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The web Directory of Information Materials for People Affected by Cancer is regularly updated and currently has details of over 1,900 booklets, leaflets, books and audiovisual materials for people affected by cancer. Most have been published in the last five years but we have included some older ones that are still useful.

Results: 537

Cover image of 'Secondary breast cancer in the bone'

Secondary breast cancer in the bone (March 2018)

Breast Cancer Care

A booklet for people who have been diagnosed with secondary cancer in the bones that has spread from the breast. It describes what secondary breast cancer in the bone is, the symptoms, and the investigations. It also describes the treatment options, but not in great detail. Lists useful organisations.

Cover image of 'Breast cancer during and after pregnancy'

Breast cancer during and after pregnancy (May 2018)

Breast Cancer Care

A booklet for women whose breast cancer has been diagnosed during pregnancy or within a year of giving birth. It describes how breast cancer is diagnosed in pregnancy and the treatment options. It also covers coping with the diagnosis and continuing with the pregnancy.

Cover image of 'Chemotherapy for breast cancer'

Chemotherapy for breast cancer (January 2018)

Breast Cancer Care

This booklet describes chemotherapy and explains how and when it might be used to treat breast cancer, and the possible side-effects. It also discusses issues such as fertility and contraception, and coping with chemotherapy.

Cover image of 'Breast cancer and hair loss'

Breast cancer and hair loss (January 2018)

Breast Cancer Care

Many people will lose either some or all of their hair as a result of treatment for breast cancer. For some, this is the most distressing side effect of treatment. Some people find that being prepared for hair loss before it occurs helps them cope better when it happens. This booklet explains how you may lose your hair and the effect it can have. It looks at how to care for your hair and scalp during and after treatment and the different headwear you may want to try, including wigs and headscarves. It includes step-by-step guides to tying headscarves and tips on recreating the illusion of eyebrows and eyelashes. The final part of the booklet discusses what usually happens when your hair grows back and how to look after it.

Cover image of 'Breast reconstruction'

Breast reconstruction (January 2018)

Breast Cancer Care

This booklet is for women considering breast reconstruction after breast surgery to treat breast cancer.

Cover image of 'Menopausal symptoms and breast cancer'

Menopausal symptoms and breast cancer (March 2018)

Breast Cancer Care

A booklet for women who are experiencing menopausal symptoms after breast cancer treatment. It has advice on treatments (prescription drugs and complementary therapies) and practical measures for coping with hot flushes, vaginal dryness, loss of libido, mood swings, joint pain and risk of osteoporosis. Includes details of further support.

Cover image of 'The complete guide to breast cancer: how to feel empowered and take control [currently being reviewed by our volunteers]'

The complete guide to breast cancer: how to feel empowered and take control [currently being reviewed by our volunteers] (2018)

Vermilion

The book you can trust to support you at every stage of your treatment - and beyond. Professor Trisha Greenhalgh, an academic GP, and Dr Liz O’Riordan, a Consultant Breast Cancer Surgeon, are not only outstanding doctors, but they have also experienced breast cancer first-hand. The Complete Guide to Breast Cancer brings together all the knowledge they have gathered as patients and as doctors to give you and your family a trusted, thorough and up-to-date source of information. Designed to empower you during your breast cancer treatment, it covers: simple explanations of every breast cancer treatment; coping with the emotional burden of breast cancer; frank advice about sex and relationships; staying healthy during and after treatment; dealing with the fear of recurrence; living with secondary breast cancer. Packed full of all the things the authors wished they’d known when they were diagnosed, and tips on how to cope with surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy and beyond, this is the only book you need to read to guide you through your breast cancer diagnosis. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Lung cancer [Welsh]'

Lung cancer [Welsh] (2018)

Macmillan Cancer Support

This information is about lung cancer and treatments for lung cancer. It is about cancer that starts in the lung (primary lung cancer). It is not about cancer that starts somewhere else in the body and spreads to the lungs (secondary lung cancer). Includes English-language version. 

Cover image of 'Lung cancer [Russian]'

Lung cancer [Russian] (2018)

Macmillan Cancer Support

This information is about lung cancer and treatments for lung cancer. It is about cancer that starts in the lung (primary lung cancer). It is not about cancer that starts somewhere else in the body and spreads to the lungs (secondary lung cancer). Includes English-language version. 

Cover image of 'The neuroscientist who lost her mind. A memoir of madness and recovery [currently being reviewed by our volunteers]'

The neuroscientist who lost her mind. A memoir of madness and recovery [currently being reviewed by our volunteers] (2018)

Bantam Press (imprint of Transworld Publications)

All we think, feel and dream, how we move, if we move, everything that makes us who we are, comes from the brain. We are the brain. So what happens when the brain fails? What happens when we lose our mind? In January 2015, renowned neuroscientist Barbara Lipska's melanoma spread to her brain. It was, in effect, a death sentence. She had surgery, radiation treatments and entered an immunotherapy clinical trial. And then her brain started to play tricks on her. The expert on mental illness - who had spent a career trying to work out how the brain operates and what happens when it fails - experienced what it is like to go mad. She began to exhibit paranoia and schizophrenia-like symptoms. She became disinhibited, completely unaware of her inappropriate behaviour. She got lost driving home from work, a journey she did every day. She couldn't remember things that had just happened to her. Small details like what she was having for breakfast became an obsession, but she ignored the fact that she was about to die. And she remembers every moment with absolute clarity. Weaving the science of the mind and the biology of the brain into her deeply personal story, this is the dramatic account of Dr Lipska's own brilliant brain gone awry. (Publisher)

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