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The web Directory of Information Materials for People Affected by Cancer is regularly updated and currently has details of over 1,900 booklets, leaflets, books and audiovisual materials for people affected by cancer. Most have been published in the last five years but we have included some older ones that are still useful.

Results: 453

Cover image of 'Pancreatic cancer and end of life care. Information for people in the last few months, weeks or days of life'

Pancreatic cancer and end of life care. Information for people in the last few months, weeks or days of life (March 2018)

Pancreatic Cancer UK

This booklet is for people with pancreatic cancer, their family, friends and carers who want to know more about what may happen in the last few months of life. It includes information about the symptoms that people with pancreatic cancer may get towards the end of their life and how to manage them. There is also information about how to get the care and support you might need, dealing with the emotional impact of dying from pancreatic cancer, and specific information for family members. 

Cover image of 'Patient guide. End of life care'

Patient guide. End of life care (July 2018)

Brainstrust

One in a series of eight leaflets that form the Brain Tumour Patient Guide.

Cover image of 'Before I go. The essential guide to creating a good end of life plan [currently being reviewed by our volunteers]'

Before I go. The essential guide to creating a good end of life plan [currently being reviewed by our volunteers] (2018)

Findhorn Press

A compassionate, practical guide to end-of-life matters, empowering us to clarify and share our wishes and continue to live life to the fullest. Many people say “I wish I had known what they wanted” when their loved one has died. Too often, a person’s wishes for end-of-life care, and for after they have gone, have not been recorded. With this valuable guide, you can now begin to do this for yourself, so your relatives will be able to honor your wishes more easily, saving them unnecessary stress and upset at a potentially intense time. Before I Go addresses the emotional, spiritual, and practical aspects of end-of-life planning to help you make well-informed decisions about your end-of-life care and prepare well for your death. Jane Duncan Rogers guides you with equanimity, care, and humor through subjects such as how to have a conversation about dying, the impact of grief on relatives responsible for estate matters, DIY funerals and what that entails. She states clearly what you need to have in place to ensure the best end of life possible, helps you identify your values and beliefs in this area, and demonstrates which actions you then need to take, and when. With a full resource pack of essential information available to you, including guiding questions, exercises, and recording tools, as well as downloadable worksheets and supportive online courses, decision-making will be much easier and you will find relief and peace of mind knowing you have taken care of outstanding matters. You will also be giving a great gift to your loved ones. When they have this information in advance, you spare them many difficult decisions and administrative hassle at a time when they will be grieving and not in a fit state to cope. It can bring great comfort to those left behind to know they are indeed carrying out your wishes. It also provides an opportunity for you to record your achievements and history, giving them a legacy they would otherwise not have. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Follow the child. Planning and having the best end-of-life care for your child [currently being reviewed by our volunteers]'

Follow the child. Planning and having the best end-of-life care for your child [currently being reviewed by our volunteers] (2018)

Jessica Kingsley Publishers

Drawing on her family's own experiences and those of other parents facing the death of a child from illness or a life-limiting condition, Sacha Langton-Gilks explains the challenges, planning, and conversations that can be expected during this traumatic period. Practical advice such as how to work with the healthcare professionals, drawing up an Advance Care Plan, and how to move care into the home sit alongside tender observations of how such things worked in her own family's story. The book also includes a template person-centred planning document, developed by experts in the field. Empowering and reassuring, this book will help families plan and ensure the best possible end-of-life care for a child or young person. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'What to expect when someone important to you is dying. A guide for carers, families and friends of dying people'

What to expect when someone important to you is dying. A guide for carers, families and friends of dying people (March 2018)

Hospice UK

This booklet is for people caring for someone who is, or who may soon be, in the last stages of life. It is designed to help them prepare for what to expect in the very last days and hours of a person's life. It explains the physical changes that someone may go through when they are dying and what can be done to make them more comfortable, the kind of care a dying person can expect to receive, and where to turn to for help if there are concerns about the end-of-life care received.

Cover image of 'Preparing a child for loss'

Preparing a child for loss (April 2018)

Macmillan Cancer Support|Winston's Wish

This booklet is written with the childhood bereavement charity, Winston’s Wish. It’s for parents or guardians who are near the end of life and aims to help you prepare and talk to a child or children about your death. Partners, grandparents and close family members may find it useful, too. It may also help you talk to children who are already dealing with the death of a family member. 

Cover image of 'Everything happens for a reason and other lies I've loved [currently being reviewed by our volunteers]'

Everything happens for a reason and other lies I've loved [currently being reviewed by our volunteers] (2018)

SPCK Publishing

London-born Kate Bowler, a thirty-five year-old professor at the school of divinity at Duke, had finally had a baby with her childhood sweetheart when she began to feel jabbing pains in her stomach. She lost thirty pounds, guzzled antacid, and visited doctors for three months before she was finally diagnosed with Stage IV colon cancer. As Kate navigates the aftermath of her diagnosis, she pulls the reader into her life and her history - affectionately filled with a colourful retinue of friends, mega-church preachers, parents, and doctors - and shares her irreverent, laser-sharp reflections on faith, friendship, love, and death. She wonders why suffering makes her feel like a loser and explores the burden of positivity. Trying to relish the time she still has with her son and husband, she realizes she must cure her habit of 'skipping to the end' and planning the next move. An historian of the American Prosperity Gospel (the creed of the megachurches that promises believers a cure for tragedy, if they just want it badly enough) Kate finds that she craves these same 'outrageous certainties'. Why is it so hard to surrender when she knows there are no spiritual guarantees? (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The carer's bible'

The carer's bible (2018)

Souvenir Press

This accessible and detailed guide includes practical tips, checklists for best practice, descriptions of their experience from a wide range of carers that addresses solutions to common problems, and expert advice on how to deliver compassionate and dignified care to older people. Uniquely, Amanda Waring also provides support and guidance for the carer, how to maintain energy and commitment, how to recognize signs of compassion fatigue and where carers can get help if they need it. The Carer's Bible is an invaluable, inspiring guide to how to give your loved one the best possible care while addressing the anxieties that all carers suffer. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Cancer and older people'

Cancer and older people (March 2018)

Macmillan Cancer Support

This leaflet is for older people living with cancer. It is aimed at people aged 70 and over, but people under the age of 70 might also find it useful. It explains the different types of treatment and support available. it also has information about living with cancer and other conditions.

Cover image of 'Not that kind of love. A sister, a brother, some tumours and a cat'

Not that kind of love. A sister, a brother, some tumours and a cat (2018)

Quercus

A moving, thought-provoking and surprisingly humorous book which is both a description of a journey to death and a celebration of the act of living. Based on Clare Wise's blog, which she started when she was first diagnosed with cancer in 2013, Not That Kind of Love charts the highs and lows of the last three years of Clare's life. The end result is not a book that fills you with despair and anguish. On the contrary, Not That Kind of Love should be read by everybody for its candour, and for its warmth and spirit. Clare is an astonishingly dynamic, witty and fun personality, and her positivity and energy exude from every page. As she becomes too weak to type, her brother - the actor Greg Wise - takes over, and the book morphs into a beautiful meditation on life, and the necessity of talking about death. With echoes of Atul Gawande's Being Mortal and Cathy Rentzenbrink's The Last Act of Love, it is a very special read that rejoices in the extraordinary and often underestimated sibling bond, and the importance of making the most of the ordinary pleasures life has to offer. As Greg Wise writes in the book: 'Celebrate the small things, the small moments. If you find yourself with matching socks as you leave the house in the morning, that is a cause for celebration. If the rest of the day is spent finding the cure for cancer, or brokering world peace, then that's a bonus.' (Publisher) 

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