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The web Directory of Information Materials for People Affected by Cancer is regularly updated and currently has details of over 1,900 booklets, leaflets, books and audiovisual materials for people affected by cancer. Most have been published in the last five years but we have included some older ones that are still useful.

Results: 19

Cover image of 'Want to cut your cancer risk?'

Want to cut your cancer risk? (April 2017)

Cancer Research UK

Information about how lifestyle choices can reduce cancer risk: not smoking; keeping a healthy weight; drinking less alcohol; keeping active; a healthy diet; and safer sex.

Cover image of 'Men's health guide'

Men's health guide (2019)

World Cancer Research Fund

Diet and lifestyle recommendations to reduce cancer risk, including weight, diet, alcohol, and physical activity. Includes brief information on the most common symptoms of prostate, bowel, lung, mouth and throat, oesophageal and testicular cancer and information on screening tests where applicable.

Cover image of 'Ten top tips for a healthy weight'

Ten top tips for a healthy weight (July 2017)

Cancer Research UK

Tips, based on scientific evidence, to help people control their weight by taking in fewer calories and using more energy. 

Cover image of 'Let's eat and drink healthily'

Let's eat and drink healthily (June 2019)

Cancer Research UK

What we eat and drink can affect our cancer risk. Eating healthily has loads of benefits, helping you keep a healthy weight and and helping reduce the risk of cancer. This leaflet has advice and tips to help people make changes. 

Cover image of 'Healthy eating guidelines. A guide to supporting health with good nutrition for people affected by cancer.'

Healthy eating guidelines. A guide to supporting health with good nutrition for people affected by cancer. (January 2017)

Penny Brohn UK

This booklet has been written for people affected by cancer or those wishing to reduce their risk of cancer. It contains general guidance and is not meant to be prescriptive. Everyone has unique nutritional requirements that depend, amongst other things, on genetic make up, medical history, stage of treatment, current state of health, and lifestyle, as well as tastes and preferences. The guidelines can be adapted to suit your own tastes and needs. If you have special dietary needs or problems with eating, swallowing, digestion, or weight loss you should seek further advice from a nutritionally-qualified health professional who has experience of working with people affected by cancer. 

Cover image of 'Food safety guidelines for people at risk of neutropenia'

Food safety guidelines for people at risk of neutropenia (November 2015)

Wessex Cancer Trust

Tips for people at risk of neutropaenia about basic food hygiene, storing and preparing food and drink, and foods to avoid.

Cover image of 'The breast cancer cookbook'

The breast cancer cookbook (2015)

Quadrille Publishing Ltd

A specifically tailored lifestyle cookbook to combat breast cancer, from surgical oncologist Professor Mo Keshtgar. Breast cancer is by far the most common cancer in women, affecting 1 in 8 women in the UK. It is now known that diet and lifestyle are significant risk factors in the development of the disease. Adopting a healthier diet can reduce the risk of getting breast cancer and improve the survival of patients who have been diagnosed. Breast cancer specialist Mo Keshtgar takes you through the risk factors and specific dietary associations with breast cancer, including phytoestrogens, fruit and vegetables, fats and dairy products. Advice on foods to avoid, foods to eat in moderation and foods to eat more of follows, with simple suggestions as to how to achieve these changes. The enticing collection of over 100 recipes covers breakfasts, soups, salads, fish and shellfish, poultry and meat, vegetarian dishes, treats and drinks. All the dishes have been specifically created to take in all the dietary considerations linked to breast cancer and the possible side effects of treatments. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Say no to cancer'

Say no to cancer (2010)

Piatkus Books

Cancer is increasing at an alarming rate and one in three people will develop cancer at some point in their lives. According to the World Cancer Research Fund, up to 39 per cent of the most common cancers - lung, breast, colorectal, skin, mouth/throat and oesophagus, liver, stomach, prostate, cervical ovarian, testicular, endometrial and pancreatic - are preventable through diet, physical activity and weight control alone. "Say no to cancer" was originally published by Piatkus in 1999 and this greatly expanded edition contains new chapters that reflect the very latest information on the connection between diet and lifestyle and the risk of developing cancer. It offers guidance for people who wish to avoid getting cancer, and for those who want to know what they can do nutritionally if they have cancer and/or want to prevent reoccurrence. By improving your diet and taking the right nutritional supplements you really can say no to cancer. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Knowledge empowers. Don't get caught outAn awareness presentation'

Knowledge empowers. Don't get caught outAn awareness presentation (2010)

PCaSO Prostate Cancer Support Network

A DVD with information about prostate cancer as follows: Prostate basics; The prostate; Age; Seeing your GP; Active surveillance; Can prostate cancer be avoided?; Risk factors and symptoms; Common problems; Ethnicity; Explaining all symptoms and concerns; Watchful waiting; Comparison between Eastern and Western diets; Testing and referral; Significance of prostate cancer; Diet and lifestyle; Asking for a PSA test; Surgery, radiotherapy, HIFU, cryotherapy, PDT; World-wide evidence; Treatment options; Family connections; Note the result; Hormone therapy; What's involved?; Diet, nutrition and lifestyle guidance; Chemotherapy; Lifestyle guidance.

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