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The web Directory of Information Materials for People Affected by Cancer is regularly updated and currently has details of over 1,900 booklets, leaflets, books and audiovisual materials for people affected by cancer. Most have been published in the last five years but we have included some older ones that are still useful.

Results: 109

Cover image of 'Hair loss'

Hair loss (September 2018)

Lymphoma Association

Some lymphoma treatments can cause your hair to thin or fall out. Knowing what to expect and what you can do about it may help you cope with losing your hair. This factsheet has advice on how to care for your hair and scalp during and after treatment. It also tells you about some of the options you may wish to consider until your hair grows back. 

Cover image of 'Anna loses her hair. A children’s guide to hair loss as a result of cancer treatment'

Anna loses her hair. A children’s guide to hair loss as a result of cancer treatment (October 2018)

Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group

Hair loss is a common side effect of having chemotherapy and of radiotherapy to the head. This book tells the story of Anna, Jack and Laura who all lose their hair while having treatment for cancer and helps young children to understand what might happen.

Cover image of 'Breast cancer and hair loss'

Breast cancer and hair loss (January 2018)

Breast Cancer Care

Many people will lose either some or all of their hair as a result of treatment for breast cancer. For some, this is the most distressing side effect of treatment. Some people find that being prepared for hair loss before it occurs helps them cope better when it happens. This booklet explains how you may lose your hair and the effect it can have. It looks at how to care for your hair and scalp during and after treatment and the different headwear you may want to try, including wigs and headscarves. It includes step-by-step guides to tying headscarves and tips on recreating the illusion of eyebrows and eyelashes. The final part of the booklet discusses what usually happens when your hair grows back and how to look after it.

Cover image of 'Menopausal symptoms and breast cancer'

Menopausal symptoms and breast cancer (March 2018)

Breast Cancer Care

A booklet for women who are experiencing menopausal symptoms after breast cancer treatment. It has advice on treatments (prescription drugs and complementary therapies) and practical measures for coping with hot flushes, vaginal dryness, loss of libido, mood swings, joint pain and risk of osteoporosis. Includes details of further support.

Cover image of 'Coping with hair loss'

Coping with hair loss (August 2017)

Macmillan Cancer Support

This booklet is about hair loss. It is for anyone coping with changes to their hair during and after cancer treatment. It explains how cancer treatment may affect your hair, how to prepare for and cope with hair loss, and what to expect after treatment finishes.

Cover image of 'Side effects of cancer treatment'

Side effects of cancer treatment (January 2017)

Macmillan Cancer Support

This factsheet is about some of the side effects of cancer treatment.

Cover image of 'Chemotherapy. Your questions answered'

Chemotherapy. Your questions answered (November 2017)

The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust

This booklet describes what chemotherapy is, how it works, how treatment is planned and carried out, and possible side-effects; for example, anaemia, infection, appetite changes, nausea, skin changes, hair loss, and fertility problems. It also briefly discusses issues such as emotional well-being and fatigue. Includes further sources of information and support.

Cover image of 'Side effects of cancer treatment'

Side effects of cancer treatment (March 2017)

Macmillan Cancer Support

An overview of some of the more common side-effects that might happen with cancer treatments: bone marrow and blood, fatigue, mouth problems, nausea and vomiting, diarrhoea and constipation, eating problems, skin, fertility, sex life, hormonal changes. The booklet suggests ways of dealing with them.

Cover image of 'Having a bad hair day'

Having a bad hair day (2017)

Clare C Davison

“Tomorrow, you will feel a little bit better.” From a loving childhood, belonging to a large family with no history of breast cancer, Clare was alarmed at age 42 to accidentally discover she had the disease. As a self-employed single mum, Clare documents her memoirs of personal experience and knowledge of the cruel decisions made for the aggressive treatments and hair loss ahead. With an inner strength of humour, Clare’s first book includes her lunch arrangements with Peter Andre, a cake nationally released in her honour, an experience of public speaking, media attention and continued fundraising with a moving excerpt from her son. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Pretty sick. The beauty guide for woman with cancer. How to look your best when you feel your worst'

Pretty sick. The beauty guide for woman with cancer. How to look your best when you feel your worst (2017)

Piatkus Books

The ultimate resource to looking your best during and after cancer treatment, from a veteran beauty industry insider. Like many women who receive the shattering diagnosis of cancer, Caitlin Kiernan was concerned about her health and her future, but also about how the treatment would affect how she felt and looked - would she lose her hair? Would she lose her nails? How would she look after a double mastectomy? But unlike other women who battle cancer, Kiernan has spent her entire career as a beauty editor, beauty director (most recently for Life & Style Weekly), and now beauty producer. As someone who works in the public eye and in the fashion industry, Kiernan had to quickly learn how to look her best even when she was feeling her worst. So she called on her list of extensive contacts and beauty insiders - from hair professionals to top medical doctors (at institutions like Memorial Sloan Kettering and Mt Sinai Hospital) to style mavens and even celebrities (including Wendy Williams and Hoda Kotb) - to gather the best and most useful beauty tips for cancer treatment. The result is Pretty Sick: the ultimate guide to beauty during (and after) cancer treatment, covering skin care, hair care (and wig shopping), nail care, makeup, an explanation of breast cancer surgical options, style advice for life post mastectomy, and much, much more. Illustrated with charming line drawings and peppered with advice from celebrities and cancer survivors, Pretty Sick will be a welcome and trusted resource during treatment, helping women to look their best even when they don't feel their best. (Publisher)

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