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The web Directory of Information Materials for People Affected by Cancer is regularly updated and currently has details of over 1,900 booklets, leaflets, books and audiovisual materials for people affected by cancer. Most have been published in the last five years but we have included some older ones that are still useful.

Results: 431

Cover image of 'Supporting your grandchild and family. An information guide for grandparents of a child or young person diagnosed with cancer'

Supporting your grandchild and family. An information guide for grandparents of a child or young person diagnosed with cancer (April 2019)

Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group

Being told your grandchild has cancer comes as a terrible shock. Most grandparents worry not only about their grandchild, but also about how their own son/daughter will cope. Many are also concerned about the effects a cancer diagnosis will have on other children within the family, how they can support their family and how, as grandparents, they themselves will cope. Sometimes, it is not as easy for grandparents to access information first hand and this can lead to feelings of isolation. This guide answers some of the many questions grandparents might have during diagnosis and treatment.

Cover image of 'Donating your stem cells to your brother or sister. A guide to stem cell (bone marrow) donation for teenagers and young adults'

Donating your stem cells to your brother or sister. A guide to stem cell (bone marrow) donation for teenagers and young adults (May 2019)

Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group

Illustrated, colour booklet for children who may be donating bone marrow or stem cells to a sibling. It describes stem cells and stem cell transplants, why a transplant is needed, the types of transplants, the selection process, tissue typing, harvesting the bone marrow (including the risks and side-effects), and what happens if the transplant is unsuccessful. It also covers issues such as consent, what to take into hospital, and changes to sibling relationships. Includes details of useful organisations and a glossary of terms.

Cover image of 'A story about cancer (with a happy ending)'

A story about cancer (with a happy ending) (2019)

Frances Lincoln Children’s Books

A teenage girl heads towards the hospital waiting room where the doctors are going to tell her how much time she's got to live. As she walks, she thinks about her journey up to this point… the terrible decor in the hospital, wearing a headscarf, the horrible treatments, but also being with her friends, family, and her new boyfriend Victor. This is a story about cancer with a happy ending. It's about life, love, and especially, hope. (Publisher) 

Cover image of 'Beyond'

Beyond (2019)

Burning Chair

What happens when we die? Is this really all there is? What exists beyond this life?Alex Duncan is just an ordinary 14 year old boy. His main worries are homework, girls, the school bully......and his sister, Jenna who has ovarian cancer, stage B. As his parents retreat into themselves, Alex is desperate to find a way to help, a way to make things better for his sister. After all, it’s the not knowing that’s the worst thing.Whilst he tries to untangle the ultimate question, life still goes on: his best friend seems oblivious to his feelings about her, the school bully has taken a special interest in him, and everything he does just makes him feel more and more awkward and out of place.Georgia Springate’s debut novel, Beyond, is a funny and touchingly compelling coming-of-age story about love, loss and discovery. Read it and take an emotional journey through one boy’s quest to understand that most tricky of questions: what lies beyond? (Publishers)

Cover image of 'Anna loses her hair. A children’s guide to hair loss as a result of cancer treatment'

Anna loses her hair. A children’s guide to hair loss as a result of cancer treatment (October 2018)

Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group

Hair loss is a common side effect of having chemotherapy and of radiotherapy to the head. This book tells the story of Anna, Jack and Laura who all lose their hair while having treatment for cancer and helps young children to understand what might happen.

Cover image of 'Jess's bone marrow donation. A children's guide to bone marrow donation'

Jess's bone marrow donation. A children's guide to bone marrow donation (January 2018)

Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group

A colourful booklet for young children who are preparing to donate bone marrow. It explains what bone marrow is and describes what happens to Jess in hospital before, during and after the operation and when she goes home.

Cover image of 'Peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) harvesting. Information for young people with cancer, and parents of a child or young person with cancer, having a stem cell transplant, and for stem cell donors'

Peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) harvesting. Information for young people with cancer, and parents of a child or young person with cancer, having a stem cell transplant, and for stem cell donors (November 2018)

Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group

This factsheet is written to help explain what is involved when you undergo a peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) harvest. It explains what haematopoietic stem cells are; why we need to collect them; and what happens before, during and after the harvest.

Cover image of 'Tom has lymphoma'

Tom has lymphoma (November 2018)

CLIC Sargent|Lymphoma Action

Tom is ten years old when he is diagnosed with lymphoma. This illustrated, colour storybook for parents to read with their children describes what happens when he has to go to the hospital for tests and treatment. The story follows Tom from when he first feels ill, through diagnosis and treatment, to recovery and return to normal life.

Cover image of 'Helping your child to eat well during cancer treatment. A practical information guide for parents and families of a child or young person with cancer'

Helping your child to eat well during cancer treatment. A practical information guide for parents and families of a child or young person with cancer (October 2018)

Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group

Children with cancer may experience problems with eating and drinking at some stage. This can be due to the cancer or its treatment. This booklet has ideas on helping children with a poor appetite and other eating problems.

Cover image of 'The cancer guide for young people. What to expect when you're affected by cancer'

The cancer guide for young people. What to expect when you're affected by cancer (February 2018)

Macmillan Cancer Support

A booklet for young people aged 12-25 years. It aims to help answer some of their questions and to provide tips and guidance. It explains what cancer is and how it can be treated. It also gives practical tips about coping with treatment, relationships and sorting out practical things like school, university, work, and money.

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