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The web Directory of Information Materials for People Affected by Cancer is regularly updated and currently has details of over 1,900 booklets, leaflets, books and audiovisual materials for people affected by cancer. Most have been published in the last five years but we have included some older ones that are still useful.

Results: 335

Cover image of 'Understanding cancer'

Understanding cancer (2018)

Booklife Publishing

Cancer is a group of diseases in which abnormal cells divide and spread. There are many different kinds of cancer, and different forms of treatment. Cancer is very scary, and can be very difficult to handle physically, emotionally, and mentally. Learning about how cancer affects the body and how it can be treated can help readers who know someone with cancer, or who have cancer themselves. This book can help readers understand complex medical terms and processes through straightforward text. Full-color photographs and fact boxes highlight important information. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Only one of me. A love letter from dad'

Only one of me. A love letter from dad (2018)

Graffeg Limited

There's only one dad quite like me. I wish that there were two. I'd have more time to spend And I would spend it all with you. Most of us can't imagine having the time we spend with our children or loved ones cut short, but this is the reality being faced by mother of two Lisa Wells, who was diagnosed with terminal bowel and liver cancer in December 2017, at the age of 31. The Only One of Me project grew from Lisa's determination to leave a lasting legacy for her daughters and her desire to help other families rally against the difficulties of loss. Only One of Me is the product of Lisa's lifelong love of writing and a newfound friendship with award-winning children's author Michelle Robinson. The two collaborated on this tender and moving rhyming poem, with charming illustrations by Tim Budgen, which is both a love letter to Lisa's own daughters and a testament to the unwavering strength of parental love, a timeless message for families facing the challenges of bereavement. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'What now? A practical guide for parents and carers'

What now? A practical guide for parents and carers (February 2018)

CLIC Sargent

A booklet for parents of children diagnosed with cancer.

Cover image of 'Planning for the final stages of a long-term lung condition'

Planning for the final stages of a long-term lung condition (March 2018)

British Lung Foundation

This information is for people with a long-term lung condition who are coming to the end of their life. It is also for those who are close to them, including their carers, family and friends.

Cover image of 'A new kind of normal'

A new kind of normal (2018)

Self-published

They say there’s a book in all of us, but I doubt I would ever have written one had it not have been for my diagnosis of breast cancer in 2011. ‘A New Kind of Normal' is the story of my life up to and moving on from that moment. Growing up in the 60's, working through the 70's and 80's, juggling a career in TV and radio while bringing up three children and surviving two divorces. From the moment I knew what a bra was, I’d wanted breasts: I even crafted a pair of blue plasticine boobs for myself, as nature made me wait until I was 15 for breasts of my own! Through cancer I lost them both, and with the chemotherapy; all my hair, my fingernails, and more worryingly, a sense of whom I was. My hair grew back, as did my fingernails, but I still struggled with my identity. What I’ve written isn't a diary, nor a self-help guide, and it's not just about cancer. I’ve taken a really good look at the little girl I was and the woman I grew into, and why I went to such lengths to try and claw back some of what cancer had taken from me - it's not everyone's way I appreciate, and it’s been an interesting exercise trying to ascertain why it was mine! I’ve been honest, open, and meticulous when it comes to detail, as I firmly believe that if you take away the mystery, you can take away some of the fear. But there’s a lot to laugh about here too, as luckily I’ve always been able to see the funny side of a situation, preferring that to the occasional overwhelming despair I felt. In this book I've tried to move the disease away from the medical professionals and the hospitals, and to bring it into the day to day, because that's where it sits. Over the last seven years I’ve come to realise that the ripple effect of cancer is far reaching, affecting not just those of us living with it but everyone around us. 'A New Kind of Normal' gives an insight into my relationship with my then partner, now husband; my children and their reaction to my illness, my family and friends, my work colleagues, people who wrote to me, and the professionals who cared for me; everybody reacts differently. Breast cancer assaults your femininity - the treatment is tough and the surgery brutal.  It isn't easy, but it is possible, and I'd like to feel this book may be a source of comfort to anyone who's life is touched by breast cancer; maybe even help them to find their 'New Kind of Normal'. There are many things in life we may have to give up on, but hope is not one of them. (P

Cover image of 'Being Adam Golightly: one man's bumpy voyage to the other side of grief'

Being Adam Golightly: one man's bumpy voyage to the other side of grief (2018)

Short Books

The cruel early death of his wife Helen tears up the script of Adam Golightly's middle-class, middle-aged existence. Miserably single, outnumbered by his kids and haunted by life's screaming fragility, he recounts his fight back against the hand of fate. This irreverent and frank memoir follows Adam's snakes-and-ladders journey through his grief in the year following his wife's death, as he struggles with small town tongue wagging, the trauma of teenage bra shopping and online dating anarchy.Adam's is the biggest mid-life crisis anyone could face and as he starts to build a new, alternative life for himself and his children, he shows not just how to survive bereavement but how to be transformed by it. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Echo's sister'

Echo's sister (2018)

Harper Collins

Twelve-year-old El has planned on making her first week at a new school fantastic. She won’t go by her given name, Laughter. She’ll sit in the back of the classroom where she can make new friends. She won’t even have time to think about all the fun her old friends are having without her. Everything will be great. But when her dad picks her up after school and tells her that her younger sister, Echo, has a life-threatening illness, her world is suddenly turned upside down. And with her parents now pressed for time and money, El feels lost and powerless. Then she befriends Octavius, the only other kid in school who gets what she’s going through. As El begins to adjust to her new life, she soon finds that maybe a little hope and a lot of love can overcome any obstacle. (Publishers)

Cover image of 'The Boobies (and that nasty thing called cancer)'

The Boobies (and that nasty thing called cancer) (2018)

A Spark In The Sand

Ceara Hayden's book The Boobies is a lighthearted and informative story about breast cancer. Her quirky and witty rhymes convey this serious disease in a way that is accessible to young adults and grown-ups alike. Based on her own experience of her mother's diagnosis, Ceara's story brings warmth, hope (and a little humour) for those suffering or watching a loved one suffer from this devastating illness. All profits from this book will be donated to the breast cancer awareness charity CoppaFeel. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'All that followed. A story of cancer, kids and the fear of leaving too soon'

All that followed. A story of cancer, kids and the fear of leaving too soon (2018)

Mirror Books

With four children (three of them triplets!) and a relationship break-up to contend with, some things get a little lost in the mix. Like symptoms. Emma Campbell bravely and honestly offers heartfelt thoughts on what happens when cancer becomes an unwelcome guest at an already crowded party. She shares her own terror and pain, mixed with the heartwarming and unexpected. The extraordinary kindness of people and the gritty detail of battling a life-threatening illness, all while being a single mum to four children. She opens up about her angels and demons, losing and then finding love again, a constant fear of death mixed with the joy and relief of living, the anxiety of cancer returning - then facing it when it does. This book has grown from Emma's blog Me And My Four. Eager to share with her followers in more detail, the secrets, the fears, the triumphs and the terrors that she faces each day, in a life as unpredictable as your own... (Publisher)

Cover image of 'All the time we thought we had'

All the time we thought we had (2018)

Polygon

How do you start a new life when the person you love is about to die? At the age of thirty-six, Gordon Darroch's wife was diagnosed with breast cancer. It was a devastating blow just as he, and their two children with autism, were preparing to move to her native Holland. Eighteen months later, as their plans seemed to be back on course, came the second blow: Magteld was terminally ill and possibly had only a few months to live. As her health rapidly deteriorated, they became caught up in a race against time to get a dying mother home and give their children a future in a country they hardly knew. How could they build a new life in the midst of grief and loss? How would their two sons adjust to such enormous changes? And what would remain of Magteld once she was gone? All the Time We Thought We Had is a story of love and loss and a meditation on grief and memory. It's about how events shape our lives and how we cope with them. And it raises important questions about what we value in life and the legacies we leave behind. (Publisher)

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