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Publications directory

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The web Directory of Information Materials for People Affected by Cancer is regularly updated and currently has details of over 1,900 booklets, leaflets, books and audiovisual materials for people affected by cancer. Most have been published in the last five years but we have included some older ones that are still useful.

Results: 232

Cover image of 'Feel more like you. Expert advice on caring for your skin, nails and hair during cancer treatment'

Feel more like you. Expert advice on caring for your skin, nails and hair during cancer treatment (September 2019)

Macmillan Cancer Support

This booklet explains how certain cancer treatments can cause changes to your appearance. It is for people who have had changes to their skin, nails and hair because of cancer treatment. It gives advice on how to manage these changes to help you feel more like you again. We hope it helps you deal with some of the questions or feelings you may have. 

Cover image of 'Pampering therapy'

Pampering therapy (April 2019)

Look Good...Feel Better

Information about Look Good Feel Better with details of workshop locations in the UK.

Cover image of 'Breast cancer and hair loss'

Breast cancer and hair loss (January 2018)

Breast Cancer Care

Many people will lose either some or all of their hair as a result of treatment for breast cancer. For some, this is the most distressing side effect of treatment. Some people find that being prepared for hair loss before it occurs helps them cope better when it happens. This booklet explains how you may lose your hair and the effect it can have. It looks at how to care for your hair and scalp during and after treatment and the different headwear you may want to try, including wigs and headscarves. It includes step-by-step guides to tying headscarves and tips on recreating the illusion of eyebrows and eyelashes. The final part of the booklet discusses what usually happens when your hair grows back and how to look after it.

Cover image of 'Coping with hair loss'

Coping with hair loss (August 2017)

Macmillan Cancer Support

This booklet is about hair loss. It is for anyone coping with changes to their hair during and after cancer treatment. It explains how cancer treatment may affect your hair, how to prepare for and cope with hair loss, and what to expect after treatment finishes.

Cover image of 'Pretty sick. The beauty guide for woman with cancer. How to look your best when you feel your worst'

Pretty sick. The beauty guide for woman with cancer. How to look your best when you feel your worst (2017)

Piatkus (Little, Brown Book Group)

The ultimate resource to looking your best during and after cancer treatment, from a veteran beauty industry insider. Like many women who receive the shattering diagnosis of cancer, Caitlin Kiernan was concerned about her health and her future, but also about how the treatment would affect how she felt and looked - would she lose her hair? Would she lose her nails? How would she look after a double mastectomy? But unlike other women who battle cancer, Kiernan has spent her entire career as a beauty editor, beauty director (most recently for Life & Style Weekly), and now beauty producer. As someone who works in the public eye and in the fashion industry, Kiernan had to quickly learn how to look her best even when she was feeling her worst. So she called on her list of extensive contacts and beauty insiders - from hair professionals to top medical doctors (at institutions like Memorial Sloan Kettering and Mt Sinai Hospital) to style mavens and even celebrities (including Wendy Williams and Hoda Kotb) - to gather the best and most useful beauty tips for cancer treatment. The result is Pretty Sick: the ultimate guide to beauty during (and after) cancer treatment, covering skin care, hair care (and wig shopping), nail care, makeup, an explanation of breast cancer surgical options, style advice for life post mastectomy, and much, much more. Illustrated with charming line drawings and peppered with advice from celebrities and cancer survivors, Pretty Sick will be a welcome and trusted resource during treatment, helping women to look their best even when they don't feel their best. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Look good...feel better confidence kit. A guide to managing the appearance-related effects of cancer treatment'

Look good...feel better confidence kit. A guide to managing the appearance-related effects of cancer treatment (2015)

Look Good...Feel Better

This booklet and accompanying DVD has information and advice about make-up, skincare, hand and nail care, wig selection and cutting, scarf tying and head coverings to help manage changes in personal appearance caused by treatment for cancer.

Cover image of 'Laryngectomy is not a tragedy. An introduction to pharyngeal speech'

Laryngectomy is not a tragedy. An introduction to pharyngeal speech (2013)

Cancer Laryngectomee Trust

This updated edition contains the original chapters written by Sydney Norgate in 1989 plus additional material by Dr Nicola Oswald on current speech methods and future developments. It will provide help and encouragement to all laryngectomy patients and their families. It is full of practical advice and information, as well as reassurance. The author, who had himself had his larynx removed, wrote from personal experience of the problems caused by the loss of normal speech, and describes the method of learning to use substitute pharyngeal speech. Written in a straightforward, humorous style and illustrated with cartoons 'Laryngectomy is not a Tragedy' has proved to be a valuable source of advice and inspiration to all those who face this operation. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Healthy eating. Nutritional guidelines for people with a colostomy'

Healthy eating. Nutritional guidelines for people with a colostomy (June 2019)

Colostomy UK

Advice on diet and nutrition following a colostomy.

Cover image of 'The cancer whisperer. How to let cancer heal your life'

The cancer whisperer. How to let cancer heal your life (2016)

Coronet (Hodder & Stoughton)

This book does not offer a cure for cancer. It offers a cure for your fear of cancer. Both memoir and self-help book, this is the remarkable chronicle of a passage from 'terminal' diagnosis to exuberant wellness in just a few months. The Cancer Whisperer reverses our traditional adversarial relationship with cancer by teaching us how to listen to it; how to be healed by it as well as seek to cure it; and how to be emotionally free of illness even when physically curtailed. Living on the frontier between her fierce will to live and necessary willingness to die, Sophie - now thriving with cancer - shares her journey with searing honesty, unapologetic vulnerability and intelligent pragmatism. Alongside rare insights into a condition now affecting approximately one in three people, she challenges the mental conditioning we need to overcome to redefine our narratives about cancer. As 'the cancer whisperer', she offers a groundbreaking practical guide that will encourage cancer patients to: Direct their own treatment while preserving their personhood in a system that tends to see them as patients more than people. Engage with fear, anger and grief in healthy and healing ways instead of toughing it out, trying to be positive or collapsing into despair. Radically shift from being a cancer victim to a cancer listener-to seeing cancer less as a disease than as a symptom of other underlying causes, and engaging proactively with whatever changes it calls on them to make. Discover what the author calls 'the whispering, the reaching into a well of darkness and finding your hands painted with light'. Inspired, wise and moving, this book is as unflinching as Lisa Lynch's The C Word, as uplifting as Kris Carr's Crazy, Sexy Cancer, and carries us to a new threshold in our relationship with cancer, strengthening our ability to meet it with courage, creativity, gratitude and grace. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'There's something I've been dying to tell you'

There's something I've been dying to tell you (2014)

Coronet (Hodder & Stoughton)

In 2013 Lynda Bellingham was diagnosed with cancer. Having kept the details of her illness private, now for the very first time Lynda talks with beautiful poignancy about her life since her diagnosis, her family and how together they came to terms with a future they hadn't planned. Having been told that she only has a matter of months left to live and writing this in what will be her final days, There's something I’ve been dying to tell you is a brave and brutally honest memoir and yet Lynda also manages to spread her infectious warmth and humour, bringing light to a very dark time. Woven into this very moving and brave story are extraordinary, colourful tales of her acting and family life that will enlighten and entertain as well as the journey that Lynda has taken to find the family of her birth father having already suffered heartache in her search for her birth mother. In the search for her father's family, Lynda finds a family with a history in entertainment showing that acting was always in the blood. Lynda Bellingham was a tremendously gifted storyteller with a rich collection of tales of love, loss and laughter and this book brings her kind heart, courage and emotion to the page in vivid detail. Lynda's story is an affecting and at times heart-breaking one but it is so often laugh-out-loud too and ultimately the way Lynda tells her life story will serve as a great inspiration. (Publisher)

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