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The web Directory of Information Materials for People Affected by Cancer is regularly updated and currently has details of over 1,900 booklets, leaflets, books and audiovisual materials for people affected by cancer. Most have been published in the last five years but we have included some older ones that are still useful.

Results: 150

Cover image of 'What does super Jonny do when mum gets sick? [Spanish]'

What does super Jonny do when mum gets sick? [Spanish] (2016)

Books For Caring Kids

Jonny is a little superhero with a BIG problem. His Mum is sick. How can he help? Join Super Jonny and Bear, as they go to the hospital to investigate. LEARN who the staff working in the hospital are and what they do. DISCOVER Jonny's secret weapon. Super Jonny is recommended by teachers for teachers. The question page links to the English and New Zealand national curriculums. These questions teach the children how to help the sick. Some people need regular hospital care to manage their disease. These people have their own page entitled: Preparing for a hospital admission: 5 tips for chronically ill moms. This ensures that any mother who is going into hospital, has some supplies when her children visit. This list of simple suggestions could also be filled by any adult wanting to help a Mom who is suddenly sick. With its big bold professionally drawn illustrations, Super Jonny is a valuable resource for your family, school or medical centre. (Publisher).

Cover image of 'Polycythaemia vera [Portuguese]'

Polycythaemia vera [Portuguese] (2016)

Macmillan Cancer Support

Polycythaemia vera (PV) is a rare condition affecting the bone marrow. This factsheet describes what it is, the signs and symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment.

Cover image of 'The pink unicorns of male breast cancer'

The pink unicorns of male breast cancer (2016)

Blossom Spring Publishing

Alan Herbert is a West London born, ex forces, motorcycle riding, all action grandfather who now lives in The Netherlands with his family. In 2012, he was diagnosed with breast cancer. Alan vividly describes his battle with cancer and the often absurd situations he finds himself in as he fights not only the killer disease, but also the ignorance borne out of the feminization of breast cancer. Follow Alan’s courageous story that shows not only the determination, but the admirable spirit of a man who battled and survived. An inspirational, gripping, and down-to-earth story written from a man’s point of view in dealing with breast cancer. “Men have breasts too!” (Publisher) 

Cover image of 'Managing weight gain after cancer treatment'

Managing weight gain after cancer treatment (February 2016)

Macmillan Cancer Support

This booklet is for people living with or after cancer who want to maintain a healthy weight. It explains how making changes to diet and levels of physical activity can help people lose weight and feel better. It does not cover dietary problems such as weight loss, poor appetite or eating difficulties caused by cancer and its treatments.

Cover image of 'When your brother or sister dies. A young person's guide'

When your brother or sister dies. A young person's guide (April 2016)

CLIC Sargent

The death of a brother or sister is likely to be one of the most difficult things that’s ever happened to you. It may feel like nobody understands what you’re going through, but help is always at hand. CLIC Sargent has worked closely with young people who have lost a sibling to put together this booklet. As well as showing how this is something others have experienced, there are contacts at the back to help you find further support and information.

Cover image of 'Physical recovery after treatment'

Physical recovery after treatment (May 2015)

Lymphoma Association

This factsheet has information about recovering from the side-effects of treatment.

Cover image of 'Recognise yourself. Beauty despite cancer. A practical guide to maintaining your appearance and well-being as you go through surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, or experience hair loss'

Recognise yourself. Beauty despite cancer. A practical guide to maintaining your appearance and well-being as you go through surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, or experience hair loss (2015)

Lotus Publishing

Jennifer Young shares her knowledge and experience by showing those living with cancer and beyond how to prevent, reduce, disguise, camouflage and soothe their appearance-related side effects. Covering subjects such as wig fitting, styling, how to dress your new body, hair regrowth after treatment, and eyebrows and eyelashes, this guide to beauty, hair, style and well-being for cancer patients is the most comprehensive ever published. Jennifer is the founder of www.BeautyDespiteCancer.co.uk and creator of specialist skincare and cosmetics Defiant Beauty. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Eating - help yourself. A guide for patients with eating problems, and their families'

Eating - help yourself. A guide for patients with eating problems, and their families (July 2015)

Christie Hospital NHS Trust

Eating may be a problem for people with cancer or other illnesses, particularly when undergoing treatment such as radiotherapy or chemotherapy. This booklet has advice on how to eat well when trying to cope with loss of appetite, changes in taste, dry mouth, difficulties swallowing, feeling full, nausea, diarrhoea, and constipation. It has tips on how to make food as nourishing as possible and ideas for snacks and drinks.

Cover image of 'Symptoms of lymphoma in detail'

Symptoms of lymphoma in detail (November 2015)

Lymphoma Association

This information gives details about the symptoms of lymphoma and the possible reasons for them. 

Cover image of 'Nowhere hair'

Nowhere hair (2015)

Thousand Words Press

The little girl in Nowhere Hair knows two things: Her mom's hair is not on her head anymore, so therefore it must be somewhere around the house. After searching the obvious places, the story reveals that her mother, although going through cancer treatment, is still silly, attentive, happy and yes, sometimes very tired and cranky. She learns that she didn't cause the cancer, can't catch it, and that Mommy still is very much up for the job of mothering. The book, written in rhyme, explains hats, scarves, wigs, going bald in public, and the idea of being nice to people who may look a little different than you. It ends with the idea that what is inside of us is far more important than how we look on the outside. For any parent or grandparent, Nowhere Hair offers a comfortable platform to explain something that is inherently very difficult. (Publisher)

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