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Publications directory

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The web Directory of Information Materials for People Affected by Cancer is regularly updated and currently has details of over 1,900 booklets, leaflets, books and audiovisual materials for people affected by cancer. Most have been published in the last five years but we have included some older ones that are still useful.

Results: 339

Cover image of 'Only one of me. A love letter from mum'

Only one of me. A love letter from mum (2018)

Graffeg Limited

'There's only one mum quite like me. I wish that there were two. I'd have more time to spend And I would spend it all with you.' Most of us can't imagine having the time we spend with our children or loved ones cut short, but this is the reality being faced by mother of two Lisa Wells, who was diagnosed with terminal bowel and liver cancer in December 2017 at the age of 31. The Only One of Me project grew from Lisa's determination to leave a lasting legacy for her daughters and her desire to help other families rally against the difficulties of loss. Only One of Me is the product of Lisa's lifelong love of writing and a newfound friendship with award-winning children's author Michelle Robinson. The two collaborated on this tender and moving rhyming poem, with charming illustrations by Catalina Echeverri, which is both a love letter to Lisa's own daughters and a testament to the unwavering strength of parental love, a timeless message for families facing the challenges of bereavement. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Dear cancer. A diary of hope to help you through'

Dear cancer. A diary of hope to help you through (2018)

Trapeze (Orion)

Renowned as a much-loved and highly respected BBC journalist, Victoria Derbyshire has spent 20 years finding the human story behind the headlines. In 2015 she found herself at the heart of the news, with a devastating breast cancer diagnosis. With honesty and openness, she decided to live out her treatment and recovery in the spotlight in a series of video diaries that encouraged thousands to seek diagnosis and help. Victoria has kept a diary since she was nine years old and in this book she shares her day to day experiences of life following her diagnosis and coming to terms with a future that wasn't planned. From the moment she woke up to find her right breast had collapsed, to telling her partner and children, through to mastectomy and chemotherapy. From wearing a wig to work and hiding it from her colleagues, to the relief and joy of finishing treatment before immediately flying to Glasgow to present a debate on the European Referendum. y sharing her story, she became the person that mums, daughters, sisters, husbands, boyfriends and family members contacted to thank as they tried to find ways to cope with their own and their loved ones' prognosis, and needed to know that they were not alone. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'A funny thing happened on the way to chemo. A rather unusual memoir'

A funny thing happened on the way to chemo. A rather unusual memoir (2018)

Short Books

"Cancer is not a laughing matter, as I was told by a cross German lady from Dortmund when I showed her this journal. She had herself had breast cancer and is right of course; there are lots of things that are not fun about cancer, most of them unavoidable. I was therefore as surprised as the next person to realise that a huge amount of funny things happen on the way to chemo, or indeed on the way to most places, and that once you get your eye in, you completely forget to be scared..." This is not just an educational book about cancer, although it is certainly safe to give to cancer patients as a cheerful present. More importantly, it sheds new light on why Kim Kardashian is worth Keeping Up With, what playlists to make for MRI scans, the truth behind the legend of Medea, bikini etiquette on a deserted beach, what to do with a glut of rainbow chard, what an Oscar-winner should say in an acceptance speech, how to deal with cold-callers selling life insurance, and what to wear on a March Against Menopause (layers, obviously)... (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Anti cancer living. The six-step solution to transform your health'

Anti cancer living. The six-step solution to transform your health (2018)

Vermilion (Random House)

“You have cancer.” These are perhaps the most feared three words that will ever come out of a doctor’s mouth, and more and more people are hearing them. Yet most patients (and some doctors) do not realize that lifestyle changes can dramatically reduce risk, assist treatment and improve chances of surviving and even thriving after a diagnosis. Over the course of a major study Servan-Schreiber designed with Dr Lorenzo Cohen at the MD Anderson Cancer Center, six key areas have emerged: love and social support, stress management, rest, movement, nutrition and avoiding environmental toxins. Each plays a role--but it's the synergies created by this potent "Mix of Six" that can bring about real shifts in health and well-being, significantly improving quality of life and positively supporting conventional cancer treatments. Dr. David Servan-Schreiber's Anticancer introduced a revolutionary way to understand and confront cancer, changing the lives of millions around the world. He laid out the principles of integrative care that had allowed him to live many years beyond expectations for his own cancer, but readers have long requested a specific plan to implement his approach. Anti cancer Living is that book. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The essential guide to cervical cancer'

The essential guide to cervical cancer (2018)

Need2Know

Awareness of cervical cancer has grown in recent years and many women are looking to find out more. It is estimated that 3,000 women in the UK are diagnosed with the cancer each year. This book aims to help women of all ages find out more about testing for cervical cancer, understanding how important it is to go for regular check-ups and overcoming the physical and emotional challenges cervical cancer can bring. Written in a sensitive, straightforward manner, the book guides women through the entire process from check-ups to diagnosis, treatment and aftercare. There is also an extensive list of sources of help and support. If you’re supporting a partner, daughter or friend through cervical cancer, or just want to know more about gynaecological health and check-ups, this guide will provide you with the sound, sensitive advice you need. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Goodbye Daisy'

Goodbye Daisy (2018)

Hashtag Press

Elsie and Daisy are best friends. They go to a special school, a school where the children have helpers and some of the children use wheels to get around. Elsie waits at the classroom door for her best friend to arrive every day. One day Daisy doesn’t arrive in school. All the grown-ups are crying; they are sad because Daisy has died. Elsie will never see her friend again. Elsie isn’t sad though, she is cross with her friend for not saying goodbye. Goodbye Daisy is based on Stephanie Nimmo’s own experiences of explaining to her daughter Daisy’s friends that Daisy had died. Aimed mainly at children with profound learning disabilities it is also a heart-warming social story and support guide about the death of a school friend that will support help parents, carers and professionals support a child through their loss and grief. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Only one of me. A love letter from dad'

Only one of me. A love letter from dad (2018)

Graffeg Limited

There's only one dad quite like me. I wish that there were two. I'd have more time to spend And I would spend it all with you. Most of us can't imagine having the time we spend with our children or loved ones cut short, but this is the reality being faced by mother of two Lisa Wells, who was diagnosed with terminal bowel and liver cancer in December 2017, at the age of 31. The Only One of Me project grew from Lisa's determination to leave a lasting legacy for her daughters and her desire to help other families rally against the difficulties of loss. Only One of Me is the product of Lisa's lifelong love of writing and a newfound friendship with award-winning children's author Michelle Robinson. The two collaborated on this tender and moving rhyming poem, with charming illustrations by Tim Budgen, which is both a love letter to Lisa's own daughters and a testament to the unwavering strength of parental love, a timeless message for families facing the challenges of bereavement. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The complete guide to breast cancer: how to feel empowered and take control'

The complete guide to breast cancer: how to feel empowered and take control (2018)

Vermilion (Random House)

The book you can trust to support you at every stage of your treatment - and beyond. Professor Trisha Greenhalgh, an academic GP, and Dr Liz O’Riordan, a Consultant Breast Cancer Surgeon, are not only outstanding doctors, but they have also experienced breast cancer first-hand. The Complete Guide to Breast Cancer brings together all the knowledge they have gathered as patients and as doctors to give you and your family a trusted, thorough and up-to-date source of information. Designed to empower you during your breast cancer treatment, it covers: simple explanations of every breast cancer treatment; coping with the emotional burden of breast cancer; frank advice about sex and relationships; staying healthy during and after treatment; dealing with the fear of recurrence; living with secondary breast cancer. Packed full of all the things the authors wished they’d known when they were diagnosed, and tips on how to cope with surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy and beyond, this is the only book you need to read to guide you through your breast cancer diagnosis. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Love and remission: my life, my man, my cancer'

Love and remission: my life, my man, my cancer (2018)

Trigger

In her mid-twenties, balancing a stable job and a partying lifestyle, Annie was also on the hunt for a man. She wanted to find Mr Right, get married, buy a house, and live the life she'd always wanted. But then one day, she found a lump ... Breast cancer. The two words that would derail Annie's life. Suddenly she realised how short her life had been, and the very idea of finding love seemed impossible. As her hair fell out, and her social life crumbled, her mental health deteriorated. She began to question if she would actually survive. Struggling with an identity crisis and worryingly low moods, she wondered if she'd ever be able to live the normal life that had been within her reach only months earlier. Love and Remission tells the tale of a young woman in search of love and mental wellbeing. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'A new kind of normal'

A new kind of normal (2018)

Self-published

They say there’s a book in all of us, but I doubt I would ever have written one had it not have been for my diagnosis of breast cancer in 2011. ‘A New Kind of Normal' is the story of my life up to and moving on from that moment. Growing up in the 60's, working through the 70's and 80's, juggling a career in TV and radio while bringing up three children and surviving two divorces. From the moment I knew what a bra was, I’d wanted breasts: I even crafted a pair of blue plasticine boobs for myself, as nature made me wait until I was 15 for breasts of my own! Through cancer I lost them both, and with the chemotherapy; all my hair, my fingernails, and more worryingly, a sense of whom I was. My hair grew back, as did my fingernails, but I still struggled with my identity. What I’ve written isn't a diary, nor a self-help guide, and it's not just about cancer. I’ve taken a really good look at the little girl I was and the woman I grew into, and why I went to such lengths to try and claw back some of what cancer had taken from me - it's not everyone's way I appreciate, and it’s been an interesting exercise trying to ascertain why it was mine! I’ve been honest, open, and meticulous when it comes to detail, as I firmly believe that if you take away the mystery, you can take away some of the fear. But there’s a lot to laugh about here too, as luckily I’ve always been able to see the funny side of a situation, preferring that to the occasional overwhelming despair I felt. In this book I've tried to move the disease away from the medical professionals and the hospitals, and to bring it into the day to day, because that's where it sits. Over the last seven years I’ve come to realise that the ripple effect of cancer is far reaching, affecting not just those of us living with it but everyone around us. 'A New Kind of Normal' gives an insight into my relationship with my then partner, now husband; my children and their reaction to my illness, my family and friends, my work colleagues, people who wrote to me, and the professionals who cared for me; everybody reacts differently. Breast cancer assaults your femininity - the treatment is tough and the surgery brutal.  It isn't easy, but it is possible, and I'd like to feel this book may be a source of comfort to anyone who's life is touched by breast cancer; maybe even help them to find their 'New Kind of Normal'. There are many things in life we may have to give up on, but hope is not one of them. (P

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