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Publications directory

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The web Directory of Information Materials for People Affected by Cancer is regularly updated and currently has details of over 1,900 booklets, leaflets, books and audiovisual materials for people affected by cancer. Most have been published in the last five years but we have included some older ones that are still useful.

Results: 339

Cover image of 'Understanding cancer'

Understanding cancer (2018)

Booklife Publishing

Cancer is a group of diseases in which abnormal cells divide and spread. There are many different kinds of cancer, and different forms of treatment. Cancer is very scary, and can be very difficult to handle physically, emotionally, and mentally. Learning about how cancer affects the body and how it can be treated can help readers who know someone with cancer, or who have cancer themselves. This book can help readers understand complex medical terms and processes through straightforward text. Full-color photographs and fact boxes highlight important information. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Everything happens for a reason and other lies I've loved'

Everything happens for a reason and other lies I've loved (2018)

SPCK Publishing

London-born Kate Bowler, a thirty-five year-old professor at the school of divinity at Duke, had finally had a baby with her childhood sweetheart when she began to feel jabbing pains in her stomach. She lost thirty pounds, guzzled antacid, and visited doctors for three months before she was finally diagnosed with Stage IV colon cancer. As Kate navigates the aftermath of her diagnosis, she pulls the reader into her life and her history - affectionately filled with a colourful retinue of friends, mega-church preachers, parents, and doctors - and shares her irreverent, laser-sharp reflections on faith, friendship, love, and death. She wonders why suffering makes her feel like a loser and explores the burden of positivity. Trying to relish the time she still has with her son and husband, she realizes she must cure her habit of 'skipping to the end' and planning the next move. An historian of the American Prosperity Gospel (the creed of the megachurches that promises believers a cure for tragedy, if they just want it badly enough) Kate finds that she craves these same 'outrageous certainties'. Why is it so hard to surrender when she knows there are no spiritual guarantees? (Publisher)

Cover image of '100 questions and answers about prostate cancer'

100 questions and answers about prostate cancer (2018)

Jones and Bartlett Publishers

Receiving a prostate cancer diagnosis is a difficult experience, and leaves patients and their caregivers feeling anxious and overwhelmed. What is prostate cancer? What are the treatment options? What are the sources of support? The only text to provide both the doctor's and patient's point of view, 100 Questions & Answers About Prostate Cancer, Fifth Edition provides authoritative, practical answers to these questions, and many more. This updated Fifth Edition provides a comprehensive discussion of what you can expect post-diagnosis along with patient commentary to give you a real-life understanding of what these steps might mean for your day-to-day life. This book is an invaluable resource for anyone coping with the uncertainty of a prostate cancer diagnosis. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The magical wood'

The magical wood (2018)

Lemon Drop Books

This is a story about loss, friendship and hope. The Magical Wood is set in a beautiful wood with a river wandering through. One cold and stormy day, the wind blew a terrible gale. The next day the tree family woke to find that Strongest Tree had fallen to the woodland floor and had sadly died. How would the tree family survive the seasons without the strength of Strongest Tree? Throughout each season the tree family are visited by a new animal, offering advice and support to the trees. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'If all the world were…'

If all the world were… (2018)

Frances Lincoln Children’s Books

A moving, lyrical picture book about a young girl's love for her granddad and how she copes when he dies, written by poet and playwright Joseph Coelho. This beautifully illustrated, powerful and ultimately uplifting text is the ideal way to introduce children to the concept of death and dying, particularly children who have lost a grandparent. (Publisher) 

Cover image of 'Milkshakes and morphine. A memoir of love and loss'

Milkshakes and morphine. A memoir of love and loss (2018)

Square Peg (Vintage)

This is a singular memoir: an excavation of mother love, a candid account of the agonies, and absurdities, of the cancer experience, and a doggedly optimistic paean to life. When Genevieve Fox finds a lump in her throat, she turns up for the hospital diagnosis in a party frock and fancy hair. I can’t have cancer, she thinks. I’ve done my hair. But there is another reason she can’t countenance cancer. Genevieve was orphaned to it at the age of nine. Genevieve’s story weaves together past and present as she recalls her rackety, unconventional childhood, while also facing the spectre of being lost to her young boys. Yet, she confronts her treatment with the same sassy survival instinct that characterised her childhood misadventures. Through an extraordinary alchemy, Genevieve takes life’s precariousness and turns it on its head. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Echo's sister'

Echo's sister (2018)

HarperCollins

Twelve-year-old El has planned on making her first week at a new school fantastic. She won’t go by her given name, Laughter. She’ll sit in the back of the classroom where she can make new friends. She won’t even have time to think about all the fun her old friends are having without her. Everything will be great. But when her dad picks her up after school and tells her that her younger sister, Echo, has a life-threatening illness, her world is suddenly turned upside down. And with her parents now pressed for time and money, El feels lost and powerless. Then she befriends Octavius, the only other kid in school who gets what she’s going through. As El begins to adjust to her new life, she soon finds that maybe a little hope and a lot of love can overcome any obstacle. (Publishers)

Cover image of 'A moment of grace. A story of love and loss'

A moment of grace. A story of love and loss (2018)

Ebury Press (Penguin Random House)

Patrick Dillon and Nicola Thorold were together for twenty-eight years. Patrick was an award-winning architect and writer and Nicola a leading figure in theatre, awarded an OBE for her contribution to the arts at London’s Roundhouse. Their two children were almost grown-up. Life was good. And then, in May 2015, Nicola was diagnosed with leukaemia. After several rounds of treatment, a bone marrow transplant and many waves of recovery and decline, she died thirteen months after her diagnosis. Six months later, at Christmas, Patrick started to write. A Moment of Grace is the searing, tender account of Patrick’s life with Nicola and her illness, and his life after her loss. But it is more than a story of illness and unbearable grief: it is a book of memory, of home, of family. It is a tale of the transfiguring power of love. Heartbreaking, life-affirming and truly unforgettable, A Moment of Grace is one man’s journey to find life after his wife’s death. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Spike and the blue chair'

Spike and the blue chair (2018)

Austin Macauley

The writer tells the story of her family and their transition through grief and bereavement. However, the story is told through the eyes of Spike the Cat, who joins them at the start of their crisis and takes on the role of observer, protector and helper. Spike is curious about many things, but he is especially curious about the blue chair. One day, he discovers its magic and begins to see how he can help his family by gently leading them onto its seat. He is a cat with purpose, helping his family through the 'rubbish days' that slowly change into new hope and fresh beginnings. He watches as they become a new blended family and learns what it means to move on with courage and love. "For cats know what you're thinking, they know just how you feel; They soak up all your sadness and purr with steadfast zeal." 

Cover image of 'Death and the elephant. How cancer saved my life'

Death and the elephant. How cancer saved my life (2018)

Unbound

12 June 1995. On his twenty-eighth birthday, Raz Shaw was a directionless gambling addict doing a telesales job that was eating up every trace of what soul he had left. The next day he would be diagnosed with stage 4 sclerosing mediastinal non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma of the large cell type. As he tells it, cancer saved his life. He was given the all-clear in March 1996, and stopped gambling for good that April. After a year away recuperating, he turned his back on the highly paid job that had devoured him and re-assimilated himself into the world of theatre that had once made him feel so alive. It took him a long time to realise quite how much these recoveries were bound up with one another – now he is ready to tell his story. Death and the Elephant is a memoir of living through and beyond illness and addiction. Blessed with the ability to find humour even in life’s darkest moments, Raz charts his struggles with irreverence and unflinching perspective. This is his story, but it’s also a universal one – an honest, funny, sometimes raw, and often inappropriate glimpse into the mind of a young man dealing with a life-threatening illness in the only way he knows how: by laughing in its face. (Publisher)

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