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The web Directory of Information Materials for People Affected by Cancer is regularly updated and currently has details of over 1,900 booklets, leaflets, books and audiovisual materials for people affected by cancer. Most have been published in the last five years but we have included some older ones that are still useful.

Results: 111

Cover image of 'Love and remission: my life, my man, my cancer'

Love and remission: my life, my man, my cancer (2018)

Trigger

In her mid-twenties, balancing a stable job and a partying lifestyle, Annie was also on the hunt for a man. She wanted to find Mr Right, get married, buy a house, and live the life she'd always wanted. But then one day, she found a lump ... Breast cancer. The two words that would derail Annie's life. Suddenly she realised how short her life had been, and the very idea of finding love seemed impossible. As her hair fell out, and her social life crumbled, her mental health deteriorated. She began to question if she would actually survive. Struggling with an identity crisis and worryingly low moods, she wondered if she'd ever be able to live the normal life that had been within her reach only months earlier. Love and Remission tells the tale of a young woman in search of love and mental wellbeing. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'A new kind of normal'

A new kind of normal (2018)

Self-published

They say there’s a book in all of us, but I doubt I would ever have written one had it not have been for my diagnosis of breast cancer in 2011. ‘A New Kind of Normal' is the story of my life up to and moving on from that moment. Growing up in the 60's, working through the 70's and 80's, juggling a career in TV and radio while bringing up three children and surviving two divorces. From the moment I knew what a bra was, I’d wanted breasts: I even crafted a pair of blue plasticine boobs for myself, as nature made me wait until I was 15 for breasts of my own! Through cancer I lost them both, and with the chemotherapy; all my hair, my fingernails, and more worryingly, a sense of whom I was. My hair grew back, as did my fingernails, but I still struggled with my identity. What I’ve written isn't a diary, nor a self-help guide, and it's not just about cancer. I’ve taken a really good look at the little girl I was and the woman I grew into, and why I went to such lengths to try and claw back some of what cancer had taken from me - it's not everyone's way I appreciate, and it’s been an interesting exercise trying to ascertain why it was mine! I’ve been honest, open, and meticulous when it comes to detail, as I firmly believe that if you take away the mystery, you can take away some of the fear. But there’s a lot to laugh about here too, as luckily I’ve always been able to see the funny side of a situation, preferring that to the occasional overwhelming despair I felt. In this book I've tried to move the disease away from the medical professionals and the hospitals, and to bring it into the day to day, because that's where it sits. Over the last seven years I’ve come to realise that the ripple effect of cancer is far reaching, affecting not just those of us living with it but everyone around us. 'A New Kind of Normal' gives an insight into my relationship with my then partner, now husband; my children and their reaction to my illness, my family and friends, my work colleagues, people who wrote to me, and the professionals who cared for me; everybody reacts differently. Breast cancer assaults your femininity - the treatment is tough and the surgery brutal.  It isn't easy, but it is possible, and I'd like to feel this book may be a source of comfort to anyone who's life is touched by breast cancer; maybe even help them to find their 'New Kind of Normal'. There are many things in life we may have to give up on, but hope is not one of them. (P

Cover image of 'Cancer hates kisses'

Cancer hates kisses (2017)

Dial Books for Young Readers

Author Jessica Reid Sliwerski was diagnosed with breast cancer four months after giving birth to her daughter. And through all the stages of treatment--surgery, chemotherapy, radiation, losing her hair--she thought about how hard it would be to talk to your child about cancer while coping with it. She wrote this picture book to give other parents and their children an encouraging tool for having those conversations--a lovingly upbeat book that is also refreshingly authentic and straightforward. With its simple text and heartwarming illustrations, Cancer Hates Kisses is relatable to any type of cancer. (Publisher)

Cover image of '365 days past the traffic lights'

365 days past the traffic lights (2019)

Independently published

How do you cope with the death of a parent at 24 years old? The time when you’re somewhere between independence and reliance on parents, figuring out who you are and what you want to do, and trying to maintain friendships and a social life when your world is crumbling around you and no one understands. Rose Taylor straddled two worlds; living in both a picturesque English village and an adventure filled Hollywood lifestyle in Los Angeles. But in late 2017 life hurtled her into a new realm, one that was immersed in medical settings and put her life on hold. In this compelling and emotive memoir, Rose Taylor explores the first 365 days following the death of her father. She writes frankly about the moment of diagnosis, the experience of becoming a carer for a parent and sheds light on the psychological and physical symptoms of bereavement. The book takes the reader between London, Atlanta and Los Angeles weaving together the experience of grieving and a narrative of reconciling memory and loss. The book ultimately offers a voice for grieving young adults, with the aim of showing them they are not alone. (Publisher) 

Cover image of 'Beyond'

Beyond (2019)

Burning Chair

What happens when we die? Is this really all there is? What exists beyond this life?Alex Duncan is just an ordinary 14 year old boy. His main worries are homework, girls, the school bully......and his sister, Jenna who has ovarian cancer, stage B. As his parents retreat into themselves, Alex is desperate to find a way to help, a way to make things better for his sister. After all, it’s the not knowing that’s the worst thing.Whilst he tries to untangle the ultimate question, life still goes on: his best friend seems oblivious to his feelings about her, the school bully has taken a special interest in him, and everything he does just makes him feel more and more awkward and out of place.Georgia Springate’s debut novel, Beyond, is a funny and touchingly compelling coming-of-age story about love, loss and discovery. Read it and take an emotional journey through one boy’s quest to understand that most tricky of questions: what lies beyond? (Publishers)

Cover image of 'My daddy is my superhero'

My daddy is my superhero (2018)

North Staffordshire Press

My Daddy Is My Superhero was inspired by Michaelagh's own experience of explaining her husband's brain tumour illness to her eldest son, and is intended to help begin conversations surrounding serious illness and death with young children. At its core, My Daddy Is My Superhero is about the loving relationship between a little boy and his dad. It is a story about love, fun, beauty, loss, sadness, memories and celebration. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The magical wood'

The magical wood (2018)

Lemon Drop Books

This is a story about loss, friendship and hope. The Magical Wood is set in a beautiful wood with a river wandering through. One cold and stormy day, the wind blew a terrible gale. The next day the tree family woke to find that Strongest Tree had fallen to the woodland floor and had sadly died. How would the tree family survive the seasons without the strength of Strongest Tree? Throughout each season the tree family are visited by a new animal, offering advice and support to the trees. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Beyond the pink moon. A memoir of legacy, loss and survival'

Beyond the pink moon. A memoir of legacy, loss and survival (2010)

Nicki Boscia Durlester

In this touching, frank and informative memoir, Nicki Boscia Durlester intimately chronicles her transformational journey after being diagnosed with breast cancer. Her story begins with her mother, who was diagnosed with the disease in 1962: a time when breast cancer was only discussed behind closed doors, and long before women took an active role in their diagnosis and treatment. Nicki provides unique insight into being part of a large Italian-American family afflicted with the BRCA2 gene, and shares poignant stories about her mother and aunts who faced breast and ovarian cancer with extraordinary grace and courage. Nicki writes candidly about her frustration in finding the right team of doctors as well as the highs and lows of her journey, sharing humor and heart along the way. She puts a human face on statistics ranking breast cancer as the second leading cause of cancer deaths in women in the United States. This deeply moving story of legacy, loss and ultimately survival is told through the eyes of a daughter who shared an unbreakable bond with her mother. As she travels the scary, unpredictable road through her own diagnosis, treatment and recovery, Nicki discovers the most difficult challenge she faces becomes the most spiritually transcendent experience of her life. This Special Edition of Beyond the Pink Moon includes an Afterword from the author. A portion of the proceeds from sales of this book will be donated to breast cancer research. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Under cover of darkness. How I blogged my way through mantle cell lymphoma'

Under cover of darkness. How I blogged my way through mantle cell lymphoma (2015)

O-Books

Not only is this book an inspiring survival manual for cancer patients, but its humour and objectivity make it a choice read for anyone who enjoys real-life drama and pathos. Diagnosed with Mantle Cell Lymphoma in 2012 the author resorted to a blog to keep in touch with friends, and unwittingly ended up writing about the good, the bad and the ugly side of cancer, which attracted many followers. Is there a good? Very possibly. Bad and ugly, definitely. There is also an extremely funny side - wry observations that brought humour into an otherwise bleak landscape which included chemotherapy and a stem cell transplant. The author is also blessed with a big following from the Mind, Body, Spirit community of which she is a part (including Judy Hall, Anita Moorjani, Dolores Ashcroft-Nowicki); from this outpouring of expert support came advice on nutrition and alternative therapies which help to make this an invaluable source of information for cancer patients and their carers. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Gone in the morning. A writer’s journey of bereavement'

Gone in the morning. A writer’s journey of bereavement (2018)

Jessica Kingsley Publishers

An exploration of death, bereavement and grief. This first hand account gives Geoff Mead's experience of responding to the loss of his wife from a brain tumour. Giving insight into the grieving process and how Geoff learned to manage his grief, this book will offer hope to anyone experiencing something similar. After coming to the realisation that mourning is a conscious process, to which we can apply creativity, passion and intelligence, Geoff explored the unknown territory of bereavement through his writing. The book shows how artful practice, such as writing, can help to make sense of our experience and navigate the wreckage of grief. (Publishers)

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