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The web Directory of Information Materials for People Affected by Cancer is regularly updated and currently has details of over 1,900 booklets, leaflets, books and audiovisual materials for people affected by cancer. Most have been published in the last five years but we have included some older ones that are still useful.

Results: 115

Cover image of 'Diet and nutrition'

Diet and nutrition (December 2019)

The Brain Tumour Charity

This leaflet is for anyone receiving treatment or who has recently completed their treatment.There’s no specific food or type of diet that can control or treat brain tumours, but controlling your diet may help to improve your quality of life and manage the side-effects of treatment, such as dry mouth, nausea, poor appetite, and weight loss.

Cover image of 'Hair everywhere'

Hair everywhere (2017)

Istros Books

Hair Everywhere is the story of one family and how they manage to cope when the mother is diagnosed with cancer. It is a delicate tale that balances itself between the generations, revealing their strengths and weaknesses in times of trouble. It is also a story about how roles within a family can change when things become challenging, due to sickness or death, allowing some to grow and others to fade. Ultimately, this is a book about life; full of humour and absurdity as well as sadness, and set against an everyday background where the ordinary takes on new significance and colour. Tea Tulic’s debut novel is a brave glance at the human condition. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Dear life. A doctor's story of love and loss'

Dear life. A doctor's story of love and loss (2020)

Little, Brown Book Group

As a specialist in palliative medicine, Dr Rachel Clarke chooses to inhabit a place many people would find too tragic to contemplate. Every day she tries to bring care and comfort to those reaching the end of their lives and to help make dying more bearable. Rachel's training was put to the test in 2017 when her beloved GP father was diagnosed with terminal cancer. She learned that nothing - even the best palliative care - can sugar-coat the pain of losing someone you love. And yet, she argues, in a hospice there is more of what matters in life - more love, more strength, more kindness, more joy, more tenderness, more grace, more compassion - than you could ever imagine. For if there is a difference between people who know they are dying and the rest of us, it is simply this: that the terminally ill know their time is running out, while we live as though we have all the time in the world. Dear Life is a book about the vital importance of human connection, by the doctor we would all want by our sides at a time of crisis. It is a love letter - to a father, to a profession, to life itself. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'What can I do to help? 75 practical ideas for family and friends from cancer's frontline'

What can I do to help? 75 practical ideas for family and friends from cancer's frontline (2005)

Short Books

'I count myself the luckiest and unluckiest woman in London.' Deborah Hutton's discovery that the niggling cough which had been troubling her for a couple of months was actually an aggressive lung cancer that had already invaded her bones and lymphatic system marked the beginning of a brand-new learning curve - a personal odyssey that taught her to let go of her super-competent I-can-handle-it-myself persona and gratefully accept the huge amount of help beamed at her by her close-knit family and 'world class' network of friends and neighbours. From her own experience and out of her conversations with fellow members of the Cancer Club - 'the only club I can think of which is both rigorously exclusive and which has no waiting list, ever' - comes this anthology of supremely practical examples of ways in which friends and family, often themselves reeling from the shock of the diagnosis and feeling just as helpless and at a loss as to know what to do, can make a real, substantial difference. 'What can I do to help?' she writes. Well, stand by, because the answer is 'Plenty'. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Gifted by grief. A true story of cancer, loss and rebirth'

Gifted by grief. A true story of cancer, loss and rebirth (2015)

Living Well Publications

Is it really possible to be grateful for your husband’s death? This is the message that ultimately comes over in Jane Duncan Rogers’ book Gifted By Grief: A True Story of Cancer, Loss and Rebirth. Told through the medium of blog posts by her husband in his last year, her own journal entries, and a heartfelt, poignant and riveting narrative, Jane invites the reader into her grief-stricken world. Where this might be harrowing, it is found to be ironic; where there might be pointlessness and despair, gifts are found, inspiring the reader find the gifts in their own life situation. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'A moment of grace. A story of love and loss'

A moment of grace. A story of love and loss (2018)

Ebury Press (Penguin Random House)

Patrick Dillon and Nicola Thorold were together for twenty-eight years. Patrick was an award-winning architect and writer and Nicola a leading figure in theatre, awarded an OBE for her contribution to the arts at London’s Roundhouse. Their two children were almost grown-up. Life was good. And then, in May 2015, Nicola was diagnosed with leukaemia. After several rounds of treatment, a bone marrow transplant and many waves of recovery and decline, she died thirteen months after her diagnosis. Six months later, at Christmas, Patrick started to write. A Moment of Grace is the searing, tender account of Patrick’s life with Nicola and her illness, and his life after her loss. But it is more than a story of illness and unbearable grief: it is a book of memory, of home, of family. It is a tale of the transfiguring power of love. Heartbreaking, life-affirming and truly unforgettable, A Moment of Grace is one man’s journey to find life after his wife’s death. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Who will do my hair?'

Who will do my hair? (2010)

Ulster Cancer Foundation

This illustrated book for young children aims to help them understand and prepare for the death of a parent or significant adult.

Cover image of 'I miss you. A first look at death'

I miss you. A first look at death (2009)

Wayland Books

This reassuring picture book explores the difficult issue of death for young children. Children's feelings and questions about this sensitive subject are looked at in a simple but realistic way. This book helps them to understand their loss and come to terms with it. Written by a trained psychotherapist, journalist and parent, and illustrated by an experienced children's book artist, this is part of an acclaimed and successful series of picture-book non-fiction for Early Years. Books in the series give advice and promote interaction between children, parents, and teachers on a wide variety of personal, social and emotional issues. They are excellent tools for teachers to use during classroom discussions. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The hare who lost her hair'

The hare who lost her hair (2013)

Self-published using CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

This one-of-a-kind story is a message of hope for young children and families who are undergoing chemotherapy or any difficult struggle. Without words like cancer and chemo, the kid-friendly tale follows a brave hare on her courageous journey to overcome illness. A mysterious, healing stream offers the potential to get well, but there are surprising side effects that will challenge the hare's strength and determination. This book is about believing wishes can come true even in the most extreme circumstances. Ideal for early stage cancers due to the message of survival. Perfect for pairing with honest discussions about your personal situation. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Being Sarah'

Being Sarah (2011)

Wordscapes

Being Sarah is Sarah Horton's personal story about breast cancer. As the shock of diagnosis subsides, Sarah starts looking for a treatment plan that suits her, searching for choices, and asks questions about all the medical drugs and treatment offered to her, from chemotherapy to hormone treatment. There are so many questions: in a field where so little is certain, what's best for Sarah? Why do we concentrate on cure rather than prevention? Is our terror about breast cancer sanitised by the 'pink' movement? And will I die? And there aren’t always answers. From the minutiae of getting through each day to the wider feelings of rage, hope, sadness, fear, loss, joy and helplessness, Being Sarah is about life, death, questions, options and choices. Breast cancer statistics in the UK are alarming, and the politics surrounding the illness perplexing. Mortality rates are falling, but diagnoses are rising. One in every nine women can now expect to be diagnosed with breast cancer at some time in her life, and - while we’re getting better at surviving - it’s happening more and more frequently. Sarah Horton is one of the 46,000 women diagnosed with breast cancer in the UK every year. This is her story. (Publisher)

Sorry, no publications found.
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