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The web Directory of Information Materials for People Affected by Cancer is regularly updated and currently has details of over 1,900 booklets, leaflets, books and audiovisual materials for people affected by cancer. Most have been published in the last five years but we have included some older ones that are still useful.

Results: 1730

Cover image of 'The HPV vaccine for men who have sex with men [Easy read]'

The HPV vaccine for men who have sex with men [Easy read] (2018)

NHS Health Scotland

This leaflet is about the HPV vaccine for men who have sex with men to help protect against four types of HPV that can cause cancer and genital warts.

Cover image of 'Managing the late effects of pelvic radiotherapy in women'

Managing the late effects of pelvic radiotherapy in women (April 2018)

Macmillan Cancer Support

A booklet for women who have had radiotherapy to the pelvic area and who are experiencing late effects. It explains what pelvic radiotherapy is before describing the following late effects and how to manage them: bladder changes; bowel changes; lymphoedema; bone changes; early menopause; sex life; and fertility. It also discusses feelings, relationships, and work, and has details of further support.

Cover image of 'Cervical cancer'

Cervical cancer (March 2017)

Jo's Cervical Cancer Trust

This booklet describes what cervical cancer is, the symptoms, causes, the different types and (briefly) the treatment options.

Cover image of 'Cervical cancer. The facts'

Cervical cancer. The facts (March 2017)

Jo's Cervical Cancer Trust

Credit-card leaflet with facts about cervical cancer, including incidence, the symptoms to look out for, how to reduce the risk, and cervical screening.

Cover image of 'Your guide to cervical cancer'

Your guide to cervical cancer (March 2017)

Jo's Cervical Cancer Trust

A guide for women who have recently been diagnosed with cervical cancer, and those who care about them.  

Cover image of 'Cervical screening (smear test)'

Cervical screening (smear test) (March 2017)

Jo's Cervical Cancer Trust

This booklet explains what cervical screening is, who is eligible, the test itself, and what happens if the result is abnormal.

Cover image of 'Abnormal cervical screening results. The facts'

Abnormal cervical screening results. The facts (May 2017)

Jo's Cervical Cancer Trust

Credit-card leaflet with facts about abnormal cervical screening results in the UK. It also describes briefly the type of abnormal screening results, further tests, and treatment for abnormal cells. It also describes the services that Jo's Cervical Cancer Trust offers to anyone just diagnosed with cervical abnormalities.

Cover image of 'Cervical screening. The facts'

Cervical screening. The facts (March 2017)

Jo's Cervical Cancer Trust

Credit-card leaflet with facts about cervical screening. It also describes briefly what happens during cervical screening and who is invited for screening, and has tips for coping if you are nervous or worried.

Cover image of 'Ovarian and cervical cancer'

Ovarian and cervical cancer (May 2017)

Action Cancer

Z-card with facts about cervical and ovarian cancer, including symptoms and risk factors, diagnosis, the smear test, HPV vaccine and ways to lower your risk of getting cervical cancer. 

Cover image of 'What women need to know about... cervical cancer'

What women need to know about... cervical cancer (March 2017)

The Eve Appeal

Key information about cervical cancer including signs and symptoms, risk factors and how to reduce your risk of developing cancer. 

Cover image of 'Human papillomavirus (HPV). The facts'

Human papillomavirus (HPV). The facts (March 2017)

Jo's Cervical Cancer Trust

Credit-card leaflet with facts about HPV, high risk HPV and cervical cancer, contracting high risk HPV and how to reduce your risk. It also describes the services that Jo's Cervical Cancer Trust offers to anyone concerned about HPV, cervical screening, cervical abnormalities and cervical cancer.

Cover image of 'Large loop excision of the transformation zone (LLETZ)'

Large loop excision of the transformation zone (LLETZ) (March 2017)

Jo's Cervical Cancer Trust

This booklet describes LLETZ (large loop excision of the transformation zone), which may be carried out after an abnormal cervical smear.

Cover image of 'HPV testing'

HPV testing (March 2017)

Jo's Cervical Cancer Trust

HPV (human papillomavirus) testing has been introduced in the UK as part of the National Cervical Screening Programme. This booklet describes what HPV is, how it is transmitted, how the test is carried out and what happens if the result is positive.

Cover image of 'Human papillomavirus (HPV)'

Human papillomavirus (HPV) (March 2017)

Jo's Cervical Cancer Trust

This booklet explains what HPV (human papillomavirus) is and the link with cervical cancer. It describes how HPV is transmitted, how to reduce the risk, and testing for HPV.

Cover image of 'HPV vaccine'

HPV vaccine (March 2017)

Jo's Cervical Cancer Trust

This booklet describes HPV (human papillomavirus) and how the vaccine works. It explains where girls can get the vaccine, how effective it is and the possible side effects.

Cover image of 'The facts about HPV'

The facts about HPV (2017)

Jo's Cervical Cancer Trust

A short film about HPV to dispel some of the myths surrounding the virus. It is hoped that it will help more people understand what the virus is, who can get it, how it can affect them, and what they can do to best protect themselves from cervical cancer. 

Cover image of 'Your smear test after treatment [Urdu]'

Your smear test after treatment [Urdu] (2017)

NHS Health Scotland

This leaflet describes cervical screening tests after treatment for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). It explains what CIN is, what happens after treatment, and why women are now tested for HPV six months after treatment for CIN.

Cover image of 'Your smear test after treatment [Polish]'

Your smear test after treatment [Polish] (2017)

NHS Health Scotland

This leaflet describes cervical screening tests after treatment for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). It explains what CIN is, what happens after treatment, and why women are now tested for HPV six months after treatment for CIN.

Cover image of 'Your smear test after treatment [Chinese, Traditional]'

Your smear test after treatment [Chinese, Traditional] (2017)

NHS Health Scotland

This leaflet describes cervical screening tests after treatment for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). It explains what CIN is, what happens after treatment, and why women are now tested for HPV six months after treatment for CIN.

Cover image of 'Your smear test - after CIN treatment [Easy read]'

Your smear test - after CIN treatment [Easy read] (2017)

NHS Health Scotland

This leaflet describes cervical screening tests after treatment for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). It explains what CIN is, what happens after treatment, and why women are now tested for HPV six months after treatment for CIN.

Cover image of 'Information for trans people. NHS Screening Programmes'

Information for trans people. NHS Screening Programmes (July 2017)

Public Health England

This leaflet is for trans (transgender) and non-binary people in England. It tells you about the adult NHS screening programmes that are available in England and explains who we invite for screening.

Cover image of 'Cervical screening'

Cervical screening (2016)

CHANGE

An easy read booklet about cervical cancer and what happens during cervical screening (a smear test).  

Cover image of 'Symptoms of cervical cancer'

Symptoms of cervical cancer (2016)

CHANGE

An easy read booklet about cervical cancer symptoms and when to see your doctor. 

Cover image of 'Cervical screening and human papillomavirus (HPV) testing'

Cervical screening and human papillomavirus (HPV) testing (2016)

Public Health England

This leaflet tells you about HPV testing. This is a test carried out on the sample of cells taken during cervical screening. It makes no difference to what happens at your screening appointment. 

Cover image of 'Your guide to cervical screening (smear test)'

Your guide to cervical screening (smear test) (June 2015)

Jo's Cervical Cancer Trust

Every day eight women are diagnosed with cervical cancer and three die from the disease. Yet cervical cancer is largely preventable thanks to the NHS cervical screening programme and HPV vaccination programme. In the UK 22% of UK women do not attend their cervical screening (smear test) invitation. This short film aims to give you more information about smear tests: what the test is for and what will happen during the test. It also has information on Human Papillomavirus (HPV), a virus which is the main cause of cervical cancer and cervical abnormalities. The DVD (£5.00) includes versions in Arabic, Bengali Standard, Bengali Sylheti, Chinese, Hindi, Polish, Tamil, and Urdu. You can also watch all versions online.

Cover image of 'The smear test film'

The smear test film (2014)

Jo's Cervical Cancer Trust

'The Smear Test Film' is a health education film resource for women eligible for cervical screening (smear tests) who have mild and moderate learning disabilities. It has been made by Public Health England in association with Jo's Cervical Cancer Trust. Professional guidance and support in the development of this resource was provided by the Better Health Team for Learning Disabilities at Somerset Partnership NHS Foundation Trust. The film has been designed and made by women who have learning disabilities. It aims to give women and their carers information about smear tests and their role in preventing cervical cancer and help women make a decision about whether to attend their smear test invitation.

Cover image of 'Cervical smears and pregnancy'

Cervical smears and pregnancy (December 2013)

Royal College of Obstetricans and Gynaecologists

This patient information leaflet provides advice for women about cervical smear tests and results, and colposcopy, during pregnancy. 

Cover image of 'Are you ready for your screen test? A guide to cervical screening for lesbian and bisexual women'

Are you ready for your screen test? A guide to cervical screening for lesbian and bisexual women (March 2012)

Lesbian and Gay Foundation

Information for lesbian and bisexual women about the importance of cervical screening. It describes the cervix and explains why it is important to be screened, who should be screened, and what happens during screening and afterwards.

Cover image of 'A woman's disease. The history of cervical cancer'

A woman's disease. The history of cervical cancer (2011)

Oxford University Press

Cervical cancer is an emotive disease with multiple connotations. It has stood for the horror of cancer, the curse of femininity, the hope of cutting-edge medical technologies and the promise of screening for malignant tumours. For a long time, this disease was identified with the most dreaded aspects of malignancies: prolonged invalidity and chronic pain, but also physical degradation, shame and social isolation. Cervical cancer displayed in parallel the dangers of being a woman. In the 20th century, innovations initially developed to control cervical cancer - radiotherapy and radium therapy, exfoliate cytology (Pap smear), homogenisation of the 'staging' of tumours, mass campaigns for an early detection of precancerous lesions of the cervix - set standards for diagnosis, treatment and prevention of other malignancies. In the late 20th century, cervical cancer underwent another important change. With the display of the role of selected strands of HPV (Human Papilloma Virus) in the genesis of this malignancy, it was transformed into a sexually transmitted disease. This new understanding of cervical cancer linked it more firmly with lifestyle choices, and thus increased the danger of stigmatisation of patients; on the other hand it opened the possibility for efficient prevention of this malignancy through vaccination. Ilana Lowy follows the disease from antiquity to the 21st century, focussing on the period since the mid-19th century, during which cervical cancer was dissociated from other gynaecological disorders and became a distinct entity. Following the ways in which new developments in science, medicine, and society have affected beliefs about medical progress and an individual's responsibility, gender roles, reproduction, and sex, Lowy demonstrates our understanding of what cervical cancer is, and how it can be prevented and cured. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Do I need a smear test?'

Do I need a smear test? (2010)

Health Scotland on behalf of the Family Advice and Information Resource

Illustrated booklet for women with learning difficulties. It explains what a smear test is, who should have one and when, and what the smear test will show.

Cover image of 'A guide to having a smear test'

A guide to having a smear test (2010)

Family Advice and Information Resource

Illustrated booklet for women with learning difficulties. It explains what a smear test is, why it is important to have one, and what happens during the examination.

Cover image of 'Say no to cancer'

Say no to cancer (2010)

Piatkus (Little, Brown Book Group)

Cancer is increasing at an alarming rate and one in three people will develop cancer at some point in their lives. According to the World Cancer Research Fund, up to 39 per cent of the most common cancers - lung, breast, colorectal, skin, mouth/throat and oesophagus, liver, stomach, prostate, cervical ovarian, testicular, endometrial and pancreatic - are preventable through diet, physical activity and weight control alone. "Say no to cancer" was originally published by Piatkus in 1999 and this greatly expanded edition contains new chapters that reflect the very latest information on the connection between diet and lifestyle and the risk of developing cancer. It offers guidance for people who wish to avoid getting cancer, and for those who want to know what they can do nutritionally if they have cancer and/or want to prevent reoccurrence. By improving your diet and taking the right nutritional supplements you really can say no to cancer. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Eating – help yourself. A guide for patients and their carers'

Eating – help yourself. A guide for patients and their carers (February 2019)

Christie Hospital NHS Trust

Eating may be a problem for people with cancer or other illnesses, particularly when undergoing treatment such as radiotherapy or chemotherapy. This booklet has advice on how to eat well when trying to cope with loss of appetite, changes in taste, dry mouth, difficulties swallowing, feeling full, nausea, diarrhoea, and constipation. It has tips on how to make food as nourishing as possible and ideas for snacks and drinks.

Cover image of 'The cancer whisperer. How to let cancer heal your life'

The cancer whisperer. How to let cancer heal your life (2016)

Coronet (Hodder & Stoughton)

This book does not offer a cure for cancer. It offers a cure for your fear of cancer. Both memoir and self-help book, this is the remarkable chronicle of a passage from 'terminal' diagnosis to exuberant wellness in just a few months. The Cancer Whisperer reverses our traditional adversarial relationship with cancer by teaching us how to listen to it; how to be healed by it as well as seek to cure it; and how to be emotionally free of illness even when physically curtailed. Living on the frontier between her fierce will to live and necessary willingness to die, Sophie - now thriving with cancer - shares her journey with searing honesty, unapologetic vulnerability and intelligent pragmatism. Alongside rare insights into a condition now affecting approximately one in three people, she challenges the mental conditioning we need to overcome to redefine our narratives about cancer. As 'the cancer whisperer', she offers a groundbreaking practical guide that will encourage cancer patients to: Direct their own treatment while preserving their personhood in a system that tends to see them as patients more than people. Engage with fear, anger and grief in healthy and healing ways instead of toughing it out, trying to be positive or collapsing into despair. Radically shift from being a cancer victim to a cancer listener-to seeing cancer less as a disease than as a symptom of other underlying causes, and engaging proactively with whatever changes it calls on them to make. Discover what the author calls 'the whispering, the reaching into a well of darkness and finding your hands painted with light'. Inspired, wise and moving, this book is as unflinching as Lisa Lynch's The C Word, as uplifting as Kris Carr's Crazy, Sexy Cancer, and carries us to a new threshold in our relationship with cancer, strengthening our ability to meet it with courage, creativity, gratitude and grace. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Telling your child you have cancer'

Telling your child you have cancer (January 2017)

University College London Hospital Cancer Collaborative|FruitFly Collective

A short film produced with the Fruit Fly Collective to support parents when they decide to tell their children about their cancer diagnosis. It provides guidance about how and when to tell them, and looks at different age groups and how they may feel and behave when they have been told. 

Cover image of 'Eating well following treatment and recovery from cancer. A guide for patients and carers'

Eating well following treatment and recovery from cancer. A guide for patients and carers (February 2016)

Christie Hospital NHS Trust

Advice about what to eat and what not to eat following treatment. 

Cover image of 'Visiting hospital'

Visiting hospital (2018)

BUPA

This booklet explains types of treatment and some of the health professionals who are helping people with cancer to get better. 

Cover image of 'The symptoms of ovarian cancer'

The symptoms of ovarian cancer (March 2018)

Target Ovarian Cancer

This video describes the symptoms of ovarian cancer.

Cover image of 'Sun safety and skin cancer. The facts, prevention and early detection'

Sun safety and skin cancer. The facts, prevention and early detection (2013)

SKCIN: The Karen Clifford Skin Cancer Charity

Leaflet with information about skin cancer and how to avoid it, including: sunburn; sunbeds; protecting young children; choosing the right sunscreen; applying sunscreen; at risk groups; types of skin cancer.

Cover image of 'Eating after a duodenal stent'

Eating after a duodenal stent (2018)

Pancreatic Cancer Action

This booklet has information about eating after insertion of a duodenal stent. It describes what to expect and the best foods to eat and avoid.

Cover image of 'Surgery [Urdu]'

Surgery [Urdu] (January 2017)

Macmillan Cancer Support

This factsheet explains what cancer is, why surgery might be used to treat it, and how the surgery is carried out. It also describes what to expect before and after the operation, and the possible longer-term complications. Includes the English-language version.

Cover image of 'Nourishing your body during pancreatic cancer treatment'

Nourishing your body during pancreatic cancer treatment (2016)

Pancreatic Cancer Action

Created by dietitians and chefs at University College Cork, this recipe book provides advice on how best to combat cancer-induced weight loss and other eating related problems whilst undergoing pancreatic cancer treatment.  It features over 80 quick, easy and energy dense recipes for nourishing meals and snacks that have been created specifically for people who find it hard to maintain a healthy weight. 

Cover image of 'Coping with advanced cancer [Audio CD]'

Coping with advanced cancer [Audio CD] (2019)

Macmillan Cancer Support

Audio CD of the booklet, with information to help people who have been told their cancer has spread or come back, and for their relatives and friends. It covers issues such as deciding about treatment, sources of emotional help, coping with day-to-day life, and putting affairs in order. Includes details of useful organisations and other resources such as books and websites.

Cover image of 'What does it mean?'

What does it mean? (2018)

BUPA

This booklet explains what cancer is and explores some common worries and feelings that children may have - reassuring them that however they react, it’s ok.

Cover image of 'Life at home'

Life at home (2018)

BUPA

This booklet looks at some of the side-effects of different types of cancer treatments. It also offers ideas for small ways children may like to help out at home.  

Cover image of 'Bowel cancer'

Bowel cancer (2019)

Guts UK

Information about bowel cancer, including causes, symptoms, diagnosis, treatment options, and secondary bowel cancer.

Cover image of 'Bowel cancer [Urdu]'

Bowel cancer [Urdu] (September 2017)

Macmillan Cancer Support

This factsheet is about bowel cancer and its treatment. It includes the English-language version. 

Cover image of 'Your guide to thyroid cancer [Arabic]'

Your guide to thyroid cancer [Arabic] (2018)

British Thyroid Foundation

This leaflet describes cancer of the thyroid, the main types, the symptoms, diagnosis and treatment options.

Cover image of 'Colostomy. Hints and tips'

Colostomy. Hints and tips (May 2014)

Dansac Limited

This illustrated booklet aims to guide people with a colostomy through the first months after the operation and help them adapt to life with a stoma. It covers care of the stoma (including changing the bag, disposal of products, and irrigation) going home after the operation, diet and nutrition (including odour, wind, diarrhoea and constipation), clothing, sex and relationships, exercise, going back to work and travel.

Cover image of 'Your guide to osteosarcoma'

Your guide to osteosarcoma (December 2017)

Bone Cancer Research Trust

This booklet for children and young people explains what cancer is, and describes the different types of bone cancer and how osteosarcoma is treated. It also covers topics such as body image and what happens after treatment. Includes a glossary of medical terms.

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