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The web Directory of Information Materials for People Affected by Cancer is regularly updated and currently has details of over 1,900 booklets, leaflets, books and audiovisual materials for people affected by cancer. Most have been published in the last five years but we have included some older ones that are still useful.

Results: 442

Cover image of 'Helping your child to eat well during cancer treatment. A practical information guide for parents and families of a child or young person with cancer'

Helping your child to eat well during cancer treatment. A practical information guide for parents and families of a child or young person with cancer (October 2018)

Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group

Children with cancer may experience problems with eating and drinking at some stage. This can be due to the cancer or its treatment. This booklet has ideas on helping children with a poor appetite and other eating problems.

Cover image of 'Practical advice for parents and carers of children (under 18) with lymphoma'

Practical advice for parents and carers of children (under 18) with lymphoma (November 2018)

Lymphoma Action

This factsheet covers common practical concerns of parents and carers looking after children and young people with lymphoma: When your child is diagnosed; Telling your child; Where your child will be treated; Changes to expect at home; If your child becomes unwell at home; Your child’s diet during treatment; Going back to school; Looking after yourself; Further information and support.

Cover image of 'Searching for information and support online. Help and advice for parents and families of children, teenagers and young adults with cancer'

Searching for information and support online. Help and advice for parents and families of children, teenagers and young adults with cancer (December 2018)

Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group

The huge amount of information online can be overwhelming, and sometimes conflicting, causing even more worry and stress. It is important that parents make sure that health information is filtered and gathered from reliable, easy to understand sources. As a parent or carer of a newly-diagnosed child, you may not feel confident when searching through cancer information. This leaflet offers advice and tips on where to start and what to look for.

Cover image of 'Lymphoma in children'

Lymphoma in children (November 2018)

Lymphoma Action

This factsheet about lymphoma in children (0 to 14 years old) is primarily intended for parents and carers and covers: What is lymphoma?; Types of lymphoma in children; Symptoms; Tests; Outlook; Treatment; Side effects and late effects of treatment; Relapsed and refractory lymphoma; After treatment; Further information and support.

Cover image of 'Lymphoma in young people'

Lymphoma in young people (November 2018)

Lymphoma Action

This factsheet is about lymphoma in people up to the age of 24. It covers the following topics: What is lymphoma?; Symptoms; Tests, diagnosis and staging; Types of lymphoma in young people; Outlook; Treatment; Side effects and late effects of treatment; Relapsed and refractory lymphoma; After treatment.

Cover image of 'Practical advice for young people with lymphoma'

Practical advice for young people with lymphoma (November 2018)

Lymphoma Action

Practical advice on issues that often concern teenagers and young adults (up to 24 years old) with lymphoma. It covers: After diagnosis; Where you will be treated; Your medical team; Looking after yourself; School, university and work; Relationships; After treatment.

Cover image of 'Cancer and genetics. How cancer sometimes runs in families'

Cancer and genetics. How cancer sometimes runs in families (September 2018)

Macmillan Cancer Support

This booklet is for people who are worried that cancer might run in the family. It explains how genes work, the role of genes in the development of some cancers, how risk is inherited, and the role of genetic counselling and testing. It also includes information on preventing cancer and the role of genes in specific cancers (bowel, breast, ovarian). Includes details of useful organisations and other resources.

Cover image of 'Cancer WTF? Want the facts?'

Cancer WTF? Want the facts? (February 2018)

CLIC Sargent

Hearing you have cancer throws you into a world of “unknowns”. It’s like finding yourself in the middle of a maze with no clue how you’re supposed to find your way back out again. It’s confusing and scary when you don’t know which way to turn. But that’s where we all step in – your loved ones, care and medical professionals and the many organisations dedicated to supporting you. We’ll make sure that you will never be alone through this, and can set you on the right path until everything starts making sense again. This booklet should help you on your way.

Cover image of 'Understanding womb (endometrial) cancer'

Understanding womb (endometrial) cancer (July 2018)

Macmillan Cancer Support

This booklet is about a type of womb cancer called endometrial cancer. It is for anyone who has been diagnosed with this type of cancer. There is also information for carers, family members and friends. The booklet explains how these cancers are diagnosed and treated. It gives information about coping during and after treatment.

Cover image of 'Understanding cancer of the ovary, fallopian tube and peritoneum'

Understanding cancer of the ovary, fallopian tube and peritoneum (July 2018)

Macmillan Cancer Support

This booklet is about cancer of the ovary, fallopian tube and peritoneum. It is for anyone who has been diagnosed with one of these types of cancer. There is also information for carers, family members and friends. The booklet explains the signs and symptoms of these cancers, and  how they are diagnosed and treated. It also has information about emotional, practical and financial issues. <!-- ?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" ? -->

Cover image of 'Early diagnosis of brain tumours'

Early diagnosis of brain tumours (2018)

Headsmart

Leaflet with information about the common symptoms of brain tumours in children and young people and what to do if a child is experiencing any of the symptoms. It also has information about the Headsmart campaign and details of further support.

Cover image of 'Tom has lymphoma [Welsh]'

Tom has lymphoma [Welsh] (November 2018)

CLIC Sargent|Lymphoma Action

Tom is ten years old when he is diagnosed with lymphoma. This illustrated, colour storybook for parents to read with their children describes what happens when he has to go to the hospital for tests and treatment. The story follows Tom from when he first feels ill, through diagnosis and treatment, to recovery and return to normal life.

Cover image of 'The cancer guide for young people. What to expect when you're affected by cancer'

The cancer guide for young people. What to expect when you're affected by cancer (February 2018)

Macmillan Cancer Support

A booklet for young people aged 12-25 years. It aims to help answer some of their questions and to provide tips and guidance. It explains what cancer is and how it can be treated. It also gives practical tips about coping with treatment, relationships and sorting out practical things like school, university, work, and money.

Cover image of 'Echo's sister'

Echo's sister (2018)

HarperCollins

Twelve-year-old El has planned on making her first week at a new school fantastic. She won’t go by her given name, Laughter. She’ll sit in the back of the classroom where she can make new friends. She won’t even have time to think about all the fun her old friends are having without her. Everything will be great. But when her dad picks her up after school and tells her that her younger sister, Echo, has a life-threatening illness, her world is suddenly turned upside down. And with her parents now pressed for time and money, El feels lost and powerless. Then she befriends Octavius, the only other kid in school who gets what she’s going through. As El begins to adjust to her new life, she soon finds that maybe a little hope and a lot of love can overcome any obstacle. (Publishers)

Cover image of 'What now? A practical guide for parents and carers'

What now? A practical guide for parents and carers (February 2018)

CLIC Sargent

A booklet for parents of children diagnosed with cancer.

Cover image of 'In our own words. Parents talk about life after their child has died of cancer'

In our own words. Parents talk about life after their child has died of cancer (January 2018)

CLIC Sargent

This booklet has been written for families whose children have cancer. It includes sections on the circles of grief, changes in grief over time, how relationships are affected, the dual process model of coping with grief, remembering your child, spirituality, and dealing with other people's responses. The text is interspersed with quotes from people whose child has died.

Cover image of 'Follow the child. Planning and having the best end-of-life care for your child'

Follow the child. Planning and having the best end-of-life care for your child (2018)

Jessica Kingsley Publishers

Drawing on her family's own experiences and those of other parents facing the death of a child from illness or a life-limiting condition, Sacha Langton-Gilks explains the challenges, planning, and conversations that can be expected during this traumatic period. Practical advice such as how to work with the healthcare professionals, drawing up an Advance Care Plan, and how to move care into the home sit alongside tender observations of how such things worked in her own family's story. The book also includes a template person-centred planning document, developed by experts in the field. Empowering and reassuring, this book will help families plan and ensure the best possible end-of-life care for a child or young person. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Ben's stem cell transplant. A children’s guide to donor (allogeneic) stem cell transplant'

Ben's stem cell transplant. A children’s guide to donor (allogeneic) stem cell transplant (June 2017)

Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group

This illustrated booklet is for children who need a stem cell transplant. Using the story of Ben it explains what stem cells are, what the treatment involves, what happens in hospital and going home.

Cover image of 'Handling animals and pets. Information for parents and carers of children and young people undergoing treatment for cancer'

Handling animals and pets. Information for parents and carers of children and young people undergoing treatment for cancer (September 2017)

Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group

Guidance on keeping pets when a child has cancer. Covers issues such as general hygiene, pets to avoid, feeding, bedding and litter trays, pet vaccines and veterinary care, and first aid if a child is bitten by a pet.

Cover image of 'Will and Sophie have radiotherapy. A children's guide to radiotherapy'

Will and Sophie have radiotherapy. A children's guide to radiotherapy (March 2017)

Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group

Illustrated, colour booklet for children following the story of Will, who has radiotherapy to his brain, and Sophie, who has radiotherapy to her stomach.

Cover image of 'Ruby's stem cell harvest and transplant. A children's guide to stem cell harvesting and transplant using their own stem cells (autologous transplant)'

Ruby's stem cell harvest and transplant. A children's guide to stem cell harvesting and transplant using their own stem cells (autologous transplant) (October 2017)

Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group

An illustrated, colour booklet for children who are having a stem cell transplant. It describes the bone marrow, the stem cell nurses, the harvest machine, and what happens on the day that the cells are harvested and on the day that they are returned.

Cover image of 'Keeping active during and after treatment. A parent’s guide to physical activity, sport and exercise for children and young people with cancer'

Keeping active during and after treatment. A parent’s guide to physical activity, sport and exercise for children and young people with cancer (October 2017)

Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group

This booklet is for parents of children and young people with cancer. It gives practical advice that may help when thinking about activity levels both during and after treatment.

Cover image of 'Total body irradiation (TBI)'

Total body irradiation (TBI) (August 2017)

Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group

This factsheet is written for young people with cancer, or parents of a child with cancer, who are receiving total body irradiation (TBI), as part of their conditioning therapy for a stem cell transplant (SCT). It explains TBI, including where you will have your radiotherapy, how the radiotherapy will be given and the side effects that may happen. 

Cover image of 'Veno-occlusive disease (VOD)'

Veno-occlusive disease (VOD) (August 2017)

Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group

Veno-occlusive disease (VOD) is one of the less common but serious complications that can occur during stem cell transplant (SCT). VOD is a complication that affects the liver. This factsheet has been produced to help you understand more about VOD. It explains what VOD is and why it happens, how it is diagnosed, its impact, and how it is treated.

Cover image of 'Graft versus host disease (GvHD)'

Graft versus host disease (GvHD) (August 2017)

Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group

Graft versus host disease (GvHD) is a complication of donor (allogeneic) stem cell transplantation (SCT), in which the cells from the stem cell donor (graft) react to the cells in the patient (host). This factsheet has been written to help you to understand how GvHD may affect you/your child and what possible treatments there are. The factsheet will complement the information given by the nurses and doctors who make up your stem cell transplant (SCT) team. They will be able to give you information specific to you, and will always be very happy to answer any questions you might have.

Cover image of 'Langerhan's cell histiocytosis (LCH)'

Langerhan's cell histiocytosis (LCH) (August 2017)

Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group

Written to accompany 'Children and young people with cancer: A parent's guide', this factsheet explains what Langerhan's cell histiocytosis is, and briefly describes the signs, symptoms, tests and treatment.

Cover image of 'My child has a brain or spinal tumour. A guide for parents and carers'

My child has a brain or spinal tumour. A guide for parents and carers (January 2017)

Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group

This booklet has detailed information for parents whose child has a brain or spinal tumour. It covers the typical signs and symptoms, diagnosis, the treatment options, clinical trials, supportive care during treatment, and ongoing needs after therapy. Appendices include the structure and function of the brain, a glossary of terms, support groups and useful sources of information.

Cover image of 'Liver tumours'

Liver tumours (July 2017)

Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group

Written to accompany 'Children and young people with cancer: A parent's guide', this factsheet explains what liver tumours are, and describes the signs, symptoms, tests and treatment options.

Cover image of 'Young person's guide to lymphoma'

Young person's guide to lymphoma (January 2017)

Lymphoma Association

Comprehensive booklet for young people with lymphoma. 

Cover image of 'My child has finished treatment. What happens next? A guide to follow-up and adjusting to normal life for
parents and carers whose child or teenager has finished treatment for cancer'

My child has finished treatment. What happens next? A guide to follow-up and adjusting to normal life for parents and carers whose child or teenager has finished treatment for cancer (July 2017)

Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group

This booklet for the parents and carers of children with cancer aims to help answer some of the many questions that arise when treatment finishes. It discusses feelings and emotions, practical issues, school, and moving on.

Cover image of 'Brain tumours'

Brain tumours (June 2017)

Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group

Written to accompany 'Children and young people with cancer: A parent's guide', this factsheet explains what a brain tumour is, and describes the signs and symptoms, tests and treatment options.

Cover image of 'Taking part in clinical trials. Information for parents and carers of a child or young person with cancer'

Taking part in clinical trials. Information for parents and carers of a child or young person with cancer (August 2017)

Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group

Many children and young people with cancer are treated on clinical trials. This booklet, designed for parents and carers of children and young people with cancer, aims to help you to understand more about clinical trials and answer some of the questions you may have.

Cover image of 'Joe has leukaemia'

Joe has leukaemia (March 2017)

CLIC Sargent

Joe is diagnosed with leukaemia in his first year at school. This illustrated, colour storybook describes what happens when Joe has to go into hospital for tests. The story follows Joe from first feeling ill, through diagnosis and treatment, to recovery and returning to normal life.

Cover image of 'Complementary and natural therapies for your child. Information for parents and families of a child or young person with cancer'

Complementary and natural therapies for your child. Information for parents and families of a child or young person with cancer (September 2017)

Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group

This leaflet is for parents who are interested in finding out more about how complementary and natural therapies can help their child to cope with the side-effects of cancer and its treatment.

Cover image of 'When your child’s cancer comes back or does not respond to initial treatment. Information for parents and families of a child or young person with relapsed or refractory cancer'

When your child’s cancer comes back or does not respond to initial treatment. Information for parents and families of a child or young person with relapsed or refractory cancer (October 2017)

Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group

Being told your child’s cancer has come back or hasn’t gone away can come as a huge shock, bringing back many emotions from your child’s first diagnosis. This booklet acknowledges these feelings and gives information to help you cope with the experience once again. 

Cover image of 'Mary has a brain tumour'

Mary has a brain tumour (September 2017)

CLIC Sargent

Mary is five years old when she is diagnosed with a brain tumour. This illustrated, colour storybook describes what happens when she has to go to the hospital for tests and treatment. The story follows Mary from first feeling ill, through diagnosis and treatment, to recovery and return to normal life.

Cover image of 'Family history, genes and breast cancer'

Family history, genes and breast cancer (March 2017)

Breast Cancer Care

This booklet explains what a family history of breast cancer is, and what this may mean for you or your family.

Cover image of 'Lucy has a tumour'

Lucy has a tumour (September 2017)

CLIC Sargent

Lucy is five years old when she is diagnosed with cancer. This illustrated, colour storybook describes what happens when she has to go to the hospital for tests and treatment. The story follows Lucy from first feeling ill, through diagnosis and treatment, to recovery and returning to normal life.

Cover image of 'A young person's guide to to the stem cell transplant journey'

A young person's guide to to the stem cell transplant journey (June 2017)

Anthony Nolan

This booklet has been designed to provide teenagers and young adults with the information and support needed at every stage of the stem cell transplant journey. It will cover all aspects, from how a donor is found, right the way through to coping with long term side effects and helping you return to education or work.

Cover image of 'Fertility. Support for young people affected by cancer'

Fertility. Support for young people affected by cancer (July 2017)

Macmillan Cancer Support

This booklet is for teenagers and young adults who have, or have had, cancer and who are worried about effects on their fertility.

Cover image of 'Answering your questions about your friend's illness. Factsheet for children and young people'

Answering your questions about your friend's illness. Factsheet for children and young people (November 2017)

CLIC Sargent

This factsheet for children and young people aged 13 and over who have a friend with cancer addresses common concerns about cancer and its treatment. Now included in the "Cancer and school life" pack and can be downloaded as part of the pack.

Cover image of 'Lucy has a tumour [Welsh]'

Lucy has a tumour [Welsh] (March 2017)

CLIC Sargent

Lucy is five years old when she is diagnosed with cancer. This illustrated, colour storybook describes what happens when she has to go to the hospital for tests and treatment. The story follows Lucy from first feeling ill, through diagnosis and treatment, to recovery and returning to normal life.

Cover image of 'Joe has leukaemia [Welsh]'

Joe has leukaemia [Welsh] (March 2017)

CLIC Sargent

Joe is diagnosed with leukaemia in his first year at school. This illustrated, colour storybook describes what happens when Joe has to go into hospital for tests. The story follows Joe from first feeling ill, through diagnosis and treatment, to recovery and returning to normal life.

Cover image of 'Mary has a brain tumour [Welsh]'

Mary has a brain tumour [Welsh] (March 2017)

CLIC Sargent

Mary is five years old when she is diagnosed with a brain tumour. This illustrated, colour storybook describes what happens when she has to go to the hospital for tests and treatment. The story follows Mary from first feeling ill, through diagnosis and treatment, to recovery and return to normal life.

Cover image of 'Naomi's story. Living with leukaemia'

Naomi's story. Living with leukaemia (2017)

Franklin Watts

This picture book uses the first-person testimony of Naomi, a 10-year-old girl with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. Naomi explains what it was like to find out she had cancer, when she lost all her hair and what it was like spending so much time in hospital. The intimate and direct impact of using Naomi’s real first-person testimony encourages children to empathise with her situation, and to understand how some children’s lives are very different from their own. Naomi talks about school, family, friends and explains the confusion and chaos caused by cancer. This BAFTA award-winning story was originally produced as an animation for the BBC. Aimed at children aged 9 and up. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The little c'

The little c (2017)

Self-published using CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

On a chilly, damp, foggy, September morning, Charlie slowly walks into the downstairs brightly lit florescent kitchen. His eyes react to the light reflecting off the large white cabinets. He touches the tender swollen lump under the left side of his neck and winces in pain. Charlie knows that something is wrong with him. He’s afraid to tell his mom and dad for fear that learning what may be causing the lump in his neck may be related to the sickness he almost died from when he was born. He doesn’t want to put his family through the stress and uncertainty that they went through twelve years ago. But he knows if he doesn’t say something, his parents may never forgive him. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'We own the sky'

We own the sky (2017)

Trapeze (Orion)

Rob Coates can't believe his luck. There is Anna, his incredible wife, and most precious of all, Jack, their son, who makes every day an extraordinary adventure. Rob feels like he's won the lottery of life. Or rather - he did. Until the day it all changes when Anna becomes convinced there is something wrong with Jack. Now Rob sleepwalks through his days, unable to bridge the gulf that separates him from his wife, his son and the business of living. But he's determined to come to terms with what’s happened-and find a way back to life, and forgiveness. We Own the Sky will resonate with anyone who has ever suffered loss or experienced great love. Luke Allnutt shows that the journey from hope to despair and back is never as simple as we think, and that even the most thoroughly broken heart can learn to beat again. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Benny's hat'

Benny's hat (2017)

Pomelo Pip

Benny’s Hat follows Friz’s story from when she first learns of her brother’s illness, right through to his death and beyond. With its realistic but hopeful and gentle tone, readers will see that it is normal to feel a whole range of emotions –sad, worried, confused, angry and happy, even during the darkest of times. (Publisher) 

Cover image of 'My brother or sister has cancer. A children's guide to coping with cancer'

My brother or sister has cancer. A children's guide to coping with cancer (August 2016)

Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group

This illustrated booklet tells the story of siblings Tom and Jess, whose little brother Ben has cancer. It describes how they cope with the illness and the changes it brings. It is aimed at children under nine.

Cover image of 'Helping brothers and sisters. A guide for adults supporting siblings of children with cancer'

Helping brothers and sisters. A guide for adults supporting siblings of children with cancer (February 2016)

Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group

This illustrated leaflet is designed to help adults who come into contact with the siblings of children with cancer. It explains the problems that siblings may have and how adults can best help them cope.

Sorry, no publications found.
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