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The web Directory of Information Materials for People Affected by Cancer is regularly updated and currently has details of over 1,900 booklets, leaflets, books and audiovisual materials for people affected by cancer. Most have been published in the last five years but we have included some older ones that are still useful.

Results: 112

Cover image of 'All to live for. Fighting cancer. Finding hope.'

All to live for. Fighting cancer. Finding hope. (2017)

Headline

In 2005 Emma Hannigan was 32, happily married to her long-time love, with two young children. Her world was shattered when she discovered that she had the rare gene BRCA1, meaning a 50% chance of developing ovarian cancer and an 85% chance of breast cancer. To reduce the risk, Emma had a double mastectomy and both ovaries removed, but in 2007 received the news that cancer had struck anyway. Twelve years later, Emma is battling cancer for the tenth time. With warmth and wisdom, she shares her journey and her advice on everything from skincare and hair loss to how to keep a sense of humour through it all. All to Live For is a story of one woman's determination not to let cancer win; a story of strength and inspiration, hope and love. And of never giving up. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Pretty sick. The beauty guide for woman with cancer. How to look your best when you feel your worst'

Pretty sick. The beauty guide for woman with cancer. How to look your best when you feel your worst (2017)

Piatkus Books

The ultimate resource to looking your best during and after cancer treatment, from a veteran beauty industry insider. Like many women who receive the shattering diagnosis of cancer, Caitlin Kiernan was concerned about her health and her future, but also about how the treatment would affect how she felt and looked - would she lose her hair? Would she lose her nails? How would she look after a double mastectomy? But unlike other women who battle cancer, Kiernan has spent her entire career as a beauty editor, beauty director (most recently for Life & Style Weekly), and now beauty producer. As someone who works in the public eye and in the fashion industry, Kiernan had to quickly learn how to look her best even when she was feeling her worst. So she called on her list of extensive contacts and beauty insiders - from hair professionals to top medical doctors (at institutions like Memorial Sloan Kettering and Mt Sinai Hospital) to style mavens and even celebrities (including Wendy Williams and Hoda Kotb) - to gather the best and most useful beauty tips for cancer treatment. The result is Pretty Sick: the ultimate guide to beauty during (and after) cancer treatment, covering skin care, hair care (and wig shopping), nail care, makeup, an explanation of breast cancer surgical options, style advice for life post mastectomy, and much, much more. Illustrated with charming line drawings and peppered with advice from celebrities and cancer survivors, Pretty Sick will be a welcome and trusted resource during treatment, helping women to look their best even when they don't feel their best. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Hair loss'

Hair loss (August 2016)

Lymphoma Association

Understanding the causes of hair loss and knowing how to cover it, if you choose to, can help you cope with this change in your appearance. This factsheet offers advice on how to care for your hair and scalp during and after treatment. It also tells you about some of the headwear options you may wish to consider using until your hair grows back 

Cover image of 'Autologous stem cell transplant'

Autologous stem cell transplant (November 2016)

Lymphoma Action

This booklet describes autologous stem cell transplant in detail. 

Cover image of 'Feel more like you. Expert advice for your skin, nails and hair during cancer treatment'

Feel more like you. Expert advice for your skin, nails and hair during cancer treatment (March 2016)

Macmillan Cancer Support

This leaflet explains how cancer treatment may affect the condition and appearance of your skin, hair and nails and has advice and tips on caring for them.

Cover image of 'Living for a reason - a true cancer journey'

Living for a reason - a true cancer journey (2016)

Austin Macauley

There can be up to 50,000 cases of breast cancer a year in the UK. Ann, in J.A. Prescott's Living for a Reason, is just one. On receiving the news of her condition Ann greets it with the response - You haven't told me that I'm dying yet?' and that is the spirit she carries throughout the book. It is a moving and powerful portrait of a woman who, faced with the vicissitudes of cancer, determines to live life to the full. The book shows Ann as she goes through the stages of cancer and the phases of treatment; the well known mastectomy, the loss of hair, the cosmetic surgery, the chemotherapy and the less well-known side-effects of the drugs. With her condition compounded with the onset of arthritis Ann's determination is inspirational and her story is one of great courage. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Physical recovery after treatment'

Physical recovery after treatment (May 2015)

Lymphoma Association

This factsheet has information about recovering from the side-effects of treatment.

Cover image of 'How you look and feel'

How you look and feel (August 2015)

CLIC Sargent

Advice for children aged 13 and over about some of the symptoms and side-effects of cancer and its treatment that may affect how they feel about themselves (e.g. hair loss and eating problems) and their relationships.

Cover image of 'Recognise yourself. Beauty despite cancer. A practical guide to maintaining your appearance and well-being as you go through surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, or experience hair loss'

Recognise yourself. Beauty despite cancer. A practical guide to maintaining your appearance and well-being as you go through surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, or experience hair loss (2015)

Lotus Publishing

Jennifer Young shares her knowledge and experience by showing those living with cancer and beyond how to prevent, reduce, disguise, camouflage and soothe their appearance-related side effects. Covering subjects such as wig fitting, styling, how to dress your new body, hair regrowth after treatment, and eyebrows and eyelashes, this guide to beauty, hair, style and well-being for cancer patients is the most comprehensive ever published. Jennifer is the founder of www.BeautyDespiteCancer.co.uk and creator of specialist skincare and cosmetics Defiant Beauty. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Nowhere hair'

Nowhere hair (2015)

Thousand Words Press

The little girl in Nowhere Hair knows two things: Her mom's hair is not on her head anymore, so therefore it must be somewhere around the house. After searching the obvious places, the story reveals that her mother, although going through cancer treatment, is still silly, attentive, happy and yes, sometimes very tired and cranky. She learns that she didn't cause the cancer, can't catch it, and that Mommy still is very much up for the job of mothering. The book, written in rhyme, explains hats, scarves, wigs, going bald in public, and the idea of being nice to people who may look a little different than you. It ends with the idea that what is inside of us is far more important than how we look on the outside. For any parent or grandparent, Nowhere Hair offers a comfortable platform to explain something that is inherently very difficult. (Publisher)

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