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The web Directory of Information Materials for People Affected by Cancer is regularly updated and currently has details of over 1,900 booklets, leaflets, books and audiovisual materials for people affected by cancer. Most have been published in the last five years but we have included some older ones that are still useful.

Results: 1665

Cover image of 'The carer's bible'

The carer's bible (2018)

Waring A

This accessible and detailed guide includes practical tips, checklists for best practice, descriptions of their experience from a wide range of carers that addresses solutions to common problems, and expert advice on how to deliver compassionate and dignified care to older people. Uniquely, Amanda Waring also provides support and guidance for the carer, how to maintain energy and commitment, how to recognize signs of compassion fatigue and where carers can get help if they need it. The Carer's Bible is an invaluable, inspiring guide to how to give your loved one the best possible care while addressing the anxieties that all carers suffer. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'A funny thing happened on the way to chemo. A rather unusual memoir [currently being reviewed by our volunteers]'

A funny thing happened on the way to chemo. A rather unusual memoir [currently being reviewed by our volunteers] (2018)

von Hirsch I

"Cancer is not a laughing matter, as I was told by a cross German lady from Dortmund when I showed her this journal. She had herself had breast cancer and is right of course; there are lots of things that are not fun about cancer, most of them unavoidable. I was therefore as surprised as the next person to realise that a huge amount of funny things happen on the way to chemo, or indeed on the way to most places, and that once you get your eye in, you completely forget to be scared..." This is not just an educational book about cancer, although it is certainly safe to give to cancer patients as a cheerful present. More importantly, it sheds new light on why Kim Kardashian is worth Keeping Up With, what playlists to make for MRI scans, the truth behind the legend of Medea, bikini etiquette on a deserted beach, what to do with a glut of rainbow chard, what an Oscar-winner should say in an acceptance speech, how to deal with cold-callers selling life insurance, and what to wear on a March Against Menopause (layers, obviously)... (Publisher)

Cover image of 'On smaller dogs and larger life questions'

On smaller dogs and larger life questions (2018)

Figes K

Coming up to her sixtieth birthday, Kate Figes found herself turning to the larger questions of family, love and life's meaning. It is like this author to examine different stages in writing, and her books - from new motherhood and adolescence to coupledom and infidelity - testify to this way of understanding herself and others: so naturally she turned to writing to explore the challenges of becoming sixty. And then - a horrible, and sudden diagnosis of breast cancer which had metastasised. Instead of a gentle journey into middle age, Kate Figes began to write for her life. Now, clawing back confidence and control was not just the ordinary business of these years: it was the only way to try and survive great pain and emotional turmoil. As her writing became an honest reflection on ageing, failing, regrets and the importance of childhood memory, friends, family and love she found a new determination to live to the full and about finding ways to face up to a shortened life expectancy with dignity. Original, passionate, funny and moving, On Smaller Dogs and Larger Life Questions will resonate with anyone dealing with the many griefs and freedoms of midlife. It is about living with a life-threatening disease but it is even more: an intelligent and passionate look at the way we can approach disappointment and trouble, friendship and love - every day. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Not that kind of love. A sister, a brother, some tumours and a cat'

Not that kind of love. A sister, a brother, some tumours and a cat (2018)

Wise C, Wise G

A moving, thought-provoking and surprisingly humorous book which is both a description of a journey to death and a celebration of the act of living. Based on Clare Wise's blog, which she started when she was first diagnosed with cancer in 2013, Not That Kind of Love charts the highs and lows of the last three years of Clare's life. The end result is not a book that fills you with despair and anguish. On the contrary, Not That Kind of Love should be read by everybody for its candour, and for its warmth and spirit. Clare is an astonishingly dynamic, witty and fun personality, and her positivity and energy exude from every page. As she becomes too weak to type, her brother - the actor Greg Wise - takes over, and the book morphs into a beautiful meditation on life, and the necessity of talking about death. With echoes of Atul Gawande's Being Mortal and Cathy Rentzenbrink's The Last Act of Love, it is a very special read that rejoices in the extraordinary and often underestimated sibling bond, and the importance of making the most of the ordinary pleasures life has to offer. As Greg Wise writes in the book: 'Celebrate the small things, the small moments. If you find yourself with matching socks as you leave the house in the morning, that is a cause for celebration. If the rest of the day is spent finding the cure for cancer, or brokering world peace, then that's a bonus.' (Publisher) 

Cover image of 'What to expect when someone important to you is dying. A guide for carers, families and friends of dying people'

What to expect when someone important to you is dying. A guide for carers, families and friends of dying people (March 2018)

Hospice UK

This booklet is for people caring for someone who is, or who may soon be, in the last stages of life. It is designed to help them prepare for what to expect in the very last days and hours of a person's life. It explains the physical changes that someone may go through when they are dying and what can be done to make them more comfortable, the kind of care a dying person can expect to receive, and where to turn to for help if there are concerns about the end-of-life care received.

Cover image of 'Understanding cervical screening results and CIN'

Understanding cervical screening results and CIN (March 2018)

Macmillan Cancer Support

This booklet is about cervical screening. It is for anyone who wants information about how screening is used to find and treat abnormal cells to prevent cervical cancer. It explains what cervical screening involves and what your test results mean. It has information about the most common abnormal result, called cervical intra-epithelial neoplasia (CIN).

Cover image of 'Spoiler alert: the hero dies. A memoir of love, loss and other four-letter words [currently being reviewed by our volunteers]'

Spoiler alert: the hero dies. A memoir of love, loss and other four-letter words [currently being reviewed by our volunteers] (2018)

Ausiello M

In this evocative and gorgeously wrought memoir reminiscent of Rob Sheffield’s Love Is a Mixtape and George Hodgman’s Bettyville, Michael Ausiello—a respected TV columnist and founder and editor-in-chief of TVLine.com—remembers his late husband, and the lessons, love, and laughter that they shared throughout their fourteen years together. For the past decade, TV fans of all stripes have counted upon Michael Ausiello’s insider knowledge to get the scoop on their favorite shows and stars. From his time at Soaps in Depth to his influential stints at TV Guide and Entertainment Weekly to his current role as founder and editor-in-chief of the wildly popular website TVLine.com, Michael has established himself as the go-to expert when it comes to our most popular form of entertainment. What many of his fans don’t know, however, is that while his professional life was in full swing, Michael had to endure the greatest of personal tragedies: his husband, Kit Cowan, was diagnosed with a rare and very aggressive form of neuroendocrine cancer. Over the course of eleven months, Kit and Michael did their best to combat the deadly disease, but Kit succumbed to his illness in February 2015. In this heartbreaking and darkly hilarious memoir, Michael tells the story of his harrowing and challenging last year with Kit while revisiting the thirteen years that preceded it, and how the undeniably powerful bond between him and Kit carried them through all manner of difficulty—always with laughter front and center in their relationship. Instead of a tale of sadness and loss, Spoiler Alert: The Hero Dies is an unforgettable, inspiring, and beautiful testament to the resilience and strength of true love. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Follow the child. Planning and having the best end-of-life care for your child [currently being reviewed by our volunteers]'

Follow the child. Planning and having the best end-of-life care for your child [currently being reviewed by our volunteers] (2018)

Langton-Gilks S

Drawing on her family's own experiences and those of other parents facing the death of a child from illness or a life-limiting condition, Sacha Langton-Gilks explains the challenges, planning, and conversations that can be expected during this traumatic period. Practical advice such as how to work with the healthcare professionals, drawing up an Advance Care Plan, and how to move care into the home sit alongside tender observations of how such things worked in her own family's story. The book also includes a template person-centred planning document, developed by experts in the field. Empowering and reassuring, this book will help families plan and ensure the best possible end-of-life care for a child or young person. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Going to the doctor'

Going to the doctor (2018)

Hollins S, Bernal J, Slowie D, Webb B (illustrator)

Going to the doctor can be worrying. For people with a learning disability, there may be the added worry of not being able to explain what’s wrong, as well as not understanding what’s happening. This book shows Jim, Anne and Laura who visit their General Practice for different reasons. The stories look at the ways the doctor and nurse listen to each of them, asking questions, explaining what will happen next and checking their understanding so that they can give informed consent. Many of the scenarios shown in the book form part of the annual health check. They also show how to involve the supporter appropriately. This book can be used to help someone get ready to visit the doctor, as a reasonable adjustment during the consultation, and for wider health promotion work. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Managing the late effects of pelvic radiotherapy in men'

Managing the late effects of pelvic radiotherapy in men (April 2018)

Macmillan Cancer Support

A booklet for men who have had radiotherapy to the pelvic area and who are experiencing late effects. It explains what pelvic radiotherapy is before describing the following late effects and how to manage them: bladder changes; bowel changes; lymphoedema; bone changes; sex life; and fertility. It also discusses feelings, relationships, and work, and has details of further support.

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