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The web Directory of Information Materials for People Affected by Cancer is regularly updated and currently has details of over 1,900 booklets, leaflets, books and audiovisual materials for people affected by cancer. Most have been published in the last five years but we have included some older ones that are still useful.

Results: 7

Cover image of 'Help with the cost of cancer in England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland'

Help with the cost of cancer in England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland (April 2019)

Macmillan Cancer Support

This easy to use booklet contains up-to-date information about benefits and other sources of financial help for people affected by cancer.

Cover image of 'Breast cancer and hair loss'

Breast cancer and hair loss (January 2018)

Breast Cancer Care

Many people will lose either some or all of their hair as a result of treatment for breast cancer. For some, this is the most distressing side effect of treatment. Some people find that being prepared for hair loss before it occurs helps them cope better when it happens. This booklet explains how you may lose your hair and the effect it can have. It looks at how to care for your hair and scalp during and after treatment and the different headwear you may want to try, including wigs and headscarves. It includes step-by-step guides to tying headscarves and tips on recreating the illusion of eyebrows and eyelashes. The final part of the booklet discusses what usually happens when your hair grows back and how to look after it.

Cover image of 'Help with health costs'

Help with health costs (August 2018)

Age UK

Most NHS services are free but there are charges for prescriptions, dental treatment, sight tests, glasses and contact lenses and wigs and fabric supports. This factsheet explains how the NHS Low Income Scheme helps people on a low income with charges and the cost of travelling to receive NHS treatment.  The factsheet explains what you are entitled to if you: are aged 60 and over; receive Pension Credit Guarantee Credit.

Cover image of 'Coping with hair loss'

Coping with hair loss (August 2017)

Macmillan Cancer Support

This booklet is about hair loss. It is for anyone coping with changes to their hair during and after cancer treatment. It explains how cancer treatment may affect your hair, how to prepare for and cope with hair loss, and what to expect after treatment finishes.

Cover image of 'Chemo summer. An uplifting breast cancer experience'

Chemo summer. An uplifting breast cancer experience (2017)

Austin Macauley

In Chemo Summer Jane Hoggar takes the reader through a light-hearted and informative account of her discovery of breast cancer and its cure. Cancer of any description has the capacity to chill those it affects and their loved ones. But for Jane Hoggar early discovery and diagnosis provided for a satisfactory resolution. And it's these small details that might well help people in a similar situation. For example, Jane did not discover a lump, which is the usual thing in breast cancer, but a sag' when she raised her arms and it was her insistence that something was wrong that resulted in a vital early medical diagnosis. All the side issues are covered in the book, effects of chemo and radiotherapy, hair loss and wigs, changes in diet and exercise, making Chemo Summer a valuable and engaging look into a serious and often frightening subject. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Nowhere hair'

Nowhere hair (2015)

Thousand Words Press

The little girl in Nowhere Hair knows two things: Her mom's hair is not on her head anymore, so therefore it must be somewhere around the house. After searching the obvious places, the story reveals that her mother, although going through cancer treatment, is still silly, attentive, happy and yes, sometimes very tired and cranky. She learns that she didn't cause the cancer, can't catch it, and that Mommy still is very much up for the job of mothering. The book, written in rhyme, explains hats, scarves, wigs, going bald in public, and the idea of being nice to people who may look a little different than you. It ends with the idea that what is inside of us is far more important than how we look on the outside. For any parent or grandparent, Nowhere Hair offers a comfortable platform to explain something that is inherently very difficult. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Cancer made me a shallower person. A memoir in comics'

Cancer made me a shallower person. A memoir in comics (2006)

HarperCollins

Miriam Engelberg is a successful cartoonist who was diagnosed with breast cancer at the age of 43. Like many who face trauma, tragedy and illness, she was unable tell her story in traditional written and visual forms. Instead, she has written a distinctly unique cartoon memoir. Following in the Art Spiegelman tradition of graphic novels, Engelberg walks us through every emotional and physical stage of the disease, from diagnosis to a return to 'normal' life and everything in between: waiting for the biopsy results by pretending to be doing everything but that, awkwardly breaking the diagnostic news to horrified acquaintances, shopping for wigs while fighting nausea and disorientation from her cancer drugs, feeling like an outsider in support groups, and speculating about what caused the cancer in the first place - overzealous cheese consumption or apathy about multi-vitamins? 'Cancer Made Me A Shallower Person' is an offbeat and darkly humorous account of one very funny woman's battle with an uncertain and often fatal illness. (Publisher)

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