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The web Directory of Information Materials for People Affected by Cancer is regularly updated and currently has details of over 1,900 booklets, leaflets, books and audiovisual materials for people affected by cancer. Most have been published in the last five years but we have included some older ones that are still useful.

Results: 427

Cover image of 'Eating right for your health'

Eating right for your health (August 2015)

CLIC Sargent

This factsheet for children and young people with cancer aged 13 and over has advice about healthy eating during treatment and how to cope with common problems, such as: loss of appetite; weight loss; sore mouth and throat; dry mouth; changes in taste; diarrhoea; and constipation.

Cover image of 'We beat leukaemia. My family's journey with childhood cancer'

We beat leukaemia. My family's journey with childhood cancer (2015)

I_AM Self-Publishing

My son Andrew was only three years old when he was diagnosed with Leukaemia. Now he’s a healthy, happy six-year-old. We Beat Leukemia is my honest account of chemo, childhood and being a mummy to cancer – written over 1235 days from diagnosis to remission. I started writing daily posts to record the highs and lows, frustrations and elations of his childhood cancer treatment. My posts and photos form this book. I’m sharing my family’s experience to raise awareness of childhood cancer (and the UK charities who can offer so much), but also to offer support to families facing the challenges that any child cancer diagnosis brings. I hope to make a difference in the cancer community. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Given time to say goodbye'

Given time to say goodbye (2015)

Three Boys Publishing

‘Given time to say goodbye’ is a profoundly honest and true story of a daughter who loses both parents to cancer. The author, Dianne Leutner, a Dutch national, living in England takes the reader on a journey from the simple happiness of undisturbed family life with a young family through the roller coaster of emotion that comes with a diagnosis of terminal cancer to, eventually, death – or in her case multiple deaths – in the family. She tells her story with exemplary clarity and honesty as she faces the illness and death of both parents, not shying away from a candid appraisal of family dynamics and personal emotions. Living in the UK whilst her parents were dying in the Netherlands was also a major obstacle. The family kept a blog during both illnesses some of which also features in the book. The other voices bring a reality and genuineness to the text. The blog includes the voice that is often lost, of the person experiencing terminal cancer. There will be much that will chime with readers who have been involved in the daily care of people at the end of their lives and who have known bereavement. It is not always easy to be interested in someone else’s family and yet we are drawn into the lives of these ordinary people who are remarkable in their own way. They show us that there is great possibility for growth, love and true wonder in all emotions. Dianne illustrates beautifully that we will all experience grief differently and that our experiences will be a reflection of the unique relationship we have with ourselves and our dearly departed. ‘Given time to say goodbye’ is not a memoir filled with answers but the unravelling of grief into hope, revealing light that leads you forward. (Author)

Cover image of 'Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) in children'

Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) in children (April 2014)

Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group

Written to accompany 'Children and young people with cancer: A parent's guide', this factsheet explains what acute myeloid leukaemia is, and describes the signs, symptoms, tests and treatment options.

Cover image of 'Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) in children'

Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) in children (April 2014)

Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group

Written to accompany 'Children and young people with cancer: A parent's guide', this factsheet explains what acute lymphoblastic leukaemia is, and describes the signs, symptoms, tests and treatment options.

Cover image of 'Brain tumours'

Brain tumours (April 2014)

Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group

Written to accompany 'Children and young people with cancer: A parent's guide', this factsheet explains what a brain tumour is, and describes the signs and symptoms, tests and treatment options.

Cover image of 'Wilms' tumour'

Wilms' tumour (April 2014)

Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group

Written to accompany 'Children and young people with cancer: A parent's guide', this factsheet explains what Wilm's tumour is, and describes the signs and symptoms, tests and treatment options.

Cover image of 'Rhabdomyosarcoma'

Rhabdomyosarcoma (April 2014)

Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group

Written to accompany 'Children and young people with cancer: A parent's guide', this factsheet explains what rhabdomyosarcoma is, and describes the signs and symptoms, tests and treatment options.

Cover image of 'I have finished my treatment... what happens next'

I have finished my treatment... what happens next (August 2014)

Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group

This booklet for children and teenagers aged 10-16 aims to help answer questions and concerns that arise when treatment for cancer finishes. It covers feelings and emotions, coping with worry, coping with family and friends, school and college, healthy living, and practical issues such as what happens at follow-up, medicines, and what to look out for.

Cover image of 'Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL)'

Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) (April 2014)

Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group

Written to accompany 'Children and young people with cancer: A parent's guide', this factsheet explains what non-Hodgkin lymphoma is, and describes the signs, symptoms, tests and treatment options.

Cover image of 'Retinoblastoma'

Retinoblastoma (April 2014)

Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group

Written to accompany 'Children and young people with cancer: A parent's guide', this factsheet explains what retinoblastoma is, and describes the signs and symptoms, tests and treatment options.

Cover image of 'Germ cell tumours'

Germ cell tumours (April 2014)

Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group

Written to accompany 'Children and young people with cancer: A parent's guide', this factsheet explains what a germ cell tumour is and describes the signs, symptoms, tests and treatment options.

Cover image of 'How can the internet help us? A guide for parents and families using online childhood cancer information'

How can the internet help us? A guide for parents and families using online childhood cancer information (May 2014)

Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group

Leaflet with guidance on using the internet to find information on cancer care and treatment for young people and children. Includes details of 16 useful websites.

Cover image of 'When your brother or sister has cancer. Information for older children'

When your brother or sister has cancer. Information for older children (February 2014)

Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group

This illustrated booklet is aimed at children aged 9-16 whose sibling has cancer. It describes what cancer is and how it is treated. Children describe their experiences, how they felt and how they coped.

Cover image of 'Children and young people with cancer. A parent's guide'

Children and young people with cancer. A parent's guide (February 2014)

Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group

Booklet for parents and carers of a child who has been diagnosed with cancer. It provides information about children's cancers, the treatments that can be used and their possible side effects. It also discusses how a cancer diagnosis can affect the family.

Cover image of 'A family companion to the Together for Short Lives core care pathway for children with life-limiting and life-threatening conditions'

A family companion to the Together for Short Lives core care pathway for children with life-limiting and life-threatening conditions (August 2014)

Together for Short Lives

This booklet is for parents, family members and carers of children and young people who have been diagnosed with a life-limiting and life-threatening condition. It acts as a step-by-step guide through what happens after diagnosis, explaining what should happen, and the support that should be available.

Cover image of 'I have a friend who has cancer'

I have a friend who has cancer (March 2014)

Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group

This illustrated leaflet for children has a list of things that the child with cancer may want their friends to know.

Cover image of 'Langerhan's cell histiocytosis (LCH)'

Langerhan's cell histiocytosis (LCH) (April 2014)

Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group

Written to accompany 'Children and young people with cancer: A parent's guide', this factsheet explains what Langerhan's cell histiocytosis is, and briefly describes the signs, symptoms, tests and treatment.

Cover image of 'Radiotherapy'

Radiotherapy (April 2014)

Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group

This factsheet has been written to accompany 'Children and young people with cancer: a parent's guide'. It describes what radiotherapy is, how treatment is planned, what happens during treatment, follow up, and how parents might feel.

Cover image of 'Radiotherapy for children'

Radiotherapy for children (February 2014)

The Brain Tumour Charity

This factsheet has information on radiotherapy in children and some of its possible side effects.

Cover image of 'Chemotherapy for children'

Chemotherapy for children (February 2014)

The Brain Tumour Charity

This factsheet has information about the use of chemotherapy to treat brain tumours in children.

Cover image of 'When your child dies'

When your child dies (July 2014)

CLIC Sargent

One of a series of three booklets written using the experiences of parents whose child has died of cancer. This booklet describes what will happen when a child dies in hospital, at home or in a hospice. It has guidance and advice on registering the death, and planning and coping with the funeral.

Cover image of 'Cancer and treatment. A guide for young people'

Cancer and treatment. A guide for young people (December 2014)

CLIC Sargent

This booklet has been written to help teenagers and young people (13+) understand more about cancer, its treatment, how it may affect them, and how to look after themselves while having treatment. It briefly describes cancer, diagnosis and tests, treatment options (surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, steroids, stem cell treatment), the care team, and bone marrow, and neutropaenia and infection. It also has advice on handling side effects and what happens after treatment ends.

Cover image of 'Living without your child'

Living without your child (July 2014)

CLIC Sargent

One of a series of three booklets written using the experiences of parents whose child has died of cancer. This booklet has advice and guidance on dealing with grief, dealing with other people, supporting other children, wider family and friends, as well as practical issues such as what to do with the child's personal belongings and their room.

Cover image of 'Childhood brain tumours'

Childhood brain tumours (February 2014)

The Brain Tumour Charity

This factsheet briefly describes brain tumours in children, the risk factors, diagnosis, treatment options and long-term side effects. It also describes the different types of brain tumours in children.

Cover image of 'When your child isn't going to get better'

When your child isn't going to get better (July 2014)

CLIC Sargent

This booklet has been written using the real experiences of bereaved parents to support parents and carers when they are told that their child will die of cancer. It has advice and guidance on emotions, making informed choices, getting support, what to tell other children, close family and friends, how to deal with offers of help, informing the school, work, and coping with the death of the child.

Cover image of 'The diary of a mother, her son and his monster'

The diary of a mother, her son and his monster (2014)

Empire Publications

Caroline Burch experienced every parent's worst nightmare when her son Elliot was diagnosed with cancer when he was just six months old. To document her experiences she kept a diary detailing the ups and downs of her son's treatment and the emotional anguish of their situation from diagnosis to remission. Ten years later, and with Elliot happily recovered from the condition that threatened his life, Caroline looks back at the traumatic months when there appeared to be no end in sight to the misery. Caroline's story is proof that there is life after cancer and this book is a tribute to the tireless work of the individuals who help parents and their children emerge from their nightmare. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Back to school. Supporting a pupil with cancer at your school'

Back to school. Supporting a pupil with cancer at your school (March 2014)

CLIC Sargent

DVD for school staff, to help them support young people following their return to school after a cancer diagnosis. It shows the experiences of young people and covers the emotional impact of returning to education after diagnosis and treatment and how staff can help pupils reintegrate into school life.

Cover image of 'Teenage lymphoedema'

Teenage lymphoedema (June 2014)

Lymphoedema Support Network

Leaflet addressing the concerns of young people diagnosed with lymphoedema: for example, what it is, and the treatment options. Includes quotes from young people with lymphoedema

Cover image of 'Dexamethasone. A self help guide for parents'

Dexamethasone. A self help guide for parents (April 2013)

Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group

Advice and guidance on managing the behaviour of children taking dexamethasone as part of treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

Cover image of 'Stem cell transplant. A guide to stem cell transplantation for teenagers and young adults'

Stem cell transplant. A guide to stem cell transplantation for teenagers and young adults (January 2013)

Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group

This guide describes stem cells and explains what a stem cell transplantation is, why it might be necessary, and the different types of transplants. It also describes the process of finding a donor, the pre-transplant operation, the transplant team, what to bring to hospital, preparing to receive a bone marrow transplant, what happens during the transplant and afterwards, the side-effects, getting ready to go home and getting back to normal. Includes details of useful organisations and a glossary.

Cover image of 'Sam and Lucy visit the dentist. A children's guide to mouthcare'

Sam and Lucy visit the dentist. A children's guide to mouthcare (February 2013)

Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group

Storybook for children who are having treatment for cancer about looking after their teeth and going to the dentist.

Cover image of 'Donating your child's tissue for research'

Donating your child's tissue for research (November 2013)

Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group

This leaflet uses a question and answer format to provide information about donating a child's tissue for research. It covers issues such as the importance of biological studies and tissue banks, how the samples are stored, who owns the samples, confidentiality, and the safeguards in place.

Cover image of 'Neurosurgery in children'

Neurosurgery in children (October 2013)

The Brain Tumour Charity

This factsheet gives an overview of surgery for brain tumours in children.

Cover image of 'Steroids for children'

Steroids for children (September 2013)

The Brain Tumour Charity

This factsheet summarises when and why children might be given steroids.

Cover image of 'Scans for children'

Scans for children (September 2013)

The Brain Tumour Charity

Information about CT and MRI scans for the parents/carers of a child with a brain tumour.

Cover image of 'Learning difficulties and brain tumours in children'

Learning difficulties and brain tumours in children (September 2013)

The Brain Tumour Charity

This factsheet gives an overview of some of the common learning difficulties a child may experience as the result of a brain tumour and provides information about the support available to assist them in their learning.

Cover image of 'In our own words. Parents talk about life after their child has died of cancer'

In our own words. Parents talk about life after their child has died of cancer (April 2013)

CLIC Sargent

This booklet has been written for families whose children have cancer. It includes sections on the circles of grief, changes in grief over time, how relationships are affected, the dual process model of coping with grief, remembering your child, spirituality, and dealing with other people's responses. The text is interspersed with quotes from people whose child has died.

Cover image of 'Helping your child to eat'

Helping your child to eat (September 2013)

The Brain Tumour Charity

Practical suggestions for parents/carers to helping their child to eat if they have had treatment for a brain tumour.

Cover image of 'Your child's health team'

Your child's health team (September 2013)

The Brain Tumour Charity

This factsheet outlines the roles of some of the health care professionals who may be part of a child’s multidisciplinary team.

Cover image of 'Anthem for Jackson Dawes'

Anthem for Jackson Dawes (2013)

Bloomsbury Children's Books

Megan Bright and Jackson Dawes are two teenagers who first meet each other on the hospital ward where they are both being treated for cancer. Megan is scared and worried about her illness, but Jackson seems to be an old hand, having been on the ward for ages. And everybody loves Jackson! He is a whirlwind of life and energy, warmth and sparkle. Megan will need to borrow some of Jackson's extraordinary optimism to face her and Jackson's future. A moving story of first love and a remarkably powerful debut novel. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The hare who lost her hair'

The hare who lost her hair (2013)

Self-published using CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

This one-of-a-kind story is a message of hope for young children and families who are undergoing chemotherapy or any difficult struggle. Without words like cancer and chemo, the kid-friendly tale follows a brave hare on her courageous journey to overcome illness. A mysterious, healing stream offers the potential to get well, but there are surprising side effects that will challenge the hare's strength and determination. This book is about believing wishes can come true even in the most extreme circumstances. Ideal for early stage cancers due to the message of survival. Perfect for pairing with honest discussions about your personal situation. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The dog, the chick and the reindeer. The story of a family living with cancer'

The dog, the chick and the reindeer. The story of a family living with cancer (2013)

Apollo Publishing

In 2004 my mother asked us to donate to the Macmillan team in lieu of a present. It is ironic that she then developed and survived endometrial cancer in 2006 and was diagnosed with and died from ovarian cancer in 2012, especially as the Macmillan team supported us to keep her in the home she loved right to the end. The story tells of the effects of both cancers on Mum and the rest of the family. Naturally there were sad times and some excruciatingly painful and stressful times but there were also some funny and touching moments. Audrey, Mum's sister was coincidentally diagnosed with oesophageal cancer and at one point they were in different wards at opposite ends of the same hospital. The day we were told of Mum’s diagnosis, we wheeled her down to sit with Audrey and they held hands and hugged, one in a wheelchair and the other hooked up to all kinds of machinery. Audrey died thirteen days after mum. There is no doubt that my mother loved her family - she had nearly ninety children, grandchildren, great grandchildren and great, great grandchildren, both biological and adopted; whilst the story is written from my perspective, I wasn't the only one to suffer and it could easily have been written by thirty or forty other people. When I found out mum had a terminal illness I made up my mind to take her back to her home, which is the only place she wanted to be; some people thought I was mad but we had a dedicated team of family and were lucky to be further supported by her GP, the DN’s and Macmillan team. I organised weekly rotas to ensure 24 hour care: The book tells how we coped with this and of my panic the day I found out the Macmillan support team didn’t have any sitters for the following week. It also portrays the “normal” things we did along as we rode our six year emotional roller coaster, such as going on holidays and dealing with other family crises. The last twelve months before her death were intolerable. The last six months a nightmare, and the ten weeks between diagnosis and her passing were hell on earth but we had some laughs, we cried and we sang songs. A few weeks before she died, as my daughter entered the room Mum was playing a game with my younger grandchildren, throwing the tiny purple chick to each of them in turn and giggling along with them, its tail flashing as though it too was enjoying the fun. I initially wrote the book to help me deal with my own grief, stress and feelings of guilt that I was glad she had finally let g

Cover image of 'Talking to school children about cancer'

Talking to school children about cancer (May 2012)

CLIC Sargent

Guidance for primary school teachers on how to talk to children about cancer when one of their classmates has cancer.

Cover image of 'Bone marrow and stem cell transplantation (BMT) - for children and adults'

Bone marrow and stem cell transplantation (BMT) - for children and adults (February 2012)

Bloodwise

This booklet explains why stem cell transplants are needed, the sources of stem cells, the type of transplant (autologous and allogeneic), the transplant procedure itself and the risks of transplantation.

Cover image of 'Children with cancer - information for teachers'

Children with cancer - information for teachers (May 2012)

CLIC Sargent

Guidance for primary school teachers on how they can help when a child has cancer, for example what to do when the child is off school, how to talk to classmates about what is happening and what to do when the child returns to school.

Cover image of 'Spiritual, religious and cultural wishes'

Spiritual, religious and cultural wishes (November 2012)

Together for Short Lives

This factsheet explains how spirituality, religion and cultural background can shape a family's wishes. It and aims to help families to ask professionals to care for their child according to their values or beliefs.

Cover image of 'Understanding sibling's needs'

Understanding sibling's needs (November 2012)

Together for Short Lives

This factsheet is for parents or carers of a child with a life-threatening or life-limiting disease. It has guidance about talking to the child's siblings about the diagnosis and what might happen.

Cover image of 'Travel insurance and kidney cancer'

Travel insurance and kidney cancer (March 2011)

James Whale Fund for Kidney Cancer

Cover image of 'A parent's guide: making critical care choices for your child'

A parent's guide: making critical care choices for your child (December 2011)

Together for Short Lives

This leaflet is for parents, carers or legal guardians of a child with a life-limiting or life-threatening condition who are thinking about critical care options. It explains what critical care choices are, describes an end of life care plan and discusses concerns such as: making an informed choice; making the most of time left; feeling under pressure to make a quick decision; talking to the child; and disagreeing with the health care professionals. Includes details of sources of support.

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