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The web Directory of Information Materials for People Affected by Cancer is regularly updated and currently has details of over 1,900 booklets, leaflets, books and audiovisual materials for people affected by cancer. Most have been published in the last five years but we have included some older ones that are still useful.

Results: 468

Cover image of 'Fast facts: Multiple myeloma and plasma cell dyscrasias'

Fast facts: Multiple myeloma and plasma cell dyscrasias (2015)

Health Press

Multiple myeloma accounts for approximately 0.8% of cancers worldwide, with about 114 000 new cases each year. Rapid progress is being made in the development of new treatments and, although myeloma is incurable at present, survival has almost tripled over the past 10 years and it is now projected that a third of patients will survive more than 10 years after diagnosis. Fast Facts: Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Dyscrasias emphasizes the importance of early diagnosis for a favourable outcome, covers the ever-increasing role of genetics in diagnosis and treatment, and discusses new and gold-standard treatments. A chapter on supportive care also features and briefs the reader on long-term outcomes and quality of life issues. Although primarily intended for health care professionals, this highly readable resource may be of interest to patients wanting to know more about multiple myeloma and plasma cell dyscrasias. Written for doctors, read by patients too. (Publisher)

Cover image of '100 questions and answers about myelodysplastic syndromes'

100 questions and answers about myelodysplastic syndromes (2015)

Jones and Bartlett Publishers

Newly revised and updated, "100 questions & answers about myelodysplastic syndromes" provides authoritative and practical answers to the most common questions asked by patients and their loved ones. What is myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS)? What causes MDS? Is MDS hereditary, and will I give it to my children? Written by experts in the field, and with commentary from actual patients, this guide is the only text available to provide both the doctor's and patient's views. It is an invaluable resource for anyone struggling with the medical, physical, and emotional turmoil of this disease. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Late fragments'

Late fragments (2015)

William Collins

Ambitious and talented, Kate Gross worked at Number 10 Downing Street for two British Prime Ministers whilst only in her twenties. At thirty, she was CEO of a charity working with fragile democracies in Africa. She had married 'the best looking man I've ever kissed' – and given birth to twin boys in 2008. The future was bright. But aged 34, Kate was diagnosed with advanced colon cancer. After a two-year battle with the disease, Kate died peacefully at home on Christmas morning, just ten minutes before her sons awoke to open their stockings. She began to write as a gift to herself, a reminder that she could create even as her body began to self-destruct. Written for those she loves,her book is not a conventional cancer memoir; nor is it filled with medical jargon or misery. Instead, it is Kate's powerful attempt to make sense of the woman who emerged in the strange, lucid final chunk of her life. Her book aspires to give hope and purpose to the lives of her readers even as her own life drew to its close. Kate should have been granted decades to say all that she says in these pages. Denied the chance to bore her children and grandchildren with stories when she became fat and old, she offers us all instead her thoughts on how to live; on the wonder to be found in the everyday; the importance of friendship and love; what it means to die before your time and how to fill your life with hope and joy even in the face of tragedy. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The little white book. Sheffield and the surrounding area. A directory of resources to help people affected by a brain tumour'

The little white book. Sheffield and the surrounding area. A directory of resources to help people affected by a brain tumour (November 2014)

Brainstrust

A directory of support services and resources for people with a brain tumour in South East Scotland.

Cover image of 'Remembering hare. The great race'

Remembering hare. The great race (2014)

Southgate Publishers

This beautifully illustrated story, written for children aged 5 - 9 years, is about coming to terms with the death of someone special. Featuring the same much-loved characters from "Saying goodbye to hare", Rabbit and Buzzard reflect together on the ups and downs, feelings and experiences of the first year following the death of their dear friend Hare, as they watch the "Great Race". This lovely book is about treasuring memories, creating a legacy and celebrating the life of the person who has died.  Inspired by the author's experience of supporting her young children following the death of their father, this book delivers a hopeful, supportive message for children and adults alike. There are guidance notes included for the adult who is supporting the child; these are aimed at helping further exploration of the questions and feelings children have at this difficult time. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'I love you daddy'

I love you daddy (2014)

Millgate House Publishers

A poignant and true story written from a child's perspective, I Love You Daddy is sensitive and insightful and helps to support the emotional needs of children faced with the pain of losing a loved one to cancer. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Toby the teapot's daddy has a poorly lid'

Toby the teapot's daddy has a poorly lid (2014)

Paula and Richard Middleton

A short story for children that uses accessible characters to help explain to a child about a parent being diagnosed with a brain tumour. It follows Toby the teapot's daddy through the journey of the first signs and symptoms, diagnosis and treatment.

Cover image of 'The memory tree'

The memory tree (2014)

Orchard Books

Fox has lived a long and happy life in the forest. One day, he lies down in his favourite clearing, takes a deep breath, and falls asleep for ever. Before long, Fox's friends begin to gather in the clearing. One by one, they tell stories of the special moments that they shared with Fox. And, as they share their memories, a tree begins to grow, becoming bigger and stronger, sheltering and protecting all the animals in the forest, just as Fox did when he was alive. This gentle and comforting tale celebrates life and the memories that are left behind when a loved one dies. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'What does super Jonny do when mum gets sick?'

What does super Jonny do when mum gets sick? (2014)

Books For Caring Kids

Jonny is a little superhero with a BIG problem. His Mum is sick. How can he help? Join Super Jonny and Bear, as they go to the hospital to investigate. LEARN who the staff working in the hospital are and what they do. DISCOVER Jonny's secret weapon. Super Jonny is recommended by teachers for teachers. The question page links to the English and New Zealand national curriculums. These questions teach the children how to help the sick. Some people need regular hospital care to manage their disease. These people have their own page entitled: Preparing for a hospital admission: 5 tips for chronically ill moms. This ensures that any mother who is going into hospital, has some supplies when her children visit. This list of simple suggestions could also be filled by any adult wanting to help a Mom who is suddenly sick. With its big bold professionally drawn illustrations, Super Jonny is a valuable resource for your family, school or medical centre. (Publisher).

Cover image of 'Goodbye grandma'

Goodbye grandma (2014)

Walker Books

When a little boy is told that his grandma has died, he isn't really sure what death means. In this reassuring lift-the-flap book with bold and colourful illustrations, he asks his mum important questions about death and bereavement. Why do people have to die? What happens to them once they are dead? What can he do to remember his grandma? Through this gentle dialogue between parent and child, Melanie Walsh sensitively explores the issues surrounding death and bereavement from a child's perspective. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'A room full of chocolate. A story of friendship, family and pot-bellied pigs'

A room full of chocolate. A story of friendship, family and pot-bellied pigs (2014)

Hodder Children's Books

Grace's fun-loving Mum has found a lump. Her north London world of sleepovers, tap dancing and playing the clarinet fall apart when she is sent to live with her grumpy old granddad on his farm in Yorkshire while her mother goes into hospital to get better. Grace misses her mother so much it hurts, and doesn't quite understand what is happening to her. And things go from bad to worse when she starts school and becomes the bullies' latest target. But Grace is no longer alone when she meets Rainbow Girl Megan and her pig, Claude - when she's with them she feels as if she can confront anything. At Easter time when Grace misses her mum the most, she knows she must find a way to get to London. With Megan's help, she hatches a plan to run away that involves Claude, chocolate Easter eggs and a risky ID swap. But it's all worth it if it means that she finally gets to see her mum ...(Publisher)

Cover image of 'POG. Weathering the storm'

POG. Weathering the storm (2014)

Mereo Books

When Samantha received the devastating news that she had a cancer that was difficult to treat - in fact, the treatment itself might be fatal - she had to make some difficult choices about how to try and survive. Her story is full of pain, laughter and hope. Surrounded by her young children and supported by her husband, stepson, close family and friends, Samantha was able to overcome her illness through a mixture of conventional and unconventional treatments, some large leaps of faith and some very fortunate timing. She believes that with a combination of meditation and Eastern medicines she was able to put off further chemotherapies until Western science procured an answer. POG is a big thank-you letter to those who helped her on her journey. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Colour me in'

Colour me in (2014)

Self-published using CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

Lori fills every piece of paper in the house with tropical scenes, covers her head and face with flowers and even paints a sea-scape on her mother-in-law's dining room walls. Life-affirming and uplifting, Colour Me In is a story of serious illness, the edges of sanity and the transforming power of art. It's about what can happen when crisis strikes and the life you have carefully stitched together comes apart at the seams. When all the relationships you treasure - with your partner, your children, your friends - are challenged. Lori finally connects with the one person who knows her most intimately, someone she has almost forgotten - herself. Through art, friends and a journey of discovery, Lori finds her way to healing a life which has been cruelly interrupted, to make something new, whole, better and as wonderful as her paintings. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'When dad died'

When dad died (2014)

Books Beyond Words

When Dad Died takes a gentle, honest and straightforward approach to death and grief in the family. The pictures tell the story of the death of a parent in a simple but moving way. The approach is non-denominational. When Dad Died illustrates a burial, while When Mum Died shows a cremation. The greatly expanded text in these third editions includes information on how people are likely to react when someone is very ill and to their death. It explores difficult emotions, possible physical feelings and behaviour changes. Guidance is given on how to relate to a bereaved person and how to answer the questions ‘How do we feel when someone dies?’, ‘What happens after someone dies?’ and ‘How long does it take to get back to normal?’. There is advice for support staff and carers of those with learning disabilities (including how to formulate guidelines and a sample bereavement questionnaire), plus information on useful written resources and bereavement organisations that can offer further help. These books will be helpful to adolescents and adults with learning disabilities as well as for their carers and supporters. In addition, children without learning disabilities will appreciate these books as they adopt a more direct approach to death than is usual. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'When mum died'

When mum died (2014)

Books Beyond Words

When Mum Died and When Dad Died take a gentle, honest and straightforward approach to death and grief in the family. The pictures tell the story of the death of a parent in a simple but moving way. The approach is non-denominational. When Dad Died illustrates a burial, while When Mum Died shows a cremation. The greatly expanded text in these third editions includes information on how people are likely to react when someone is very ill and to their death. It explores difficult emotions, possible physical feelings and behaviour changes. Guidance is given on how to relate to a bereaved person and how to answer the questions ‘How do we feel when someone dies?’, ‘What happens after someone dies?’ and ‘How long does it take to get back to normal?’. There is advice for support staff and carers of those with learning disabilities (including how to formulate guidelines and a sample bereavement questionnaire), plus information on useful written resources and bereavement organisations that can offer further help. These books will be helpful to adolescents and adults with learning disabilities as well as for their carers and supporters. In addition, children without learning disabilities will appreciate these books as they adopt a more direct approach to death than is usual. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Kelsey and the yellow kite'

Kelsey and the yellow kite (September 2013)

Myeloma UK

Kelsey's dad has been diagnosed with myeloma. This booklet describes what myeloma is, how it may be treated and how the illness affects the patient and the family.

Cover image of 'The paper dolls'

The paper dolls (2013)

Macmillan Children’s Books

A string of paper dolls goes on a fantastical adventure through the house and out into the garden. They soon escape the clutches of the toy dinosaur and the snapping jaws of the oven-glove crocodile, but then a very real pair of scissors threatens. The Paper Dolls is a stunning, rhythmical story of childhood, memory and the power of imagination from the author of The Gruffalo, and illustrating talent Rebecca Cobb. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Eek! My mummy has breast cancer'

Eek! My mummy has breast cancer (2013)

Club Books

When my mum was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2012 it literally rocked my world, the world of my family, and the world of our friends. I searched everywhere looking for information about breast cancer that teenagers could understand and relate to - I couldn't find any. I decided if I couldn't find any books about breast cancer that I, as a teenager, could understand, I would have to write my own book from my experience on dealing with a loved one who has been diagnosed with cancer and in the hope others could find useful that I struggled to find originally. This is what I put together and for all teenagers and young people out there I hope you find this book useful, helpful and most of all: comforting. Emma Sutherland. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Who will cut the grass?'

Who will cut the grass? (2013)

Cancer Focus Northern Ireland

This illustrated book for young children aims to help them understand and prepare for the death of a parent or significant adult.

Cover image of 'The cancer that wouldn't go away: a story for kids about metastatic cancer'

The cancer that wouldn't go away: a story for kids about metastatic cancer (2013)

Lulu.com

The cancer that wouldn't go away is a groundbreaking book, written especially for the child whose parent is living with metastatic cancer. This sensitively written tale uses a gentle, yet realistic approach to help children ages 4-8 face the unique uncertainties of life with incurable cancer. Unlike stories about early-stage cancer, after which the parent is cured and life goes back to normal, for the family in this story, life has irrevocably changed. The future is uncertain. But love and laughter remain constant, as they take life one day at a time. Includes a comprehensive guide ("How to use this book") for parents and professionals, written by child trauma psychologist. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Always and forever'

Always and forever (2013)

Picture Corgi

When Fox dies the rest of his family are absolutely distraught. How will Mole, Otter and Hare go on without their beloved friend? But, months later, Squirrel reminds them all of how funny Fox used to be, and they realise that Fox is still there in their hearts and memories. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'My parent has cancer and it really sucks. Real-life advice from real-life teens'

My parent has cancer and it really sucks. Real-life advice from real-life teens (2013)

Sourcebooks Fire

A book especially for the most forgotten family member when cancer strikes a parent: teens It s estimated that one million teens have a parent or close relative with cancer -- and it really sucks. Which is why father-daughter team Mark and Maya Silver, who was a teenager when her mother was diagnosed with cancer, have written a book of advice and support specifically for the underserved teenage audience. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Suzie goes to a funeral'

Suzie goes to a funeral (2013)

The Choir Press

Join Suzie as she goes to Grandma's funeral and says goodbye. Suzie can help explain to a child who may be anxious about going to a funeral for the first time. A simple story to help and show what they might experience on this sad day. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Mum's way'

Mum's way (2013)

Simon & Schuster UK

Angie and Ian were childhood sweethearts, Angie adored kids and, as one of eight children himself, Ian was only too happy to have as many as they could. After their marriage they had three sons in quick succession. But then, aged just thirty one, Angie was diagnosed with breast cancer and the couple had to accept they might not be able to have any more. Five years on, though, with Angie well again they went on to have five more. But in 2007, Angie had a shadow on her lung and it was the return of the original breast cancer she thought she had beaten. It seemed the disease had returned to tear their world apart again. Though Ian searched tirelessly for cures, Angie practised acceptance. She wouldn't live to see her children grow up. Raising eight children would be a big job for any couple; to raise them alone, without their mother, an almost Herculean feat. But this was exactly what Angie wanted Ian to be able to do. So in the last months of her life, Angie compiled a list of 'rules' to guide Ian in the future, and put him on an intensive training course, so he could learn all the skills he would need. She taught him how to make her special chicken curry, how to soothe away their hurts, pack their lunchboxes with all their favourites and do all the little things she'd done for them so unthinkingly. And Ian knew he wasn't just doing this for the children. He was doing it so his beloved wife could be comforted by knowing that he had the tools to bring their children up her way. Finally, inevitably, came the hardest task of all. Angie, the job done, had to find the courage to let them go, and Ian and the children the courage to carry on without her. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Emotional support through breast cancer. The alternative handbook'

Emotional support through breast cancer. The alternative handbook (2013)

Radcliffe Publishing

This compassionate guide presents an array of new perspectives on the emotional effects of breast cancer and includes many personal testimonies from women who have been diagnosed with this disease. Written by a breast cancer survivor and practising psychologist, it shares practical ideas to help support sufferers at all stages, be it at diagnosis, during treatment or during life after the initial treatments are over. The concise, easy-to-read format includes exercises to develop an acceptance of thoughts and feelings, whilst the individual accounts validate the multitude of emotions felt by sufferers. It is a must for all breast cancer patients and sufferers, their families and friends. Its real-life approach, using first hand accounts, is also highly recommended for all health and social care professionals wanting a fresh approach to managing the emotional impacts of breast cancer. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'You just don't understand. Supporting bereaved teenagers'

You just don't understand. Supporting bereaved teenagers (April 2013)

Winston's Wish

The transition from childhood to adulthood can be a challenging process at the best of times. This booklet aims to help you understand what is normal adolescent development, and to recognise the additional problems teenagers may face if someone important dies during these years. This booklet is based on many years' experience of working with bereaved teenagers, families and professionals who support them and the information here will help you to consider how to respond to the individual needs of a bereaved teenager.

Cover image of 'George the Sun Safe Superstar!'

George the Sun Safe Superstar! (2012)

FastPrint Publishing|SKCIN: The Karen Clifford Skin Cancer Charity

This is a story of how a boy became known by a very, very special name. How he spread a message, near and far, and became a Sun Safe Superstar. Helping children learn about the importance of sun safety in a fun and engaging way. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'What does dead mean? A book for young children to help explain death and dying'

What does dead mean? A book for young children to help explain death and dying (2012)

Jessica Kingsley Publishers

What Does Dead Mean? is a beautifully illustrated book that guides children gently through 17 of the 'big' questions they often ask about death and dying. Questions such as 'Is being dead like sleeping?', 'Why do people have to die?' and 'Where do dead people go?' are answered simply, truthfully and clearly to help adults explain to children what happens when someone dies. Prompts encourage children to explore the concepts by talking about, drawing or painting what they think or feel about the questions and answers. Suitable for children aged 4+, this is an ideal book for parents and carers to read with their children, as well as teachers, therapists and counsellors working with young children. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The copper tree'

The copper tree (2012)

Strauss House Productions

When Olivia's teacher, Miss Evans, dies, the children at her school are encouraged to think of everything that reminds them of her. Written with touching sensitivity and sprinkled with light-hearted moments, 'The Copper Tree' is about love and legacy and will help children understand that, while sadness is an inevitable part of grief, death is not the end... for what we leave behind can be everlasting. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Saying goodbye to hare'

Saying goodbye to hare (2012)

Southgate Publishers

This is an uplifting story written for children aged 5-9 years about death and dying. Beautifully illustrated, Saying Goodbye to Hare is full of honesty and warmth. As young Rabbit witnesses the life, illness and death of his dear friend Hare, the story explores some of the feelings and questions children have at this time. Inspired by the author's own personal experience of supporting her young children through the illness and death of their father, the story is sensitively written to give a positive, thoughtful message about death and dying. The book includes guidance notes for the adult supporting the child. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Missing mummy'

Missing mummy (2012)

Macmillan Children's Books

Written and illustrated by the talented and award-winning author-illustrator Rebecca Cobb, this extraordinary book deals with the loss of a parent from a child's point of view. Perfectly pitched text and evocative artwork explore the many emotions a bereaved child may experience, from anger to guilt and from sadness to bewilderment. And importantly, the book also focuses on the positive - the recognition that the child is still part of a family, and that his memories of his mother are to be treasured. Beautifully illustrated with moments of wonderful warmth and the gentlest humour, Missing Mummy is a touching, honest and helpful book that approaches a difficult subject with great integrity. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'My father’s arms are a boat'

My father’s arms are a boat (2012)

Enchanted Lion Books

It's quieter than it's ever been. Unable to sleep, a young boy climbs into his father's arms. Feeling the warmth and closeness of his father, he begins to ask questions about the birds, the foxes, and whether his mom will ever wake up. They go outside under the starry sky. Loss and love are as present as the white spruces, while the father's clear answers and assurances calm his worried son. Here we feel the cycles of life and life's continuity, even in the face of absence and loss, so strongly and clearly that we know at the end that everything will, somehow, be all right. (Publisher) 

Cover image of 'Love, Lucie X'

Love, Lucie X (2012)

Simon & Schuster

Lucie is the middle child in a family that has been devastated by the death of her mother. Struggling to cope without Mum to guide them, Lucie, her brother Hugo, big sister Chloe and Dad are dealing with the emotional fallout of losing someone so close, as well as the practical realities of death. As she tries to cope with her grief, Lucie starts to write letters to her mum and as she writes begins to feel that maybe, just maybe, her mum is still around watching over all of them. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'A monster calls'

A monster calls (2012)

Walker Books

The monster showed up after midnight. As they do. But it isn't the monster Conor's been expecting. He’s been expecting the one from his nightmare, the one he’s had nearly every night since his mother started her treatments, the one with the darkness and the wind and the screaming. This monster is something different. Something ancient, something wild. And it wants the most dangerous thing of all from Conor. It wants the truth. Patrick Ness spins a tale from the final idea of Siobhan Dowd, whose premature death from cancer prevented her from writing it herself. Darkly mischievous and painfully funny, 'A Monster Calls' is an extraordinarily moving novel of coming to terms with loss from two of our finest writers for young adults. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The life and death of an unknown celebrity'

The life and death of an unknown celebrity (2012)

Janus Publishing Company Ltd

There was less of her now, but I loved her more. In this raw personal account of tragedy told from a male perspective, the author shares with us what must be one of the most devastating things in anyone’s life when he loses his wife and the mother of his two young children to breast cancer. Darren then has to face telling his children that their mother is never coming back as he learns to adjust to his new life and shake hands with his sorrow. To watch a loved one deteriorate so quickly is very disturbing. To stand by feeling helpless as the cancer spreads through the body, causing it to die, is heartbreaking. Shoe obsessions, screaming, sympathy sex and Starbucks were all part of his journey of self-pity as he loses himself in idle distractions. Through this honest account, Darren shows us that there is hope, once the searing pain of grief has subsided and memories of a past become subdued as he is set on the path to acceptance and happiness. A world without love is a lonely place, so it is comforting to know that love can blossom again - even after the worst and longest winter (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Supporting bereaved children: a guide for parents and carers'

Supporting bereaved children: a guide for parents and carers (2011)

Cruse Bereavement Care

A booklet for adults caring for a bereaved child, whether a parent, family member or professional carer. This short booklet describes and seeks to explain some of the ways in which bereavement can affect children's behaviours, and the support they may find most helpful. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Artichoke hearts'

Artichoke hearts (2011)

Macmillan Children's Books

Twelve-year-old Mira comes from a chaotic, artistic and outspoken family where it’s not always easy to be heard. As her beloved Nana Josie's health declines, Mira begins to discover the secrets of those around her, and also starts to keep some of her own. She is drawn to mysterious Jide, a boy who is clearly hiding a troubled past and has grown hardened layers - like those of an artichoke - around his heart. As Mira is experiencing grief for the first time, she is also discovering the wondrous and often mystical world around her. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Chocolate chipped. A smelly book about grief'

Chocolate chipped. A smelly book about grief (2011)

Grief Encounter Project

Chocolate Chipped tells the unique story of a young boy named Charlie and his grieving over his Dad’s death. Using real smells and Scratch & Sniff in the pages to help evoke memories, this book explores the sensitive subject of grief in an honest, engaging – and sometimes even humorous – way. Chocolate Chipped can help adults to talk openly to children about the loss of a loved one. It can be read by bereaved children to help them understand their own feelings and by other children to help them appreciate what a friend might be going through. Teachers, educational specialists as well as Bereavement Counsellors would also gain from using this book. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Saying goodbye. Helping families deal with pre- and post-bereavement'

Saying goodbye. Helping families deal with pre- and post-bereavement (2011)

Southgate Publishers Ltd

Offers in-depth advice and guidance for adults about how to help children and young people deal with an expected death in the family. The book includes detailed sections on telling the children, questions children may ask, ways to encourage communication between adults and children, creating lasting memories together and dealing with death. The book will be of great help to adults going through this most difficult and painful time, It will also be a useful resource for professionals working with pre- and post-bereaved families. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Milo and the restart button'

Milo and the restart button (2011)

Simon and Schuster

Starting over is like pressing the reset button on a game that makes you lose all your points and wipes out any of the good stuff you've spent hundreds of hours learning...Surviving the year is all Milo has to do. Start to finish in one whole piece...But it's not just a new school he's dealing with; it's a new house, a new neighbourhood - a whole new life. And it's one without his mum in it. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Enjoy every sandwich. Living each day as if it were your last'

Enjoy every sandwich. Living each day as if it were your last (2011)

Bantam Press (imprint of Transworld Publications)

As medical director of the famed Preventive Medicine Research Institute, Lee Lipsenthal helped thousands of patients struggling with disease to overcome their fears of pain and death and to embrace a more joyful way of living. In his own life, happily married and the proud father of two remarkable children, Lee was similarly committed to living his life fully and gratefully each day. The power of those beliefs were tested in July 2009, when he was diagnosed with esophageal cancer, leaving him with a 90 percent chance of dying within five years. As Lee and his wife, Kathy, navigated his diagnosis, illness, and treatment, he discovered that he did not fear death, and that even as he was facing his own mortality, he felt more fully alive than ever before. In the tradition of Don't Sweat the Small Stuff, Tuesdays with Morrie and The Last Lecture, Enjoy Every Sandwich distils everything Lee learned about how we find meaning, purpose, and peace in our lives. Told with humour and heart, this deeply inspiring book will help readers embrace their humanity, accept uncertainty, and live a life of gratitude - whether they are facing the end now or not. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Who will do my hair?'

Who will do my hair? (2010)

Ulster Cancer Foundation

This illustrated book for young children aims to help them understand and prepare for the death of a parent or significant adult.

Cover image of 'The heart and the bottle'

The heart and the bottle (2010)

HarperCollins Children's Books

Award-winning picture book star Oliver Jeffers explores themes of love and loss in this life-affirming and uplifting tale. Once there was a girl whose life was filled with wonder at the world around her…Then one day something happened that made the girl take her heart and put it in a safe place. However, after that it seemed that the world was emptier than before. But would she know how to get her heart back? In this deeply moving story, Oliver Jeffers deals with the weighty themes of love and loss with an extraordinary lightness of touch and shows us, ultimately, that there is always hope. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'A child's grief. Supporting a child when someone in the family has died'

A child's grief. Supporting a child when someone in the family has died (November 2010)

Winston's Wish

This booklet covers a variety of issues that may affect a child when a person close to them dies, both immediately and in the longer term. It has practical suggestions and ideas for activities to do together with a child and includes a section on suggested further reading and where to find additional support.

Cover image of 'I miss you. A first look at death'

I miss you. A first look at death (2009)

Wayland Books

This reassuring picture book explores the difficult issue of death for young children. Children's feelings and questions about this sensitive subject are looked at in a simple but realistic way. This book helps them to understand their loss and come to terms with it. Written by a trained psychotherapist, journalist and parent, and illustrated by an experienced children's book artist, this is part of an acclaimed and successful series of picture-book non-fiction for Early Years. Books in the series give advice and promote interaction between children, parents, and teachers on a wide variety of personal, social and emotional issues. They are excellent tools for teachers to use during classroom discussions. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Remembering...'

Remembering... (2009)

Child Bereavement Charity

A memory/keepsake book for bereaved children for when someone special in their life has died, illustrated with watercolours by Daniel Postgate and written by Dianne Leutner. "Remembering" is a beautiful memory/keepsake book for children when someone special in their life has died. The outstanding illustrations by award-winning Daniel Postgate are light-hearted yet thoughtful. It's part book, part scrapbook, and was created to hellp keep a child's memories alive after the loss of someone special and to give children a place to return to whenever they wish. For ages 10 and under. This book received a 'Highly Commended' BMA Patient Information award. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Her mother's face'

Her mother's face (2009)

Scholastic Children’s Books

Siobhan can remember the way her mother joked. And she can just about feel her mother's hands, lifting her up. But she can't remember her mother's face any more. Then one day, a mysterious woman appears and tells Siobhan a secret, something that will bring back all that's been forgotten... (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The secret C: straight talking about cancer'

The secret C: straight talking about cancer (2009)

Winston's Wish

When a family member has cancer it is hard for everyone to understand. It can be particularly difficult when a parent or carer faces the challenge of trying to explain to their child what cancer means and how it may affect their family. This booklet is aimed at supporting parents or carers with this task, and encourages open communication and questions about cancer within the family. Through pictures, captions and straightforward language, it explains how tumours are formed, what the various treatments are and how these may affect the person with cancer. It stresses the need to keep to family routines and, importantly, to still try and have fun. It is aimed at children aged 7-10 and will work best when an adult is present to expand on the simple messages in the text. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Saving my arse. A story of cancers, colons and Singapore noodles'

Saving my arse. A story of cancers, colons and Singapore noodles (2008)

Mark Davies

If you or a family member or friend is diagnosed with Bowel/colon cancer then this book will hopefully be of some use and comfort. But I really wrote this book for all of those people, who thought like me that cancer and its treatments begins and ends with losing your hair and sitting around in hospitals like a displaced Hare Krishna convention, whilst having an uncontrollable urge to run the marathon. I want to allay, if at all possible, some the fears that we all have of cancer without boring anyone to tears or being over emotional. More people than ever are surviving, and go on to live a normal life. I am not a doctor, nor have I ever had any medical training, so I found that I didn't really understand a lot of what was being talked about by the doctors. Questions like: What is Chemotherapy and what does it do? What happens during Radiotherapy? (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Life on the refrigerator door'

Life on the refrigerator door (2008)

Macmillan Children's Books

Mom, I went to the store. See inside the fridge. I watered the plants. I cleaned out Peter's cage. I tidied the sitting room. And the kitchen. And I did the washing up. I'm going to bed. Your live-in servant, Claire. 'Life on the Refrigerator Door' is told exclusively through notes exchanged by Claire and her mother, Elizabeth, during the course of a life-altering year. Their story builds to an emotional crescendo when Elizabeth is diagnosed with breast cancer. Stunningly sad but ultimately uplifting, this is a clever, moving, and original portrait of the relationship between a daughter and mother. It is about how we live our lives constantly rushing, and never making time for those we love. It is also an elegy to how much can be said in so few words, if only we made the time to say them. (Publisher)

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