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The web Directory of Information Materials for People Affected by Cancer is regularly updated and currently has details of over 1,900 booklets, leaflets, books and audiovisual materials for people affected by cancer. Most have been published in the last five years but we have included some older ones that are still useful.

Results: 466

Cover image of 'Young person's guide to lymphoma'

Young person's guide to lymphoma (January 2020)

Lymphoma Association

Comprehensive booklet for young people with lymphoma. 

Cover image of 'Guide to cancer resources for children and young people'

Guide to cancer resources for children and young people (March 2020)

Macmillan Cancer Support

This list of books, booklets, leaflets, and factsheets for children and young people covers cancer in general, specific cancers, treatments, cancer in others, end of life, and bereavement. It also includes works of fiction that feature cancer. Many of the resources have been reviewed by people affected by cancer and we have linked to the reviews where available.

Cover image of 'Supporting your grandchild and family. An information guide for grandparents of a child or young person diagnosed with cancer'

Supporting your grandchild and family. An information guide for grandparents of a child or young person diagnosed with cancer (April 2019)

Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group

Being told your grandchild has cancer comes as a terrible shock. Most grandparents worry not only about their grandchild, but also about how their own son/daughter will cope. Many are also concerned about the effects a cancer diagnosis will have on other children within the family, how they can support their family and how, as grandparents, they themselves will cope. Sometimes, it is not as easy for grandparents to access information first hand and this can lead to feelings of isolation. This guide answers some of the many questions grandparents might have during diagnosis and treatment.

Cover image of 'I have finished my treatment. What happens next'

I have finished my treatment. What happens next (November 2019)

Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group

This booklet for children and teenagers aged 10-16 aims to help answer questions and concerns that arise when treatment for cancer finishes. It covers feelings and emotions, coping with worry, coping with family and friends, school and college, healthy living, and practical issues such as what happens at follow-up, medicines, and what to look out for.

Cover image of 'Stem cell transplant. A guide to donor (allogeneic) stem cell transplantation for teenagers and young adults'

Stem cell transplant. A guide to donor (allogeneic) stem cell transplantation for teenagers and young adults (February 2019)

Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group

This guide describes stem cells and explains what a stem cell transplantation is, why it might be necessary, and the different types of transplants. It also describes the process of finding a donor, the pre-transplant operation, the transplant team, what to bring to hospital, preparing to receive a bone marrow transplant, what happens during the transplant and afterwards, the side-effects, getting ready to go home and getting back to normal. Includes details of useful organisations and a glossary.

Cover image of 'Donating your stem cells to your brother or sister. A guide to stem cell (bone marrow) donation for teenagers and young adults'

Donating your stem cells to your brother or sister. A guide to stem cell (bone marrow) donation for teenagers and young adults (May 2019)

Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group

Illustrated, colour booklet for children who may be donating bone marrow or stem cells to a sibling. It describes stem cells and stem cell transplants, why a transplant is needed, the types of transplants, the selection process, tissue typing, harvesting the bone marrow (including the risks and side-effects), and what happens if the transplant is unsuccessful. It also covers issues such as consent, what to take into hospital, and changes to sibling relationships. Includes details of useful organisations and a glossary of terms.

Cover image of 'When your brother or sister has cancer. An information guide for teenagers and young adults whose sibling is diagnosed with cancer'

When your brother or sister has cancer. An information guide for teenagers and young adults whose sibling is diagnosed with cancer (November 2019)

Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group

Being told that your brother or sister has cancer can be overwhelming and you may be full of questions. It is a difficult time for everyone in your family as life is turned upside down almost overnight. You will likely feel many different emotions as you try and come to terms with what your sibling’s diagnosis means for you and your family. You may feel worried or upset at this sudden change that you didn’t want or ask for, and you may desperately want everything to go back to normal as it was before their diagnosis. Life can seem very unfair. These feelings are completely normal and you are not alone. This guide covers how your brother or sister’s diagnosis might affect you, your feelings and emotions, and how it is important to take care of yourself during this difficult time. It explains more about cancer, and what you can expect over the coming weeks and months.

Cover image of 'Anna loses her hair. A children’s guide to hair loss as a result of cancer treatment'

Anna loses her hair. A children’s guide to hair loss as a result of cancer treatment (April 2019)

Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group

Hair loss is a common side effect of treatment for childhood cancer, but its impact can be significant. This animation tells the story of Anna, Jack and Laura who all lose their hair while having treatment for cancer and helps young children to understand what might happen.

Cover image of 'Caring for your child at end of life. A guide for parents and carers'

Caring for your child at end of life. A guide for parents and carers (October 2019)

Together for Short Lives

Practical information to support parents and carers at this difficult time. It aims to answer some of the questions that you might have, and sets out what you should expect from children’s palliative care services with useful links to further sources of information and support. Includes reflections from families on their experience of losing a child. 

Cover image of 'Ependymoma (in children). What you need to know'

Ependymoma (in children). What you need to know (July 2019)

The Brain Tumour Charity

This leaflet gives an overview of ependymoma in children and answers questions you may have about this type of tumour.

Cover image of 'Fertility. Support for young people affected by cancer'

Fertility. Support for young people affected by cancer (September 2019)

Macmillan Cancer Support

This booklet is about how cancer and its treatment can affect your fertility. It is for teenagers and young people who need information about this before, during or after cancer treatment, whether you are in a relationship or not and whatever your sexual orientation. It explains how cancer and cancer treatment may affect your fertility and has information about preserving your fertility, having fertility tests, fertility treatments and other options for having a child. It also tells you how to get more support. 

Cover image of 'Symptoms diary'

Symptoms diary (2019)

Headsmart

Brain tumours are relatively rare, but early diagnosis can save lives, which is why keeping track of any potential symptoms can help to make the most out of a doctor’s appointment and may lead to a quicker referral or better reassurance. You can use the diary at your appointment to describe the symptoms and explain your concerns.

Cover image of 'Sex and relationships. Support for young people affected by cancer'

Sex and relationships. Support for young people affected by cancer (May 2019)

Macmillan Cancer Support

This booklet is about cancer, sex and relationships. It is for teenagers and young people who are having or have had cancer treatment. It may also help carers, family members and friends. The booklet explains how cancer and cancer treatment may affect your relationships and sex life. It also gives information about coping with any changes and how to get more support.

Cover image of 'Beyond'

Beyond (2019)

Burning Chair

What happens when we die? Is this really all there is? What exists beyond this life? Alex Duncan is just an ordinary 14 year old boy. His main worries are homework, girls, the school bully......and his sister, Jenna who has ovarian cancer, stage B. As his parents retreat into themselves, Alex is desperate to find a way to help, a way to make things better for his sister. After all, it’s the not knowing that’s the worst thing. Whilst he tries to untangle the ultimate question, life still goes on: his best friend seems oblivious to his feelings about her, the school bully has taken a special interest in him, and everything he does just makes him feel more and more awkward and out of place. Georgia Springate’s debut novel, Beyond, is a funny and touchingly compelling coming-of-age story about love, loss and discovery. Read it and take an emotional journey through one boy’s quest to understand that most tricky of questions: what lies beyond? (Publishers)

Cover image of 'Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). A guide for parents'

Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). A guide for parents (March 2019)

Leukaemia CARE

Being told that your child has acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) can be a shock and very upsetting, particularly when you may never have heard of the disease. This booklet describes childhood ALL, what causes it, who it affects, how it affects your child’s body, what symptoms to expect and likely treatments. It also covers everyday life and childhood ALL and talking about childhood ALL. Includes a glossary of terms and details of useful contacts and further support.

Cover image of 'A story about cancer (with a happy ending)'

A story about cancer (with a happy ending) (2019)

Frances Lincoln Children’s Books

A teenage girl heads towards the hospital waiting room where the doctors are going to tell her how much time she's got to live. As she walks, she thinks about her journey up to this point… the terrible decor in the hospital, wearing a headscarf, the horrible treatments, but also being with her friends, family, and her new boyfriend Victor. This is a story about cancer with a happy ending. It's about life, love, and especially, hope. (Publisher) 

Cover image of 'Abbie has osteosarcoma. A guide for children'

Abbie has osteosarcoma. A guide for children (December 2018)

Bone Cancer Research Trust

Abbie Has Osteosarcoma is written for parents, carers and healthcare professionals to read with children to help them understand about their osteosarcoma and its treatment. 

Cover image of 'Jess's bone marrow donation. A children's guide to bone marrow donation'

Jess's bone marrow donation. A children's guide to bone marrow donation (January 2018)

Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group

A colourful booklet for young children who are preparing to donate bone marrow. It explains what bone marrow is and describes what happens to Jess in hospital before, during and after the operation and when she goes home.

Cover image of 'Searching for information and support online. Help and advice for parents and families of children, teenagers and young adults with cancer'

Searching for information and support online. Help and advice for parents and families of children, teenagers and young adults with cancer (December 2018)

Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group

The huge amount of information online can be overwhelming, and sometimes conflicting, causing even more worry and stress. It is important that parents make sure that health information is filtered and gathered from reliable, easy to understand sources. As a parent or carer of a newly-diagnosed child, you may not feel confident when searching through cancer information. This leaflet offers advice and tips on where to start and what to look for.

Cover image of 'Anna loses her hair. A children’s guide to hair loss as a result of cancer treatment'

Anna loses her hair. A children’s guide to hair loss as a result of cancer treatment (October 2018)

Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group

Hair loss is a common side effect of having chemotherapy and of radiotherapy to the head. This book tells the story of Anna, Jack and Laura who all lose their hair while having treatment for cancer and helps young children to understand what might happen.

Cover image of 'Tom has lymphoma'

Tom has lymphoma (November 2018)

CLIC Sargent|Lymphoma Action

Tom is ten years old when he is diagnosed with lymphoma. This illustrated, colour storybook for parents to read with their children describes what happens when he has to go to the hospital for tests and treatment. The story follows Tom from when he first feels ill, through diagnosis and treatment, to recovery and return to normal life.

Cover image of 'Lymphoma in children'

Lymphoma in children (November 2018)

Lymphoma Action

This factsheet about lymphoma in children (0 to 14 years old) is primarily intended for parents and carers and covers: What is lymphoma?; Types of lymphoma in children; Symptoms; Tests; Outlook; Treatment; Side effects and late effects of treatment; Relapsed and refractory lymphoma; After treatment; Further information and support.

Cover image of 'Peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) harvesting. Information for young people with cancer, and parents of a child or young person with cancer, having a stem cell transplant, and for stem cell donors'

Peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) harvesting. Information for young people with cancer, and parents of a child or young person with cancer, having a stem cell transplant, and for stem cell donors (November 2018)

Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group

This factsheet is written to help explain what is involved when you undergo a peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) harvest. It explains what haematopoietic stem cells are, why they are collected, and what happens before, during and after the harvest.

Cover image of 'Practical advice for parents and carers of children (under 18) with lymphoma'

Practical advice for parents and carers of children (under 18) with lymphoma (November 2018)

Lymphoma Action

This factsheet covers common practical concerns of parents and carers looking after children and young people with lymphoma: When your child is diagnosed; Telling your child; Where your child will be treated; Changes to expect at home; If your child becomes unwell at home; Your child’s diet during treatment; Going back to school; Looking after yourself; Further information and support.

Cover image of 'Helping your child to eat well during cancer treatment. A practical information guide for parents and families of a child or young person with cancer'

Helping your child to eat well during cancer treatment. A practical information guide for parents and families of a child or young person with cancer (October 2018)

Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group

Children with cancer may experience problems with eating and drinking at some stage. This can be due to the cancer or its treatment. This booklet has ideas on helping children with a poor appetite and other eating problems.

Cover image of 'Lymphoma in young people'

Lymphoma in young people (November 2018)

Lymphoma Action

A factsheet for young people up to the age of 24. It covers the different types of lymphoma in young people, their symptoms, the tests needed, treatment options and their possible side effects, and what happens when treatment is finished.

Cover image of 'Practical advice for young people with lymphoma'

Practical advice for young people with lymphoma (November 2018)

Lymphoma Action

Practical advice on issues that often concern teenagers and young adults (up to 24 years old) with lymphoma. It covers: After diagnosis; Where you will be treated; Your medical team; Looking after yourself; School, university and work; Relationships; After treatment.

Cover image of 'Honest answers, sound advice: a young person's guide to cancer'

Honest answers, sound advice: a young person's guide to cancer (2018)

Teenage Cancer Trust

Comprehensive information for young people with cancer.

Cover image of 'Neurosurgery for children with brain tumours'

Neurosurgery for children with brain tumours (February 2018)

The Brain Tumour Charity

This factsheet gives an overview of surgery for brain tumours in children and helps to answer some questions you may have about brain surgery. 

Cover image of 'Steroids for children with brain tumours'

Steroids for children with brain tumours (February 2018)

The Brain Tumour Charity

This factsheet describes when and why children might be given steroids, how they are taken and the possible side-effects, and answers some commonly asked questions that you may have about steroids in children.

Cover image of 'Scans for children with brain tumours'

Scans for children with brain tumours (February 2018)

The Brain Tumour Charity

Information about CT and MRI scans for the parents/carers of a child with a brain tumour, including scan procedure, and how to prepare your child for a scan. It also has answers to some common questions you may have about CT or MRI scans.

Cover image of 'Learning difficulties in children with brain tumours'

Learning difficulties in children with brain tumours (February 2018)

The Brain Tumour Charity

This fact sheet gives an overview of some of the learning difficulties your child may experience as the result of a brain tumour and also of the support and possible plans of action (strategies) available to help them in their learning. 

Cover image of 'Your child's health team (children with a brain tumour)'

Your child's health team (children with a brain tumour) (February 2018)

The Brain Tumour Charity

This factsheet outlines the roles of some of the health care professionals who may be part of a child’s multidisciplinary team.

Cover image of 'Chemotherapy for children with brain tumours'

Chemotherapy for children with brain tumours (February 2018)

The Brain Tumour Charity

This factsheet has information about chemotherapy to treat brain tumours in children. It covers how chemotherapy works, why and how it is given, and preventing infection of your child’s central line and has answers to some common questions.

Cover image of 'Managing your lung cancer diagnosis'

Managing your lung cancer diagnosis (August 2018)

Roy Castle Lung Cancer Foundation

If you or someone you care for has just been diagnosed with lung cancer, then it’s almost certain that you’ll have a lot of questions. We have produced this booklet in partnership with lung cancer experts and people affected by lung cancer to help you make positive informed choices about your care and treatment. 

Cover image of 'Cancer and genetics. How cancer sometimes runs in families'

Cancer and genetics. How cancer sometimes runs in families (September 2018)

Macmillan Cancer Support

This booklet is for people who are worried that cancer might run in the family. It explains how genes work, the role of genes in the development of some cancers, how risk is inherited, and the role of genetic counselling and testing. It also includes information on preventing cancer and the role of genes in specific cancers (bowel, breast, ovarian). Includes details of useful organisations and other resources.

Cover image of 'Tom has lymphoma [Welsh]'

Tom has lymphoma [Welsh] (November 2018)

CLIC Sargent|Lymphoma Action

Tom is ten years old when he is diagnosed with lymphoma. This illustrated, colour storybook for parents to read with their children describes what happens when he has to go to the hospital for tests and treatment. The story follows Tom from when he first feels ill, through diagnosis and treatment, to recovery and return to normal life.

Cover image of 'Head Smart. Early diagnosis of brain tumours'

Head Smart. Early diagnosis of brain tumours (2018)

The Brain Tumour Charity

Leaflet with information about the common symptoms of brain tumours in children and young people and what to do if a child is experiencing any of the symptoms. It also has information about the Headsmart campaign and details of further support.

Cover image of 'In our own words. Parents talk about life after their child has died of cancer'

In our own words. Parents talk about life after their child has died of cancer (January 2018)

CLIC Sargent

This booklet has been written for families whose children have cancer. It includes sections on the circles of grief, changes in grief over time, how relationships are affected, the dual process model of coping with grief, remembering your child, spirituality, and dealing with other people's responses. The text is interspersed with quotes from people whose child has died.

Cover image of 'The cancer guide for young people. What to expect when you're affected by cancer'

The cancer guide for young people. What to expect when you're affected by cancer (February 2018)

Macmillan Cancer Support

A booklet for young people aged 12-25 years. It aims to help answer some of their questions and to provide tips and guidance. It explains what cancer is and how it can be treated. It also gives practical tips about coping with treatment, relationships and sorting out practical things like school, university, work, and money.

Cover image of 'Understanding womb (endometrial) cancer'

Understanding womb (endometrial) cancer (July 2018)

Macmillan Cancer Support

This booklet is about a type of womb cancer called endometrial cancer. It is for anyone who has been diagnosed with this type of cancer. There is also information for carers, family members and friends. The booklet explains how these cancers are diagnosed and treated. It gives information about coping during and after treatment.

Cover image of 'Radiotherapy for children with brain tumours'

Radiotherapy for children with brain tumours (February 2018)

The Brain Tumour Charity

This factsheet has information on radiotherapy in children, the treatment procedure and some of its possible side-effects. 

Cover image of 'Helping your child to eat (children with brain tumours)'

Helping your child to eat (children with brain tumours) (February 2018)

The Brain Tumour Charity

Practical suggestions for parents/carers to helping their child to eat if they have had treatment for a brain tumour.

Cover image of 'Childhood brain tumours'

Childhood brain tumours (February 2018)

The Brain Tumour Charity

This factsheet briefly describes brain tumours in children, the risk factors, diagnosis, treatment options and long-term side effects. It also describes the different types of brain tumours in children.

Cover image of 'Understanding cancer of the ovary, fallopian tube and peritoneum'

Understanding cancer of the ovary, fallopian tube and peritoneum (July 2018)

Macmillan Cancer Support

This booklet is about cancer of the ovary, fallopian tube and peritoneum. It is for anyone who has been diagnosed with one of these types of cancer. There is also information for carers, family members and friends. The booklet explains the signs and symptoms of these cancers, and  how they are diagnosed and treated. It also has information about emotional, practical and financial issues. <!-- ?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" ? -->

Cover image of 'Cancer WTF? Want the facts?'

Cancer WTF? Want the facts? (February 2018)

CLIC Sargent

This booklet, written with the help of young people living with cancer, aims to answers questions that young people with cancer may have. It covers topics such as making sense of it all, hospital life, family and friends, education, work and finances, and sources of support.

Cover image of 'What now? A practical guide for parents and carers'

What now? A practical guide for parents and carers (February 2018)

CLIC Sargent

A booklet for parents of children diagnosed with cancer.

Cover image of 'Childhood acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). A guide for parents'

Childhood acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). A guide for parents (April 2018)

Leukaemia CARE

Being told that your child has acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) can be a shock and very upsetting, particularly when you may never have heard of the disease. This booklet describes childhood AML, what causes it, who it affects, how it affects your child’s body, what symptoms to expect and likely treatments. It also covers everyday life and childhood AML and talking about childhood AML. Includes a glossary of terms and details of useful contacts and further support. 

Cover image of 'Echo's sister'

Echo's sister (2018)

HarperCollins

Twelve-year-old El has planned on making her first week at a new school fantastic. She won’t go by her given name, Laughter. She’ll sit in the back of the classroom where she can make new friends. She won’t even have time to think about all the fun her old friends are having without her. Everything will be great. But when her dad picks her up after school and tells her that her younger sister, Echo, has a life-threatening illness, her world is suddenly turned upside down. And with her parents now pressed for time and money, El feels lost and powerless. Then she befriends Octavius, the only other kid in school who gets what she’s going through. As El begins to adjust to her new life, she soon finds that maybe a little hope and a lot of love can overcome any obstacle. (Publishers)

Cover image of 'Understanding neutropaenia. A colouring book'

Understanding neutropaenia. A colouring book (November 2018)

This illustrated booklet is designed to help children and their parents understand the management of chemotherapy induced neutropaenia. Available only as an interactive book on iTunes and Amazon Kindle, or as a PDF download. Every purchase includes free access to a black-and-white version for children to colour in.  

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