated with charming line drawings and peppered with advice from celebrities and cancer survivors, Pretty Sick will be a welcome and trusted resource during treatment, helping women to look their best even when they don't feel their best. (Publisher)

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