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The web Directory of Information Materials for People Affected by Cancer is regularly updated and currently has details of over 1,900 booklets, leaflets, books and audiovisual materials for people affected by cancer. Most have been published in the last five years but we have included some older ones that are still useful.

Results: 115

Cover image of 'A young person's guide to dealing with the loss of a brother or sister'

A young person's guide to dealing with the loss of a brother or sister (November 2019)

CLIC Sargent

The death of a brother or sister is likely to be one of the most difficult things that’s ever happened to you. It may even feel like nobody understands what you’re going through, but the fact is help is always at hand. CLIC Sargent has worked closely with young people who have lost a sibling to put together this booklet. As well as showing how this is something others have experienced, we’ve provided contacts to help you find further support and information. Even if you just want someone to talk to, you’ll find all the information you need right here.

Cover image of 'Vision loss and brain tumours. What you need to know'

Vision loss and brain tumours. What you need to know (July 2018)

The Brain Tumour Charity

This booklet summarises some of the key types of vision problems that may occur as a result of brain tumours or their treatment, and how to adapt to them. 

Cover image of 'A sky of diamonds: a story for children about loss, grief and hope'

A sky of diamonds: a story for children about loss, grief and hope (2015)

Jessica Kingsley Publishers

When Mia learns that her mother has died, all the colour in her world changes to a dreary grey. She feels guilty, angry, sad and lost (sometimes all at once!), and she doesn't know what to do to feel better. Little by little, with the help of her Dad, Mia learns how to cope with her difficult feelings. Together, they remember her mother by creating memory boxes, and they even get rid of anger by crazily sloshing paints and punching holes in newspapers! In the end, Mia finds her own, very special way of coping. When she feels sad or lonely, she looks up to the stars. Full of practical strategies, this storybook for children aged 5-9 addresses loss, grief and hope. Written from the perspective of Mia who has experienced the sudden death of her mother, it covers the different stages of grief, from initial disbelief, anger and sadness to resolution and hope. The book highlights the importance of giving children the time and space to work through their feelings and provides a host of thoughtful activities to help them cope. It also addresses some of the questions children commonly ask about death. Uniquely illustrated, this book will be an invaluable resource for anyone supporting a grieving child, especially bereavement counsellors, social workers, teachers and other school staff, as well as parents. (Publishers)

Cover image of 'Chocolate chipped. A smelly book about grief'

Chocolate chipped. A smelly book about grief (2011)

Grief Encounter Project

Chocolate Chipped tells the unique story of a young boy named Charlie and his grieving over his Dad’s death. Using real smells and Scratch & Sniff in the pages to help evoke memories, this book explores the sensitive subject of grief in an honest, engaging – and sometimes even humorous – way. Chocolate Chipped can help adults to talk openly to children about the loss of a loved one. It can be read by bereaved children to help them understand their own feelings and by other children to help them appreciate what a friend might be going through. Teachers, educational specialists as well as Bereavement Counsellors would also gain from using this book. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Grief works. Stories of life, death and surviving'

Grief works. Stories of life, death and surviving (2017)

Penguin Life

Death affects us all. Yet it is still the last taboo in our society, and grief is still profoundly misunderstood... In Grief Works we hear stories from those who have experienced great love and great loss - and survived. Stories that explain how grief unmasks our greatest fears, strips away our layers of protection and reveals our innermost selves. Julia Samuel, a grief psychotherapist, has spent twenty-five years working with the bereaved and understanding the full repercussions of loss. This deeply affecting book is full of psychological insights on how grief, if approached correctly, can heal us. Through elegant, moving stories, we learn how we can stop feeling awkward and uncertain about death, and not shy away from talking honestly with family and friends. This extraordinary book shows us how to live and learn from great loss. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Pear shaped'

Pear shaped (2015)

Self-published using CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

Adam is a 44-year-old London lawyer and father of three. Completely out of the blue, and for no reason other than sheer dumb chance, he was diagnosed with a rare and aggressive brain tumour. Adam has endured radiotherapy and chemotherapy which were preceded by major brain surgery to remove the tumour - helpfully described by his surgeon as being the size and shape of a pear. Using the blackest of humour, this book charts Adam's journey from normality to having a disease regularly described as a “death sentence”. How will he cope with the treatment? How will his relationship with family and friends be affected? Most important of all, how will his hair come through this? Quite simply, it is the funniest book so far this year about brain cancer. Warning - this book is intended for mature audiences due to the subject matter and use of strong language. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Coping with the psychological effects of illness. Strategies to manage anxiety and depression'

Coping with the psychological effects of illness. Strategies to manage anxiety and depression (2015)

Sheldon Press

Sudden, severe ill health comes as a shock and presents several challenges, most notably, loss of confidence. Suddenly people are afraid to take exercise, have sex or even go to the shops. Their entire self-image takes a battering, and this roller-coaster of uncertainty often leads to anxiety and depression. This book looks at the learning curve involved in sudden and chronic illness, and explores key ways to build psychological resilience during this time of challenge. Whether it concerns cancer, heart disease, diabetes, or a mental health condition, it explores the common psychological issues that arise when someone’s usual health and routine are disrupted, and discusses the impact of illness on relationships and family. Drawing on CBT techniques, it offers practical self-help strategies to help deal with peoples changed expectations of themselves, and with the related lifestyle changes. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Missing mummy'

Missing mummy (2012)

Macmillan Children's Books

Written and illustrated by the talented and award-winning author-illustrator Rebecca Cobb, this extraordinary book deals with the loss of a parent from a child's point of view. Perfectly pitched text and evocative artwork explore the many emotions a bereaved child may experience, from anger to guilt and from sadness to bewilderment. And importantly, the book also focuses on the positive - the recognition that the child is still part of a family, and that his memories of his mother are to be treasured. Beautifully illustrated with moments of wonderful warmth and the gentlest humour, Missing Mummy is a touching, honest and helpful book that approaches a difficult subject with great integrity. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Getting off the emotional roller coaster of cancer. A toolbox for patients, survivors, family members and caregivers'

Getting off the emotional roller coaster of cancer. A toolbox for patients, survivors, family members and caregivers (2014)

Anchor Rose Publishing

You sit across the desk from your doctor – and you learn you have cancer. As though you just got on a racing roller coaster, you’re suddenly overwhelmed with fear, anxiety, grief and depression. The journey with cancer begins. Are you prepared emotionally? Medical treatments for cancer continue to advance, yet tools to help cancer patients address their emotional wellbeing still lag behind. Physicians and psychologists now realize that healing is often greatly improved when both the physical and emotional needs of patients are met. In Getting Off the Emotional Roller Coaster of Cancer, cancer psychotherapist Niki Barr gently guides you through diagnosis, medical treatment and beyond. This groundbreaking book gives you effective, easy-to-use tools to manage your journey through cancer with confidence and calm. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Saving my arse. A story of cancers, colons and Singapore noodles'

Saving my arse. A story of cancers, colons and Singapore noodles (2008)

Mark Davies

If you or a family member or friend is diagnosed with Bowel/colon cancer then this book will hopefully be of some use and comfort. But I really wrote this book for all of those people, who thought like me that cancer and its treatments begins and ends with losing your hair and sitting around in hospitals like a displaced Hare Krishna convention, whilst having an uncontrollable urge to run the marathon. I want to allay, if at all possible, some the fears that we all have of cancer without boring anyone to tears or being over emotional. More people than ever are surviving, and go on to live a normal life. I am not a doctor, nor have I ever had any medical training, so I found that I didn't really understand a lot of what was being talked about by the doctors. Questions like: What is Chemotherapy and what does it do? What happens during Radiotherapy? (Publisher)

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