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The web Directory of Information Materials for People Affected by Cancer is regularly updated and currently has details of over 1,900 booklets, leaflets, books and audiovisual materials for people affected by cancer. Most have been published in the last five years but we have included some older ones that are still useful.

Results: 458

Cover image of 'My daddy is my superhero'

My daddy is my superhero (2018)

North Staffordshire Press

My Daddy Is My Superhero was inspired by Michaelagh's own experience of explaining her husband's brain tumour illness to her eldest son, and is intended to help begin conversations surrounding serious illness and death with young children. At its core, My Daddy Is My Superhero is about the loving relationship between a little boy and his dad. It is a story about love, fun, beauty, loss, sadness, memories and celebration. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Before I go. The essential guide to creating a good end of life plan'

Before I go. The essential guide to creating a good end of life plan (2018)

Findhorn Press

A compassionate, practical guide to end-of-life matters, empowering us to clarify and share our wishes and continue to live life to the fullest. Many people say “I wish I had known what they wanted” when their loved one has died. Too often, a person’s wishes for end-of-life care, and for after they have gone, have not been recorded. With this valuable guide, you can now begin to do this for yourself, so your relatives will be able to honor your wishes more easily, saving them unnecessary stress and upset at a potentially intense time. Before I Go addresses the emotional, spiritual, and practical aspects of end-of-life planning to help you make well-informed decisions about your end-of-life care and prepare well for your death. Jane Duncan Rogers guides you with equanimity, care, and humor through subjects such as how to have a conversation about dying, the impact of grief on relatives responsible for estate matters, DIY funerals and what that entails. She states clearly what you need to have in place to ensure the best end of life possible, helps you identify your values and beliefs in this area, and demonstrates which actions you then need to take, and when. With a full resource pack of essential information available to you, including guiding questions, exercises, and recording tools, as well as downloadable worksheets and supportive online courses, decision-making will be much easier and you will find relief and peace of mind knowing you have taken care of outstanding matters. You will also be giving a great gift to your loved ones. When they have this information in advance, you spare them many difficult decisions and administrative hassle at a time when they will be grieving and not in a fit state to cope. It can bring great comfort to those left behind to know they are indeed carrying out your wishes. It also provides an opportunity for you to record your achievements and history, giving them a legacy they would otherwise not have. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Thyroid cancer. For patients, by patients'

Thyroid cancer. For patients, by patients (2017)

British Thyroid Foundation

This booklet provides information about the different types of thyroid cancer, and the causes, symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment options. It includes quotes from people who have had thyroid cancer, answers to frequently asked questions, a glossary, and a checklist for use during treatment.

Cover image of 'Why mum? A small child dealing with a big problem'

Why mum? A small child dealing with a big problem (2005)

Veritas

'Why Mum?' is a children's picture book exploring the serious illness of parent through the eyes of seven-year-old Matthew. It works chronologically through the illness and deals with the different feelings and questions the child experiences as they arise. It also shows how life changes for him and the family and how he adapts to this. Beautifully illustrated by the author's son, this book is about one mother's illness and her family’s experience. It would be useful in any situation where a serious illness affects family life and especially where young children have to deal with difficult situations. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Understanding locally advanced prostate cancer'

Understanding locally advanced prostate cancer (May 2018)

Macmillan Cancer Support

This booklet is for anyone who has been diagnosed with locally advanced prostate cancer. This is when prostate cancer has grown outside the prostate and may have started to spread into tissue or organs close by. There is also information for family members and friends. The booklet explains the different treatments for locally advanced prostate cancer and their side effects. It also has information about the feelings you might experience, and how your relationships, work and finances might be affected.

Cover image of 'Missing mummy'

Missing mummy (2012)

Macmillan Children's Books

Written and illustrated by the talented and award-winning author-illustrator Rebecca Cobb, this extraordinary book deals with the loss of a parent from a child's point of view. Perfectly pitched text and evocative artwork explore the many emotions a bereaved child may experience, from anger to guilt and from sadness to bewilderment. And importantly, the book also focuses on the positive - the recognition that the child is still part of a family, and that his memories of his mother are to be treasured. Beautifully illustrated with moments of wonderful warmth and the gentlest humour, Missing Mummy is a touching, honest and helpful book that approaches a difficult subject with great integrity. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The way we die now'

The way we die now (2016)

Head of Zeus

We have lost the ability to deal with death. Most of our friends and beloved relations will die in a busy hospital in the care of strangers, doctors and nurses they have known at best for a couple of weeks. They may not even know they are dying, victims of the kindly lie that there is still hope. They are unlikely to see even their family doctor in their final hours, robbed of their dignity and fed through a tube after a long series of excessive and hopeless medical interventions. This is the starting point of Seamus O'Mahony's thoughtful, moving and unforgettable book on the western way of death. Dying has never been more public, with celebrities writing detailed memoirs of their illness, but in private we have done our best to banish all thought of dying and made a good death increasingly difficult to achieve. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'What is cancer? A book for kids'

What is cancer? A book for kids (2016)

Self-published using CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

It is very difficult for a family to explain to a child what cancer is when a loved one has been diagnosed. This book explains to children what cancer is. 

Cover image of 'A moment of grace. A story of love and loss'

A moment of grace. A story of love and loss (2018)

Ebury Press (Penguin Random House)

Patrick Dillon and Nicola Thorold were together for twenty-eight years. Patrick was an award-winning architect and writer and Nicola a leading figure in theatre, awarded an OBE for her contribution to the arts at London’s Roundhouse. Their two children were almost grown-up. Life was good. And then, in May 2015, Nicola was diagnosed with leukaemia. After several rounds of treatment, a bone marrow transplant and many waves of recovery and decline, she died thirteen months after her diagnosis. Six months later, at Christmas, Patrick started to write. A Moment of Grace is the searing, tender account of Patrick’s life with Nicola and her illness, and his life after her loss. But it is more than a story of illness and unbearable grief: it is a book of memory, of home, of family. It is a tale of the transfiguring power of love. Heartbreaking, life-affirming and truly unforgettable, A Moment of Grace is one man’s journey to find life after his wife’s death. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The day the sea went out and never came back'

The day the sea went out and never came back (2003)

Speechmark Publishing Ltd

"The day the sea went out and never came back" is a story for children who have lost someone they love. Eric is a sand dragon who loves the sea very much. Each day, he watches it going out and coming back. His sea is beautiful indeed to him. But one day, the sea goes out and does not come back. Eric waits and waits, but it does not come back. So he falls on the sand in terrible pain. It feels to him as if he has lost everything. After many bleak days, Eric sees a little wild flower. It is dying. Eric knows he must save it. He finds water. More and more flowers appear and so Eric starts to make a beautiful rock pool garden. And as he does, he finds the courage to feel the full pain of his loss, instead of closing his heart. He realises that his memories of his precious sea are like a special kind of treasure in his mind, a treasure he will never lose. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Only one of me. A love letter from dad'

Only one of me. A love letter from dad (2018)

Graffeg Limited

There's only one dad quite like me. I wish that there were two. I'd have more time to spend And I would spend it all with you. Most of us can't imagine having the time we spend with our children or loved ones cut short, but this is the reality being faced by mother of two Lisa Wells, who was diagnosed with terminal bowel and liver cancer in December 2017, at the age of 31. The Only One of Me project grew from Lisa's determination to leave a lasting legacy for her daughters and her desire to help other families rally against the difficulties of loss. Only One of Me is the product of Lisa's lifelong love of writing and a newfound friendship with award-winning children's author Michelle Robinson. The two collaborated on this tender and moving rhyming poem, with charming illustrations by Tim Budgen, which is both a love letter to Lisa's own daughters and a testament to the unwavering strength of parental love, a timeless message for families facing the challenges of bereavement. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Milly's bug-nut'

Milly's bug-nut (2002)

Winston's Wish

Milly's Bug Nut is the story of a family finding their way through bereavement and of Milly who finds an unexpected answer to her heart's desire. Jill Janney, the author of Milly's Bug Nut, wrote this story for her own children after the death of their father.

Cover image of 'Fast facts: Multiple myeloma and plasma cell dyscrasias'

Fast facts: Multiple myeloma and plasma cell dyscrasias (2015)

Health Press

Multiple myeloma accounts for approximately 0.8% of cancers worldwide, with about 114 000 new cases each year. Rapid progress is being made in the development of new treatments and, although myeloma is incurable at present, survival has almost tripled over the past 10 years and it is now projected that a third of patients will survive more than 10 years after diagnosis. Fast Facts: Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Dyscrasias emphasizes the importance of early diagnosis for a favourable outcome, covers the ever-increasing role of genetics in diagnosis and treatment, and discusses new and gold-standard treatments. A chapter on supportive care also features and briefs the reader on long-term outcomes and quality of life issues. Although primarily intended for health care professionals, this highly readable resource may be of interest to patients wanting to know more about multiple myeloma and plasma cell dyscrasias. Written for doctors, read by patients too. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The heart and the bottle'

The heart and the bottle (2010)

HarperCollins Children's Books

Award-winning picture book star Oliver Jeffers explores themes of love and loss in this life-affirming and uplifting tale. Once there was a girl whose life was filled with wonder at the world around her…Then one day something happened that made the girl take her heart and put it in a safe place. However, after that it seemed that the world was emptier than before. But would she know how to get her heart back? In this deeply moving story, Oliver Jeffers deals with the weighty themes of love and loss with an extraordinary lightness of touch and shows us, ultimately, that there is always hope. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Signs and symptoms of cancer [Punjabi]'

Signs and symptoms of cancer [Punjabi] (March 2017)

Macmillan Cancer Support

This z-card gives the signs and symptoms of the main cancers for men and women and advice on cancer prevention for anyone worried about their cancer risk.

Cover image of 'Suzie goes to a funeral'

Suzie goes to a funeral (2013)

The Choir Press

Join Suzie as she goes to Grandma's funeral and says goodbye. Suzie can help explain to a child who may be anxious about going to a funeral for the first time. A simple story to help and show what they might experience on this sad day. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The best medicine'

The best medicine (2016)

Little Island Books

Philip is twelve years old and life is pretty good. He gets on with his mum and gets by pretty well at school - in spite of girl problems, teacher problems, bully problems and - er - poetry problems. Philip's happy-go-lucky life is disrupted when his mother gets breast cancer. Bad enough that your mother is seriously ill - but could she not have developed a less embarrassing kind of cancer - toe cancer, maybe, or ear cancer? Philip's attempts to cope with his situation are both hilarious and touching. Through it all, he's writing letters to his hero, the comedian Harry Hill, looking for advice. A hilarious take on the unfunny subject of cancer; this book brings one of modern life's most prevalent illnesses into the light and gives it a human face. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'When dinosaurs die. A guide to understanding death'

When dinosaurs die. A guide to understanding death (1998)

Little Brown and Company

No one can really understand death but to children, the passing away of a loved one can be especially perplexing and troublesome. This is true whether the loss is a classmate, friend, family member or pet. Here to offer advice and reassurance are some very wise dinosaurs. This succinct and thorough guide helps dispel the mystery and negative connotations associated with death, providing answers to some of the most-often asked questions and also explores the feelings we may have regarding the death of a loved one and the ways to remember someone after he or she has died. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Michael Rosen's sad book'

Michael Rosen's sad book (2004)

Walker Books

Very occasionally the term non-fiction has to stretch itself to accommodate a book that fits into no category at all. Michael Rosen's Sad Book is such a book. It chronicles Michael's grief at the death of his son Eddie from meningitis at the age of 19. A moving combination of sincerity and simplicity, it acknowledges that sadness is not always avoidable or reasonable and perfects the art of making complicated feelings plain. It wasn't made like any other book either; Michael Rosen said of the text, "I wrote it at a moment of extreme feeling and it went straight down onto the page ... Quentin didn't illustrate it, he 'realised' it. He turned the text into a book and as a result showed me back to myself. No writer could ask and get more than that." And Quentin Blake says that the picture of Michael "being sad but trying to look happy" is the most difficult drawing he's ever done... "a moving experience." (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The enduring melody'

The enduring melody (2006)

Darton, Longman and Todd

A moving and tender meditation on loving, living and dying by one of the greatest Anglican spiritual writers. Michael Mayne, author of three of the best-selling spirituality titles of recent years, Learning to Dance, Pray, Love, Remember, and A Year Lost And Found, set out to complete a final book that would tackle the linked questions of what is the solid ground of a belief which for him has proved authentic and survived into old age, and how ageing may affect us physically, mentally and spiritually. On completing it, he discovered that he was suffering from cancer of the jaw, and in a nine-month journal he reflects (among much else) on whether his faith stands firm, and where God may be found in the challenging country of cancer. The Enduring Melody is a moving and tender meditation on loving, living and dying by one of the greatest living Anglican spiritual writers. Michael Mayne is the former head of religious programmes at the BBC and Dean Emeritus of Westminster. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'A place in my heart'

A place in my heart (2007)

QED Publishing

Andrew’s grandad has died, and Andrew is feeling very sad and confused. Explore with your child the difficult issue of bereavement as Andrew talks about his feelings with his mum and dad. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'As big as it gets. Supporting a child when a parent is seriously ill'

As big as it gets. Supporting a child when a parent is seriously ill (2007)

Winston's Wish

This booklet aims to help families cope with the serious illness of a parent or child. It provides a range of ideas for parents or carers so that they may feel more able to explain to their children what is happening. The booklet also includes some suggestions about what parents might say to children and how to offer support.

Cover image of 'Two weeks with the Queen'

Two weeks with the Queen (1999)

Puffin

Colin Mudford is on a quest. His brother Luke has cancer and the doctors in Australia don't seem able to cure him. Sent to London to stay with his Aunty Iris, Colin reckons it's up to him to find the best doctor in the world - and he starts by asking none other than the Queen to help... (This edition aimed at children 8-12 years old, there is another edition for younger children.) (Publisher) Also available as an audiotape.

Cover image of 'My daddy had cancer'

My daddy had cancer (2015)

Self-published using CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

A gentle caring book about a boy, Bertie, whose daddy dies from cancer. This book is for use by a parent, grandparent, teacher or counsellor or anyone who is caring for a child during a difficult time. This book is not intended for a child to read alone, but in a loving nurturing environment to enable the child to share their thoughts and feelings about their loss. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Mum has cancer'

Mum has cancer (2012)

CLAN (Cancer Link Aberdeen and North)

This book is about the impact that the diagnosis of a mother's cancer can have on a young child's life. It is a starting point for discussion, giving the adult a way to ask about the child's own experience of a difficult situation.

Cover image of 'Early childhood lymphoedema'

Early childhood lymphoedema (February 2016)

Lymphoedema Support Network

Lymphoedema in children may occur in the treatment of cancer following surgery or radiotherapy. This leaflet describes what lymphoedema is, why it has developed, the treatment options and the impact on daily life.

Cover image of 'Chocolate chipped. A smelly book about grief'

Chocolate chipped. A smelly book about grief (2011)

Grief Encounter Project

Chocolate Chipped tells the unique story of a young boy named Charlie and his grieving over his Dad’s death. Using real smells and Scratch & Sniff in the pages to help evoke memories, this book explores the sensitive subject of grief in an honest, engaging – and sometimes even humorous – way. Chocolate Chipped can help adults to talk openly to children about the loss of a loved one. It can be read by bereaved children to help them understand their own feelings and by other children to help them appreciate what a friend might be going through. Teachers, educational specialists as well as Bereavement Counsellors would also gain from using this book. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Mummy’s got a poorly'

Mummy’s got a poorly (2017)

Sarah West

Mummy’s Got a Poorly is an engaging, thought-provoking story, told through the eyes of a five-year-old girl whose mummy is unwell. It is aimed at the young children of parents with a serious illness to support them through a difficult time. Whilst not mentioning the ‘C’ word it does cover the effects that medicine such as chemotherapy can have and also provides lots of opportunities for children to ask questions and discuss their feelings about their own parent’s illness. (Publisher) 

Cover image of 'Smiling in the darkness'

Smiling in the darkness (2012)

The Memoir Club

Smiling in the Darkness is the story of the persevering spirit of a woman in her courageous struggle against cancer. Isobel Bradley's journey is one that will inspire us all to appreciate and embrace the greatest gift of all, the gift of life. Isobel was first diagnosed with the life threatening disease when she was 28 years old; over a decade later her past traumas have returned to haunt her. In this powerful story, Isobel's determination shines through as she succeeds in living her life to the full. Marked by near death experiences, we read about her journey, ranging from skiing and white water rafting incidents through to major life saving surgery. Unable to have children herself, Isobel supports a Cambodian orphanage and regularly visits the children there. She explains how she found the strength to keep her latest cancer diagnosis a secret from her family for three months as she travelled around the other side of the world. Isobel’s story is a true ray of sunshine in a world where so many are struggling in the darkness. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Her mother's face'

Her mother's face (2009)

Scholastic Children’s Books

Siobhan can remember the way her mother joked. And she can just about feel her mother's hands, lifting her up. But she can't remember her mother's face any more. Then one day, a mysterious woman appears and tells Siobhan a secret, something that will bring back all that's been forgotten... (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Milkshakes and morphine. A memoir of love and loss'

Milkshakes and morphine. A memoir of love and loss (2018)

Square Peg (Vintage)

This is a singular memoir: an excavation of mother love, a candid account of the agonies, and absurdities, of the cancer experience, and a doggedly optimistic paean to life. When Genevieve Fox finds a lump in her throat, she turns up for the hospital diagnosis in a party frock and fancy hair. I can’t have cancer, she thinks. I’ve done my hair. But there is another reason she can’t countenance cancer. Genevieve was orphaned to it at the age of nine. Genevieve’s story weaves together past and present as she recalls her rackety, unconventional childhood, while also facing the spectre of being lost to her young boys. Yet, she confronts her treatment with the same sassy survival instinct that characterised her childhood misadventures. Through an extraordinary alchemy, Genevieve takes life’s precariousness and turns it on its head. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'If all the world were…'

If all the world were… (2018)

Frances Lincoln Children’s Books

A moving, lyrical picture book about a young girl's love for her granddad and how she copes when he dies, written by poet and playwright Joseph Coelho. This beautifully illustrated, powerful and ultimately uplifting text is the ideal way to introduce children to the concept of death and dying, particularly children who have lost a grandparent. (Publisher) 

Cover image of 'When dad died'

When dad died (2014)

Books Beyond Words

When Dad Died takes a gentle, honest and straightforward approach to death and grief in the family. The pictures tell the story of the death of a parent in a simple but moving way. The approach is non-denominational. When Dad Died illustrates a burial, while When Mum Died shows a cremation. The greatly expanded text in these third editions includes information on how people are likely to react when someone is very ill and to their death. It explores difficult emotions, possible physical feelings and behaviour changes. Guidance is given on how to relate to a bereaved person and how to answer the questions ‘How do we feel when someone dies?’, ‘What happens after someone dies?’ and ‘How long does it take to get back to normal?’. There is advice for support staff and carers of those with learning disabilities (including how to formulate guidelines and a sample bereavement questionnaire), plus information on useful written resources and bereavement organisations that can offer further help. These books will be helpful to adolescents and adults with learning disabilities as well as for their carers and supporters. In addition, children without learning disabilities will appreciate these books as they adopt a more direct approach to death than is usual. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'When mum died'

When mum died (2014)

Books Beyond Words

When Mum Died and When Dad Died take a gentle, honest and straightforward approach to death and grief in the family. The pictures tell the story of the death of a parent in a simple but moving way. The approach is non-denominational. When Dad Died illustrates a burial, while When Mum Died shows a cremation. The greatly expanded text in these third editions includes information on how people are likely to react when someone is very ill and to their death. It explores difficult emotions, possible physical feelings and behaviour changes. Guidance is given on how to relate to a bereaved person and how to answer the questions ‘How do we feel when someone dies?’, ‘What happens after someone dies?’ and ‘How long does it take to get back to normal?’. There is advice for support staff and carers of those with learning disabilities (including how to formulate guidelines and a sample bereavement questionnaire), plus information on useful written resources and bereavement organisations that can offer further help. These books will be helpful to adolescents and adults with learning disabilities as well as for their carers and supporters. In addition, children without learning disabilities will appreciate these books as they adopt a more direct approach to death than is usual. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'C. Because cowards get cancer too...'

C. Because cowards get cancer too... (1999)

Vermilion (Random House)

Shortly before his 44th birthday, John Diamond received a call from the doctor who had removed a lump from his neck. Having been assured for the previous two years that this was a benign cyst, Diamond was told that it was, in fact, cancerous. Suddenly, this man who'd until this point been one of the world's greatest hypochondriacs, was genuinely faced with mortality. And what he saw scared the wits out of him. Out of necessity, he wrote about his feelings in his TIMES column and the response was staggering. Mailbag followed Diamond's story of life with, and without, a lump - the humiliations, the ridiculous bits, the funny bits, the tearful bits. It's compelling, profound, and witty. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Living with the long-term effects of cancer. Acknowledging trauma and other emotional challenges'

Living with the long-term effects of cancer. Acknowledging trauma and other emotional challenges (2020)

Jessica Kingsley Publishers

Challenging a number of myths about living long term with or after cancer, this book offers new insights by delving into areas that are not usually spoken about. Written from a dual perspective- that of a psychologist who had breast cancer and who copes with the long-term effects of treatment - the book contests the assumption that the afflicted person will simply 'get better' or 'move through' to a better situation. Emotional and physical side-effects can worsen over time and people living beyond or with cancer often endure a mismatch between expectations and reality, because they have been told that life would be easier than it actually is. This can leave both those suffering longer term and those close to them confused and unprepared. Including testimonies with people who have had a cancer diagnosis and people in the medical profession, the book signposts ways that professionals may help and offers prompts for friends and relatives to have useful and open conversations with the person affected. It gives voice to many people who feel that their suffering is disputed and diminished by the prevailing narrative around recovery. Galgut includes discussion on relationships, work, trauma, fear of recurrence and the role of therapy. Giving an unflinchingly honest perspective, Living with the Long-Term Effects of Cancer sheds light on these struggles, in the belief that bringing this conversation to the forefront is key to improving life for those who are affected by cancer and who suffer longer term from its effects. (Pub;lisher)

Cover image of 'My father’s arms are a boat'

My father’s arms are a boat (2012)

Enchanted Lion Books

It's quieter than it's ever been. Unable to sleep, a young boy climbs into his father's arms. Feeling the warmth and closeness of his father, he begins to ask questions about the birds, the foxes, and whether his mom will ever wake up. They go outside under the starry sky. Loss and love are as present as the white spruces, while the father's clear answers and assurances calm his worried son. Here we feel the cycles of life and life's continuity, even in the face of absence and loss, so strongly and clearly that we know at the end that everything will, somehow, be all right. (Publisher) 

Cover image of 'Goodbye Daisy'

Goodbye Daisy (2018)

Hashtag Press

Elsie and Daisy are best friends. They go to a special school, a school where the children have helpers and some of the children use wheels to get around. Elsie waits at the classroom door for her best friend to arrive every day. One day Daisy doesn’t arrive in school. All the grown-ups are crying; they are sad because Daisy has died. Elsie will never see her friend again. Elsie isn’t sad though, she is cross with her friend for not saying goodbye. Goodbye Daisy is based on Stephanie Nimmo’s own experiences of explaining to her daughter Daisy’s friends that Daisy had died. Aimed mainly at children with profound learning disabilities it is also a heart-warming social story and support guide about the death of a school friend that will support help parents, carers and professionals support a child through their loss and grief. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Activity book'

Activity book (2018)

BUPA

An activity booklet to help occupy children at home or in hospital when someone they know has cancer.

Cover image of 'The grandad grand prix'

The grandad grand prix (2017)

North Staffordshire Press

Flo has two of the most fun and competitive grandads in the world who can never resist the chance to get one over on the other. That is until Flo is faced with some devastating news when one of her grandads is diagnosed with a serious illness. Although her world is turned upside down, Flo continues to be inspired by her grandad whose sheer will, determination and positive attitude will not be diminished no matter what. So join Flo as she embarks on an emotional roller coaster as she laughs, cries, makes new friends and discovers what it truly means to never, ever give up. The Grandad Grand Prix is a fictional story inspired by true events and a must read for all age groups. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Mum's way'

Mum's way (2013)

Simon & Schuster UK

Angie and Ian were childhood sweethearts, Angie adored kids and, as one of eight children himself, Ian was only too happy to have as many as they could. After their marriage they had three sons in quick succession. But then, aged just thirty one, Angie was diagnosed with breast cancer and the couple had to accept they might not be able to have any more. Five years on, though, with Angie well again they went on to have five more. But in 2007, Angie had a shadow on her lung and it was the return of the original breast cancer she thought she had beaten. It seemed the disease had returned to tear their world apart again. Though Ian searched tirelessly for cures, Angie practised acceptance. She wouldn't live to see her children grow up. Raising eight children would be a big job for any couple; to raise them alone, without their mother, an almost Herculean feat. But this was exactly what Angie wanted Ian to be able to do. So in the last months of her life, Angie compiled a list of 'rules' to guide Ian in the future, and put him on an intensive training course, so he could learn all the skills he would need. She taught him how to make her special chicken curry, how to soothe away their hurts, pack their lunchboxes with all their favourites and do all the little things she'd done for them so unthinkingly. And Ian knew he wasn't just doing this for the children. He was doing it so his beloved wife could be comforted by knowing that he had the tools to bring their children up her way. Finally, inevitably, came the hardest task of all. Angie, the job done, had to find the courage to let them go, and Ian and the children the courage to carry on without her. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'A child's grief. Supporting a child when someone in the family has died'

A child's grief. Supporting a child when someone in the family has died (November 2010)

Winston's Wish

This booklet covers a variety of issues that may affect a child when a person close to them dies, both immediately and in the longer term. It has practical suggestions and ideas for activities to do together with a child and includes a section on suggested further reading and where to find additional support.

Cover image of 'Big tree is sick'

Big tree is sick (2017)

Jessica Kingsley Publishers

Snibbles and Big Tree are best friends! They have always hung out together, and Snibbles loves Big Tree very much. When Big Tree unexpectedly falls ill with woodworm, Snibbles is very upset and angry. The illness is a very bad one and Big Tree does not feel well and doesn't want to play for a long time. Poor Snibbles! He wants Big Tree to get better, but he feels as if there is nothing he can do. What can Snibbles and his friends do to help Big Tree through his treatment and recovery? This beautifully illustrated storybook describes the anger and emotion that many children encounter when a close relative or friend is diagnosed with a long-term illness, such as cancer. The story of Big Tree depicts how things are often out of your control and sets out effective strategies for dealing with these emotions. This story features loveable characters and vivid illustrations, as well as activities for children aged 5+ to complete with their parents or professionals in times of illness and loss. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Only one of me. A love letter from mum'

Only one of me. A love letter from mum (2018)

Graffeg Limited

'There's only one mum quite like me. I wish that there were two. I'd have more time to spend And I would spend it all with you.' Most of us can't imagine having the time we spend with our children or loved ones cut short, but this is the reality being faced by mother of two Lisa Wells, who was diagnosed with terminal bowel and liver cancer in December 2017 at the age of 31. The Only One of Me project grew from Lisa's determination to leave a lasting legacy for her daughters and her desire to help other families rally against the difficulties of loss. Only One of Me is the product of Lisa's lifelong love of writing and a newfound friendship with award-winning children's author Michelle Robinson. The two collaborated on this tender and moving rhyming poem, with charming illustrations by Catalina Echeverri, which is both a love letter to Lisa's own daughters and a testament to the unwavering strength of parental love, a timeless message for families facing the challenges of bereavement. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Enjoy every sandwich. Living each day as if it were your last'

Enjoy every sandwich. Living each day as if it were your last (2011)

Bantam Press (imprint of Transworld Publications)

As medical director of the famed Preventive Medicine Research Institute, Lee Lipsenthal helped thousands of patients struggling with disease to overcome their fears of pain and death and to embrace a more joyful way of living. In his own life, happily married and the proud father of two remarkable children, Lee was similarly committed to living his life fully and gratefully each day. The power of those beliefs were tested in July 2009, when he was diagnosed with esophageal cancer, leaving him with a 90 percent chance of dying within five years. As Lee and his wife, Kathy, navigated his diagnosis, illness, and treatment, he discovered that he did not fear death, and that even as he was facing his own mortality, he felt more fully alive than ever before. In the tradition of Don't Sweat the Small Stuff, Tuesdays with Morrie and The Last Lecture, Enjoy Every Sandwich distils everything Lee learned about how we find meaning, purpose, and peace in our lives. Told with humour and heart, this deeply inspiring book will help readers embrace their humanity, accept uncertainty, and live a life of gratitude - whether they are facing the end now or not. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'A room full of chocolate. A story of friendship, family and pot-bellied pigs'

A room full of chocolate. A story of friendship, family and pot-bellied pigs (2014)

Hodder Children's Books

Grace's fun-loving Mum has found a lump. Her north London world of sleepovers, tap dancing and playing the clarinet fall apart when she is sent to live with her grumpy old granddad on his farm in Yorkshire while her mother goes into hospital to get better. Grace misses her mother so much it hurts, and doesn't quite understand what is happening to her. And things go from bad to worse when she starts school and becomes the bullies' latest target. But Grace is no longer alone when she meets Rainbow Girl Megan and her pig, Claude - when she's with them she feels as if she can confront anything. At Easter time when Grace misses her mum the most, she knows she must find a way to get to London. With Megan's help, she hatches a plan to run away that involves Claude, chocolate Easter eggs and a risky ID swap. But it's all worth it if it means that she finally gets to see her mum ...(Publisher)

Cover image of 'Getting on with cancer'

Getting on with cancer (2002)

Books Beyond Words

"Books beyond words" is a series of picture books that has been developed for people who have difficulty reading and who can understand pictures better than words, and to enable discussion about difficult topics. Supporting text and guidelines are also provided for carers, supporters and professionals. When Veronica's doctor told her she had cancer, she was confused and terrified. Then he told her some cancers can be cured. `Getting on with cancer' tells the story of Veronica, a woman with Down's Syndrome, who has cancer. She has surgery and also radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The book deals honestly with the unpleasant side of treatment. It is designed to be used as a counselling tool by anyone working with people who have both learning disabilities and cancer. It will also be valuable for other client groups, for example, people with chronic mental health problems. The book ends on a positive note. Included in the book is Veronica Donaghey's story 'It's not all bad news', written in her own words. There are also guidelines for carers/supporters and for healthcare professionals, and information on relevant resources and helpful organisations. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Water bugs and dragonflies'

Water bugs and dragonflies (1997)

The Pilgrim Press

Talking to children about death can be hard, but it doesn't need to be. Water Bugs and Dragonflies: Explaining Death to Young Children can help you to answer their questions. Doris Stickney tells the story of a small colony of water bugs living happily below the surface of a very quiet pond. Every so often one of them climbs up a lily stalk and disappears from sight, never to return. Those left behind are faced with the mystery of what has become of them. The answer to death lies in the questioning. Stickney invites you and your children into the question. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Glioblastoma. A guide for patients and loved ones. Your guide to glioblastoma and anaplastic astrocytoma brain tumours'

Glioblastoma. A guide for patients and loved ones. Your guide to glioblastoma and anaplastic astrocytoma brain tumours (2017)

ngo media

Glioblastoma and anaplastic astrocytoma are two of the most common form of brain tumours in adults. Too often they can be life changing, even life limiting for patients, wreaking devastation on their families. This readable, moving and non-technical guide is your comprehensive patient focused guide to these obstinate brain cancers. It covers everything from getting an accurate diagnosis, to dealing with the physical, mental and emotional impact of the disease. From treatment options and how to cope with their side effects, to newly developing techniques and future research. This book presents an honest and realistic picture, with a personal approach. Featuring dozens of personal testimonies from those with these high-grade brain tumours and their loved ones, the book offers information, reassurance and support on these, the most complex of brain tumours. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Remembering hare. The great race'

Remembering hare. The great race (2014)

Southgate Publishers

This beautifully illustrated story, written for children aged 5 - 9 years, is about coming to terms with the death of someone special. Featuring the same much-loved characters from "Saying goodbye to hare", Rabbit and Buzzard reflect together on the ups and downs, feelings and experiences of the first year following the death of their dear friend Hare, as they watch the "Great Race". This lovely book is about treasuring memories, creating a legacy and celebrating the life of the person who has died.  Inspired by the author's experience of supporting her young children following the death of their father, this book delivers a hopeful, supportive message for children and adults alike. There are guidance notes included for the adult who is supporting the child; these are aimed at helping further exploration of the questions and feelings children have at this difficult time. (Publisher)

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